The Artist's Complete Guide to Drawing the Head [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this innovative guide, master art instructor William Maughan demonstrates how to create a realistic human likeness by using the classic and highly accurate modeling technique of chiaroscuro (Italian for ?light and dark?) developed by Leonardo da Vinci during the High Renaissance.

Maughan first introduces readers to the basics of this centuries-old technique, showing how to analyze form, light, and shadow; use dark pencil, white pencil, and ...
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The Artist's Complete Guide to Drawing the Head

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Overview

In this innovative guide, master art instructor William Maughan demonstrates how to create a realistic human likeness by using the classic and highly accurate modeling technique of chiaroscuro (Italian for “light and dark”) developed by Leonardo da Vinci during the High Renaissance.

Maughan first introduces readers to the basics of this centuries-old technique, showing how to analyze form, light, and shadow; use dark pencil, white pencil, and toned paper to create a full range of values; use the elements of design to enhance a likeness; and capture a sitter’s gestures and proportions. He then demonstrates, step by step, how to draw each facial feature, develop visual awareness, and render the head in color with soft pastels.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This solid effort uses a drawing method based on value, rather than line, and on the centuries-old principles of chiaroscuro. The latter creates an illusion of three-dimensionality by studying light as it falls across the structure of form. It attempts an exact rendering of both form shadows and cast shadows. Maughan cites the Mona Lisa as the supreme example of chiaroscuro in portraiture. He supplements chapters on drawing technique with a good section on using color and a bizarre, extraneous chapter on using pig snouts and elephant ears to create grotesque portraits. For a good beginners' book on portraiture, see Pat Clarke's Painting Heads and Faces. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780770434731
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press
  • Publication date: 8/14/2013
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 542,451
  • File size: 46 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

William Maughan has taught advanced head drawing, head painting, and landscape painting at both the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA, and the Academy of Art College in San Francisco. He lives in Napa, CA.
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Table of Contents

Preface 10
Introduction: The Drawing Method and Materials 13
Chiaroscuro 14
Sfumato 15
The Materials 16
Substitute Materials 16
Working with the Pencil 17
Drawing Shadow Shapes 18
Sharpening the Pencil 18
Chapter 1 Principles of Chiaroscuro 21
Line Versus Value 22
"Lost-and-Found" Line 23
Value and Form 24
Paper + Two Pencils = A Full-Value Range 25
The Shadow Shapes and Their Edges 26
Form-Shadows 26
Cast-Shadows 26
The Shadow Edges 28
The Form in Light 29
Analyzing Form 30
Negative Shapes 33
Chapter 2 Principles of Drawing the Head 35
Two Masses of Light and Shadow 36
Lighting the Head 37
Artificial and Natural Light 38
Light Advances; Dark Recedes 38
Single Focal Point 43
Perspective and the Three-Quarter View 45
Perspective 45
Planes of the Head 47
Foreshortening 48
Value Pattern 52
Addressing the Background 53
Chapter 3 The Drawing Process, Step-By-Step 55
Sculpting the Head 56
Gesture 57
The Tilt 59
Proportions 60
Placing the Features 62
The Anatomy of the Eyes 65
The Orbicular Cavity 65
The Natural Slants of the Eye 67
The Eyelids, Pupil, and Iris 68
Positions of the Eyes 69
Drawing the Eyes 70
Highlights on the Eyes 72
Using the Paper Value 75
Examples of Eyes 76
Nose and Mouth 82
The Structure of the Nose and Mouth 84
Examples of the Nose and Mouth 86
Ears 94
Placement of the Ear 95
Hair 100
Troubleshooting Example 105
Chapter 4 Putting it all Together 107
The Five Essential Drawing Steps 108
Review 108
The Demonstrations 109
Going Forward 118
Practice Ideas 118
Self-Critique 121
Taking Your Skills to the Next Level 121
Chapter 5 Drawing from Multiple Sources 123
Combining References 124
A Demonstration 126
Examples of Composite Drawings 128
Chapter 6 Working with Color 133
From Drawing to Painting 134
The Color "Wheel" 136
Complementary Colors 136
Color Intensity 138
Mixing from the Tertiary Colors 138
Color Temperature 140
Color Relationships 142
Warm Advances; Cool Recedes 142
Family of Colors 143
Expressive Color 145
Pastel Painting 148
The Materials 149
Caring for Your Pastel 150
Applying the Charcoal Pencil 150
Applying the Tone 150
Applying the Pastel 151
Painting the Background 152
Pastel Demonstration 153
Pastel Demonstration Two 156
Index 160
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2013

    I read this when I was starting off as a beginner animator and i

    I read this when I was starting off as a beginner animator and it really did put into perspective shading since shading was a thing that was beyond me and still is beyond me since it's such a large concept to wrap around. But this gives a stable basic understanding which you can only grow from in your own way. Recommend it all the time. Because you do learn. Just need to rereread to have it sink fully down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2009

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    Posted May 18, 2009

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