As A Driven Leaf

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Overview

A spirited classic of American Jewish literature, a historical novel about ancient sage-turned-apostate Elisha ben Abuyah in the late first century C.E. At the heart of the tale are questions about faith and the loss of faith and the repression and rebellion of the Jews of Palestine. Elisha is a leading scholar in Palestine, elected to the Sanhedrin, the highest Jewish court in the land. But two tragedies awaken doubt about God in Elisha's mind, and doubt eats away at his faith. Declared a heretic and excommunicated from the Jewish community, he journeys to Antioch in nearby Syria to begin a quest through Greek and Roman culture for some fundamental irrefutable truth. The pace of the narrative picks up as Elisha directly encounters the full force of the ancient Romans' all-consuming culture. Ultimately, Elisha is forced by the power of Rome to choose between loyalty to his people, who are rebelling against the emperor's domination, and loyalty to his own quest for truth.—Publishers Weekly

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Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
A ground-breaking historical novel, As A Driven Leaf offers an unparalleled view of the conflicts between Judaism and the pagan world, from the brilliant legal debates of the Sanhedrin to the bloody gladiatorial contests of the Roman arena. By effectively utilizing First Century characters, Steinberg is able to illuminate the pervasive tensions between Jews living in a world of gentiles. George Guidall's talented narration in this abridged audiobook edition does full justice to Milton Steinberg's superbly crafted story and brings the listener into a world of revolution, change, and conflict with the engaging intimacy of a true "theatre of the mind" experience.
August 2000
Joe Stafford
Plumbing the ancient past to inform modern Zionism, the novel tells the story of a young rabbi living under Roman rule 2,000 years ago at the time of the writing of the Talmud, a collection of writings on Jewish law.
—Austin American-Statesman
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Guidall gives a spirited, almost theatrical, reading of this minor classic of American Jewish literature, a historical novel about ancient sage-turned-apostate Elisha ben Abuyah in the late first century C.E. At the heart of the tale are questions about faith and the loss of faith and the repression and rebellion of the Jews of Palestine. Elisha is a leading scholar in Palestine, elected to the Sanhedrin, the highest Jewish court in the land. But two tragedies awaken doubt about God in Elisha's mind, and doubt eats away at his faith. Declared a heretic and excommunicated from the Jewish community, he journeys to Antioch in nearby Syria to begin a quest through Greek and Roman culture for some fundamental irrefutable truth. The pace of the narrative picks up as Elisha directly encounters the full force of the ancient Romans' all-consuming culture. Ultimately, Elisha is forced by the power of Rome to choose between loyalty to his people, who are rebelling against the emperor's domination, and loyalty to his own quest for truth. Guidall, a veteran actor and recorder of audiobooks, reads with an appropriately weighted force. And he convincingly creates voices for a score of characters--including the protagonist Elisha; his haughty, social-climbing wife, Deborah; the gentle sage and Elisha's mentor, Rabbi Joshua; and Rufus Tinneius, the tyrannical Roman governor of Palestine. A small booklet of notes accompanying the audiobook provides helpful historical background. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
As a Driven Leaf at first seems to be a fairly dreary philosophic novel, outlining first-century rabbi Elisha Ben Abuyah's education, views, and eventual crisis of faith. Just as the listener begins to doze, though, the book morphs into a 1950s movie epic (think Charlton Heston), as Elisha leaves Jerusalem and encounters the Roman Empire in all its spectacle, temptation, and cruelty. Though Elisha betrays his people and abandons his faith, he manages to remain a sympathetic and compassionate character. Based on real people and events, Steinberg's 1940 novel successfully combines these two wildly different subjects. The light abridgment keeps the pace brisk. Part of the "Great Jewish Books on Audiotape" series, this is also an impressive production, including a reader's guide and a bravura narration by George Guidall. Libraries serving significant Jewish populations should definitely buy this, and all others should balance its many merits with its relative obscurity.--John Hiett, Iowa City P.L. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Internet Bookwatch
Milton Steinberg's As A Driven Leaf is the explosive, touching story of Elisha Ben Abuyah, the real-life Talmudic sage who experienced a crisis of faith in the face of political tyranny and terrible human suffering. A ground breaking historical novel, As A Driven Leaf offers an unparalleled view of the conflicts between Judaism and the pagan world, from the brilliant legal debates of the Sanhedrin to the bloody gladiatorial contests of the Roman arena. By effectively utilizing First Century characters, Steinberg is ably to vividly illuminate the pervasive tensions between Jews a world of gentiles. George Guidall's talented narration in this complete and unabridged audiobook edition does full justice to Milton Steinberg's superbly crafted story and brings the listener into a world of revolution, change, and conflict with the engaging intimacy of a true "theatre of the mind" experience.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780876689943
  • Publisher: Aronson, Jason Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/1/1987
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 480
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 1.37 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2003

    Not the book I hoped for

    Iwanted to love this work as I had been told so much about it. I wanted to understand in a deeper way the questioning soul of Elisha ben Abuya, and the arguments by which his friends and contemporaries would prove him wrong. I was swept up by the book in the beginning. A good read. But it never really turned in the way I hoped, and did not become the passionate defense of the Jewish faith I expected. It seemed to me instead to disintegrate into a kind of ' speculative fiction' about realities of no real central importance to the Jewish living of the good life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2000

    An Insightful Look into the Soul of Doubt

    Although this tale is somewhat wooden in execution and its characters never come fully to life, and while the thrust of the tale, itself, is an intellectual rather than a visceral one, I was greatly moved by it. There is a tradition in the Talmud that four great sages sought to go beyond the realm of man's knowledge. One died. One went insane. One became a heretic. And only the great Akiba came out of it whole, only to be tortured to death by the Romans in the aftermath of the third abortive rebellion against the Empire. Well, Elisha ben Abuyah, the central character of this tale, is the one who became a heretic. He is recalled in the Talmud as a member of the Rabbinate who forsook his faith and people for the Greek way, thereby condemning himself, in life and memory, to excommunication and the label of heretic. This tale attempts to visualize what might have driven such a man and where it would have taken him in the end. The actions of the story are really quite commonplace until one gets to the final Roman war against the Jews in Palestine. But even these events are seen only from a distance. The real crux of this tale is the seeking and the life-events which might have underlay the tale of Elisha and help explain why he did what he did. His is the tale of the child of a Hellenized father, wrested at his father's death from the larger, intellectual Greek world and shoe-horned into a realm of orthodoxy in keeping with the narrow prejudices of his deceased mother's brother. His Greek learning aborted, Elisha becomes an enthusiastic student of his people's traditions rising, in time, to membership in the revered Sanhedrin. But the Greek seeds (or something else) have been planted and in time take root, pushing out the superimposed shrubbery of orthodxy. And Elisha begins to doubt and question. Unable to reconcile his restless questioning to the blind teachings of orthodxy, he seeks wider knowledge, causing a rift with the community of the orthodox. Driven into exile in Antioch he begins a life of study and inquiry, trying always to use his reason to erect an edifice in which he can wholeheartedly believe. But events catch up with him even as his understanding increases. There is a very fine rendering here of that process by which we try to understand the underpinnings of the world in which we exist and one sees clearly the metaphysical problems and Elisha's burden in grappling with them. He does seem a bit simple at times and one can't help thinking that this, in some sense, is the author's own tale, writ into a fable about a first century Jew in the Roman world. But it's all very compelling and, at times, riveting, especially as it captures the hellenistic world and its thought. But it's a book of ideas rather than people -- ideas which tear at all of us in the end.

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