Ascension by John Coltrane | 602517920248 | CD | Barnes & Noble
Ascension [Editions I and II]

Ascension [Editions I and II]

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by John Coltrane
     
 

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Ascension is the single recording that placed John Coltrane firmly into the avant-garde. Whereas, prior to 1965, Coltrane could be heard playing in an avant vein with stretched-out solos, atonality, and a seemingly free design to the beat, Ascension throws most rules right out the window with complete freedom from the groove and strikingly

Overview

Ascension is the single recording that placed John Coltrane firmly into the avant-garde. Whereas, prior to 1965, Coltrane could be heard playing in an avant vein with stretched-out solos, atonality, and a seemingly free design to the beat, Ascension throws most rules right out the window with complete freedom from the groove and strikingly abrasive sheets of horn interplay. Recorded with three tenors (Trane, Pharoah Sanders, Archie Shepp), two altos (Marion Brown, John Tchicai), two trumpet players (Freddie Hubbard, Dewey Johnson), two bassists (Art Davis, Jimmy Garrison), the lone McCoy Tyner on piano, and Elvin Jones on the drums, this large group is both relentless and soulful simultaneously. While there are segments where the ensemble plays discordant and abrasive skronks, these are usually segues into intriguing blues-based solos from each member. The comparison that is immediately realized is Ornette Coleman's Free Jazz of five years previous. However, it should be known that Ascension certainly carries its own weight, and in a strange sense makes Coleman's foray a passive adventure -- mostly due to an updated sonic quality (à la Bob Thiele) and also Trane's greater sense of passionate spiritualism. Timed at around 40 minutes, this can be a difficult listen at first, but with a patient ear and an appreciation for the finer things in life, the reward is a greater understanding of the personal path that the artist was on at that particular time in his development. Coltrane was always on an unceasing mission for personal expansion through the mouthpiece of his horn, but by the time of this recording he had begun to reach the level of "elder statesman" and to find other voices (Shepp, Sanders, and Marion Brown) to propel and expand his sounds and emotions. Therefore, Ascension reflects more of an event rather than just a jazz record and should be sought out by either experienced jazz appreciators or other open-minded listeners, but not by unsuspecting bystanders.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/24/2009
Label:
Imports
UPC:
0602517920248
catalogNumber:
5036127
Rank:
78499

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

John Coltrane   Primary Artist,Tenor Saxophone
Marion Brown   Alto Saxophone
Art Davis   Bass
Elvin Jones   Drums
Archie Shepp   Tenor Saxophone
Jimmy Garrison   Bass
McCoy Tyner   Piano
Freddie Hubbard   Trumpet
Dewey Johnson   Trumpet
Pharoah Sanders   Tenor Saxophone
John Tchicai   Alto Saxophone

Technical Credits

John Coltrane   Composer
Rudy Van Gelder   Engineer
Amiri Baraka   Author
Bob Thiele   Producer
A.B. Spellman   Liner Notes
Charles Stewart   Cover Photo
Hollis King   Art Direction
Joe Lebow   Liner Design
Robert Flynn   Cover Design

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Ascension [Editions I and II] 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is humorous to witness hip-hop emcees who believe they are so intense and gritty. It's obvious, none of these guys have heard of John Coltrane. With the exception of the Wu, I don't think any of these artists can go much beyond three minutes and still be saying something-- let alone forty! This might not be your mother's or girlfriend's favorite CD, even though it should be. As a matter of fact, if I meet a woman who is into this as much as I am, I'll probably ask her to marry me. When you listen to this CD, you must forget everything you ever knew about music. Here's why. 99% of all musicians play what the audience wants to hear. This is obviously because the entertainer wants the audience to have a good time, but Coltrane takes this to another level. Instead of haveing a good time, Coltrane plays as if he wants you to have a good life-- a wholesome life. I cannot lie and say this album is like Giant Steps, but I can say the two are similar in that both show an artist striving for perfection-- whether professional or spiritual.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This CD is mind-blowing. Simply superb. Not reccomended if you are not familiar with Coltrane (specificaly A Love Supreme), though. Coltrane's soloing and, later the rest of the band (often at the same time) is amazing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
IT IS A GREAT ALBUM HE ABONDONS ALL RULES ON COHRD CHANGES AND JAZZ CONVENTIONALISM