Asher's Fault

Asher's Fault

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by Elizabeth Wheeler
     
 

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The day fourteen-year-old Asher receives a Minolta camera from his aunt Sharon, he buys the last roll of black-and-white film and takes his first photograph—a picture of a twisted pine tree. He’s so preoccupied with his new hobby he fails to notice his dad’s plan to move out, his increasing alienation from his testosterone-ridden best friend, Levi,… See more details below

Overview

The day fourteen-year-old Asher receives a Minolta camera from his aunt Sharon, he buys the last roll of black-and-white film and takes his first photograph—a picture of a twisted pine tree. He’s so preoccupied with his new hobby he fails to notice his dad’s plan to move out, his increasing alienation from his testosterone-ridden best friend, Levi, and his own budding sexuality. When his little brother drowns at the same moment Asher experiences his first same-sex kiss, he can no longer hide behind the lens of his camera. Asher thinks it’s his fault, but after his brother dies, his father resurfaces along with clues challenging Asher’s black-and-white view of the world. The truth is as twisted as the pine tree in his first photograph.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-01
Guilt can prove more potent than adolescent hormones when, during your first kiss, the little brother you're supposed to be watching drowns. Fourteen-year-old Asher Price lives in small-town Florida with all the average American trimmings: divorced parents, one brother and a broken screen door. Asher's father left the family and is absent save for his mother's frequently voiced disdain. A reserved young man, Asher finds escape from his fractured family with a vintage Minolta. Then comes handsome, charismatic Garrett, who triggers stirrings Asher wants to explore. When Garrett and Asher sneak off to share a kiss at the public pool, Asher's brother drowns. A consequent combination of guilt and religious reflex suppresses any urges Asher has to pursue his attraction to Garrett--or any guy--ever again. Neither as optimistic as David Levithan's Boy Meets Boy (2003) nor as revelatory as emily m. danforth's The Miseducation of Cameron Post (2012), this novel finds itself in a realistically awkward place between. It's a study of how sad and treacherous it can be for an LGBTQ teen--or any teen--to achieve self-acceptance. The rhythm of the text often falls into short phrasing, making it read the way photographers might digest their surroundings: in rapid-fire observations of the tiniest details. A book of subtlety that won't necessarily change the world but could make a world of difference to LGBTQ teens grappling with identity. (Fiction. 14 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781602829824
Publisher:
Bold Strokes Books
Publication date:
09/17/2013
Pages:
264
Sales rank:
855,489
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Wheeler’s passion for writing, directing, and teaching is driven by a quest to unleash the authentic human experience in literature, on the stage, and in life. As a teacher, she is touched and inspired by the real-world examples of how students, facing adversity, assimilate the lessons learned from those experiences to persevere and transform into triumphant adults. A former Chicago model and actor, Elizabeth now teaches English in rural Illinois. She is a graduate of the University of Florida and the inaugural novel writing program at the University of Chicago’s Graham School. As an advocate for student storytelling in the print and digital world, she has spoken internationally as well as at educational conferences in Illinois. Elizabeth is co-founder of a professional theater company, Heart and Soul Productions, and director of her school’s drama program. A fifth generation Floridian, Elizabeth now lives in Illinois with her husband, two sons, and nephew. Asher’s Fault is her first novel.

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