Asian Philosophies / Edition 4

Asian Philosophies / Edition 4

by John M. Koller
     
 

ISBN-10: 0130923850

ISBN-13: 9780130923851

Pub. Date: 06/29/2001

Publisher: Pearson

This book carefully introduces and analyzes the basic philosophical ideas, theories, and arguments of the most important philosophers of China, Japan, and India–from ancient times to the present. It provides insights into the different ways in which fundamental philosophical questions have been considered in Asia, and the basic

Overview

This book carefully introduces and analyzes the basic philosophical ideas, theories, and arguments of the most important philosophers of China, Japan, and India–from ancient times to the present. It provides insights into the different ways in which fundamental philosophical questions have been considered in Asia, and the basic ideas and values that enable us to understand the life and culture of the people who inhabit it. Three-part coverage looks at the historical perspectives–and much more–of Indian, Buddhist, and Chinese philosophies. For individuals interested in Asian philosophy and theology.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780130923851
Publisher:
Pearson
Publication date:
06/29/2001
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
361
Product dimensions:
6.16(w) x 8.94(h) x 0.68(d)

Table of Contents

Prefacexiii
Introductionxv
Part IIndian Philosophies
Chapter 1Historical Perspectives3
Historical Overview3
Dominant Features7
Review Questions11
Further Reading12
Chapter 2Vedas and Upanishads14
Indus Culture14
Vedic Thought15
The Upanishads19
Review Questions26
Further Reading26
Chapter 3The Jain Vision28
Brief Overview28
Historical Context29
Bondage30
Way of Liberation34
Faith, Knowledge, and Conduct36
Impact of Jain Thought41
Review Questions42
Further Reading42
Chapter 4Society and the Individual44
Bhagavad Gita44
Human Aims46
Social Classes49
Life-Stages51
Review Questions52
Further Reading52
Notes53
Chapter 5Self and the World: Samkhya-Yoga54
Samkhya: A Dualistic Theory of Reality54
Causality55
Evolution of the World57
Yoga: The Way of Discipline60
Review Questions65
Further Reading65
Notes66
Chapter 6Knowledge and Reality: Nyaya-Vaisheshika67
The Problem of Knowledge67
The Means of Knowledge68
The Objects of Knowledge: The Vaisheshika Categories73
Review Questions76
Further Reading77
Chapter 7Self and Reality: Mimamsa and Vedanta78
Mimamsa78
Vedanta81
Shankara's Nondualism82
The Qualified Nondualism of Ramanuja88
The Dualistic Vedanta of Madhva90
Review Questions92
Further Reading92
Note93
Chapter 8Theistic Developments94
Vishnu95
Kali99
Shiva101
Review Questions104
Further Reading104
Chapter 9Islam106
Basic Teachings of Islam107
Development of Sufi Thought109
The Sufi Path113
Interaction Between Muslims and Hindus114
Religion and Politics118
Review Questions120
Further Reading121
Notes122
Chapter 10Continuing Tradition123
Gandhi124
Aurobindo125
Iqbal127
Radhakrishnan130
Review Questions132
Further Reading132
Notes133
Part IIBuddhist Philosophies
Chapter 11Historical Perspectives137
Central Teaching137
India at the Time of the Buddha138
After the Buddha139
Mahayana and Theravada139
Philosophical Traditions142
Buddhism in China145
Buddhism in Korea and Japan145
Buddhism in the West146
Review Questions146
Further Reading146
Chapter 12The Life and Teachings of the Buddha148
The Buddha148
The Four Signs149
Quest for Enlightenment151
The Buddha's Teachings155
The Noble Eightfold Path160
Review Questions164
Further Reading164
Notes166
Chapter 13Interdependent Arising167
Principle of Conditioned Existence167
The Wheel of Becoming168
Mindfulness175
Review Questions180
Further Reading180
Notes181
Chapter 14Sarvastivada182
Sarvastivada Teachings182
Foundations of Abhidharma183
Arguments Against Substance186
Review Questions191
Further Reading191
Notes191
Chapter 15Perfection of Wisdom193
Perfection of Wisdom Tradition193
Diamond Sutra196
Heart Sutra198
Review Questions201
Further Reading201
Notes201
Chapter 16Madhyamaka: The Middle Way Tradition203
Overview of Madhyamaka203
Middle Way Philosophy of Nagarjuna204
A Dialogue on the Teaching and Practice of Emptiness211
Review Questions216
Further Reading216
Notes217
Chapter 17Yogacara218
Overview of Yogacara218
Existence and Consciousness219
Knowledge of Reality226
Review Questions229
Further Reading229
Notes230
Chapter 18Buddhism in Japan: Zen231
Overview231
Indian and Chinese Foundations233
Taoist Influences235
Aims of Zen236
Practice238
Teachings243
Ox-Herding: Stages of Practice244
Review Questions251
Further Reading251
Notes252
Part IIIChinese Philosophies
Chapter 19Historical Perspectives257
Pre-Confucian China257
Confucianism258
Taoism259
Mohism260
School of Names260
Yin-Yang261
Legalism262
Early Medieval Developments262
Chinese Buddhism263
Neo-Confucianism264
Basic Characteristics of Chinese Philosophy265
Review Questions267
Further Reading268
Notes269
Chapter 20Confucianism270
Confucius270
Humanity (Jen)271
Propriety (Li)273
Filial Piety (Hsiao)274
Righteousness (Yi)275
Rectification of Names (Cheng-Ming)276
Governing by Virtue276
Mencius281
Hsun Tzu283
Review Questions284
Further Reading285
Notes285
Chapter 21Taoism: The Natural Way of Freedom287
Lao Tzu287
The Tao and Its Manifestations290
Chuang Tzu293
Review Questions301
Further Reading302
Notes303
Chapter 22Neo-Confucianism: The Grand Harmony304
The Buddhist Challenge304
Neo-Confucian Beginnings305
Ch'eng Hao and Ch'eng I309
Chu Hsi313
Wang Yang-ming317
Tai Chen320
Review Questions321
Further Reading322
Notes323
Chapter 23Recent Chinese Philosophical Thought324
K'ang Yu-wei325
Chang Tung-sun326
Hsiung Shih-li328
Fung Yu-lan331
Mao Tse-tung334
Post-Mao Thought337
Review Questions340
Further Reading340
Notes341
Glossary343
Pronunciation Guide348
Index355

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