ASP.NET Developer's JumpStart

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Overview

The purpose of ASP.NET JumpStart is to show readers the practical applications of .NET and ASP.NET by illustrating how to build Web-based applications using Web Forms and Web Services. Emphasis will be on good programming standards and practices. The reader will be taken from an introduction of the VB .NET language to intermediate topics through a step-by-step approach, which gives the reader the opportunity to try out the practices presented in each chapter.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
This volume shows how to use ASP.NET, Visual Basic .NET, and Visual Studio .NET to build real-world business applications on the Web. Expert programmers Sheriff and Getz provide step-by-step instructions that illustrate how to build Web-based applications using ADO.NET, Web forms and Web Services in order to build client/server applications. Designed for experienced programmers, the 31 chapters proceed from an introduction to the Visual Basic .NET language to more advanced topics. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780672323577
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 4/28/2002
  • Pages: 672
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul D. Sheriff has over 17 years experience programming businessapplications. Paul is considered one of the leading Visual Basic programmers inthe industry. Paul has also been very active in the Visual Basic community. Hehas been the president of the Orange County Visual Basic User Group. He haswritten over 60 articles for many different publications and is a contributingeditor to Advisor magazine, writing many articles on Visual Basic 3, 4, 5, 6 and now VB .NET. Paul is the author of the Que book Paul Sheriff Teaches VisualBasic 6.0. Paul also speaks at the Advisor Publications Developer'sConferences, Microsoft Tech-Ed, and Microsoft Developer Days. Paul currently isthe Microsoft Regional Director for Southern California.

In 1991, Paul started PDSA, Inc., a high-level computer consulting companyspecializing in high-quality custom software. PDSA, Inc. is a Microsoft ManagedPartner. Since starting PDSA, Inc., Paul and his team have consulted in manydifferent industries, such as aerospace, real estate, medicine, hotel, andgovernment.

PDSA, Inc. is available for consulting work and onsite training in Visual Basic, SQL Server, and Internet/intranet applications. Contact PDSA, Inc. toll-free at (888) 899-PDSA (7372) or at (714) 734-9792. Fax: (714) 734-9793. E-mail: Psheriff@pdsa.com. Visit the PDSA Web site at http://www.pdsa.com.

Ken Getz is a senior consultant with MCW Technologies and splits his time between programming, writing, and training. He specializes in tools and applications written in Visual Studio .NET and Visual Basic. Ken is coauthor of several bestselling books, including Access 2002 Developer's Handbooks with Paul Litwin and Mike Gunderloy, Visual Basic Language Developer's Handbook with Mike Gilbert, and VBA Developer's Handbook with Mike Gilbert (Sybex). He cowrote several training courses for Application Developer's Training Company (http://www.appdev.com), including VB .NET, ASP.NET, Access 2000 and 97, Visual Basic 6, and Visual Basic 5 seminars. He has also recorded video training for AppDev covering VB .NET, ASP.NET, VB6, Access 2000, and Access 97. Ken is a frequent speaker at technical conferences and has spoken often at Microsoft's Tech-Ed conference. Ken also is a technical editor for Access-VB-SQL Advisor magazine and a columnist for Informant Publications' asp.netPRO magazine. You can reach Ken at keng@mcwtech.com, http://www.mcwtech.com, or at http://www.developershandbook.com.

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Read an Excerpt

The major benefit you will derive from reading this book is that you will be led, step by step, through the creation of a real-world-style business Web application that takes advantage of many of the new capabilities provided by the .NET platform. After reading this book, you will be able to program .NET applications using ADO.NET, Web Forms, and Web Services. Most of the books on the market do not address a real-world application, and most do not ever use a step-by-step approach. This book uses this approach so you can learn what you need in order to get your job done quicker and more efficiently. This will make your investment in this book pay off right from the beginning chapters.What Is the Purpose of This Book?

The purpose of this book is to show you how to use ASP.NET and Visual Studio .NET to build real-world business applications on the Web. We will show the practical applications of ASP.NET by illustrating how to build a client/server application using Web Forms and Web Services. Emphasis will be on good programming standards and practices. You will be taken from an introduction of the Visual Basic .NET language to intermediate topics through a step-by-step approach. This lets you try out the practices being set forth in this book.What This Book Isn't

Given the challenge of writing about a huge technology like Microsoft's .NET platform, we made specific decisions about what and what not to cover. With that in mind, this book is most definitely not a reference manual, and it is not a rehash of the Microsoft documentation. It is, however, a great place to start digging into the features and power of ASP.NET. The book is also not a resource on advancedfeatures—you'll find many other books that explain the things you'll want to dig into after you've learned the basics. We deliberately avoided topics that you don't need to know right away. Instead, we focused on topics you'll need right away to begin your exploration of ASP.NET and Web development using the .NET platform.Who Should Read This Book?

This book is designed for anyone who wants to learn how to create a business application using ASP.NET, HTML, and Internet Information Services (IIS). Throughout this book, you will be introduced to the concepts of the Microsoft .NET Framework, how to create a Web application using SQL Server, ASP.NET, ADO.NET, and Web Services, as well as good programming principles.Prerequisites

This book is designed for programmers who need to know how to program a Web application. If you are a programmer and/or Web designer who has some experience with VBScript or ColdFusion, you will get a lot out of this book. Even if you're not, there is enough in here to get you started. To get the most out of this book, it is recommended that you have experience using a programming language such as Visual Basic 6.0. Some experience with Visual Basic .NET would be helpful, but it's not required. You should also be familiar with relational database concepts and have access to the Northwind sample database that comes with SQL Server and Access. You must be familiar with Windows 2000, or later, and have access to Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Windows XP to effectively use this book. Familiarity with IIS is also recommended, because this book will assume you know how to set up virtual directories in IIS.Assumptions

You will need several tools at your disposal so you can try out the many exercises contained in this book. Here is a list of the tools you should have on your computer:


  • Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 or later or Microsoft Access
  • The Northwind sample database, which comes with SQL Server and Access
  • Microsoft Windows 2000, or XP
  • Microsoft .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR) Framework SDK
  • Microsoft Visual Studio .NET
  • Microsoft Mobile Internet Toolkit (optional)
Getting and Running .NET

The .NET Framework and the Visual Studio .NET IDE can both be purchased from many vendors, including directly from Microsoft. Although the .NET Framework will run on Microsoft Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, Windows 98 second edition, and Windows Millennium Edition (Windows Me), you'll need to have Windows NT with Service Pack 6, Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows .NET Server in order to develop applications. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 or later is required. For server-side installs, Microsoft Data Access Components 2.7 is required. You need at least a PII 450MHz processor with a minimum of 128MB of RAM and at least 800Yen600 resolution.

You will find that you need at least a PIII 650MHz processor with 384MB of RAM or better to be really productive. The more memory you have, the better off you will be. Given the choice, adding memory should have a higher priority than upgrading your processor.Making the Most of This Book

To download the examples discussed in this book, and to find updates and fixes, visit our Web site, http://www.pdsa.com/aspnetjumpstart. Because this book focuses on building an application that looks and feels like a simple business-oriented Web site, you'll get the flavor of the types of issues that will affect every ASP.NET developer. Rather than focusing on features or technology, we've focused on tasks and solutions. Although there may be other ways to accomplish some of the techniques we've proposed in this book, given the examples shown here, you'll have a running head start toward building your own sites and applications.

We suggest that you work your way through this book, from start to finish. There may be some chapters along the way that cover material you're already familiar with (for example, the chapters on HTML and

0672323575P04222002

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Table of Contents

(NOTE: Each chapter concludes with a Summary.)

Introduction.

I. INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT .NET AND ASP.NET.

1. Getting Started with the Sample Application.

Preparing for the Sample Application.

Installing the Examples.

Before You Get Started.

Introducing the Sample Application.

The Main Page.

The Login Page.

The Products Page.

The Employees and Orders Page.

The Employees (Stored Procedures) Page.

The Sales by Category Page.

The Edit Products Page.

The Product Details Page.

The Categories Page.

The Category Detail Page.

The Employee Information Page.

The Employee Maintenance Page.

The Change Password Page.

Using the Debugger.

Handling Errors.

Using the Framework Classes.

Using Other ASP.NET Controls.

Using the Mobile Internet Toolkit.

Using State Management.

Introducing Visual Basic .NET Language Basics.

2. Introduction to Microsoft .NET.

.NET and XML.

Overview of the .NET Framework.

The Common Language Runtime.

The .NET Classes.

Common Language Specification.

Intermediate Language.

Services in .NET.

Common Type System and Standard Data Types.

Types of Applications You Can Build.

Windows Applications.

Web Applications.

XML Web Services.

Class Libraries.

Types of Applications You Can Build.

Windows Applications.

Web Applications.

XML Web Services.

Class Libraries.

Migrating to .NET.

Migration Tools.

Reasons to Migrate.

Benefits of Using the .NET Framework.

What's in It for Users.

What's in It for Developers.

What's in It for Managers.

3. Introduction to Visual Studio .NET.

Configuring Visual Studio .NET.

The My Profile Page.

Visual Studio Start Page.

Creating a New Project.

Project Templates.

Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment (IDE).

Toolbox Window.

Solution Explorer Window.

Class View Window.

Server Explorer Window.

Properties Window.

Object Browser Window.

Task List Window.

Using Help.

Dynamic Help Window.

Contents Window.

Index Window.

Search Window.

Types of Windows.

Tool Windows.

Document Windows.

Using the Editor.

Using IntelliSense to Enter Code.

Splitting the Editing Window.

Finding Text.

Replacing Text.

Finding Text in All Project Files.

Replacing Text in All Project Files.

Searching for Symbols.

Incremental Searching.

Using Bookmarks to Locate Code.

Commenting/Uncommenting Blocks of Code.

Dragging and Dropping Text.

Word Wrapping.

Toggling Full Screen Mode.

Tabbing Between Windows.

Managing the Clipboard Using the Clipboard Ring.

Going Back.

Creating Macros.

4. Overview of .NET Framework Classes.

.NET Framework Namespaces.

The System Namespace.

A System.GC (Garbage Collection) Example

The System.Data Namespace.

The SqlClient and OleDb Namespaces.

The System.Data Classes.

A Data-Handling Example.

The System.IO Namespace.

A System.IO Example.

The System.Text Namespace.

A System.Text Example.

The System.Collections Namespace.

A System.Collections Example

The System.Web.Services Namespace.

A System.Web.Services Example.

The System.Xml Namespace.

A System.Xml Example.

5. Introduction to Internet Programming.

Internet Basics.

HTML Basics.

HTML Elements.

Creating Web Sites Before ASP.NET.

Using HTML to Create Sites.

Using ASP.

Web Sites Created Using ASP.NET.

Creating a New ASP.NET Application.

6. Introduction to ASP.NET.

Overview of ASP.NET.

Web Forms.

XML Web Services.

Introducing Web Form Controls.

HTML Controls.

Web Form Server Controls.

Field Validator Controls.

How Web Forms Work.

Internet Information Server (IIS) Objects.

The Response Object.

The Request Object.

The Session Object.

The Application Object.

The Server Object.

The global.asax File.

Creating User Controls.

Creating the Northwind Solution.

7. Working with ASP.NET and VB .NET.

Event-Handling Basics.

Interacting with the Server.

How Event Handling Works.

Data Types.

Option Strict.

Conversion Functions.

Constructing Text Using the String.Format Method.

Creating Your Own Procedures.

Creating Classes.

Applying What You Learned.

8. Validation Controls.

Requiring Data Entry.

Checking a Range.

Validating Expressions.

Creating Your Own Validation.

Summarizing Validation Messages.

Comparing Values.

9. Debugging in Visual Studio .NET.

Using the Debugger.

Three Modes of Existence.

Finding the Debug Toolbar.

Invoking the Debugger.

Stepping over Code.

Entering Break Mode.

The Stop Statement.

Introducing the Debugging Tools.

Using Breakpoints.

Breakpoints Toolbar.

Setting the Next Statement to Execute.

Useful Versus .NET Debugging Tools.

Watching Variables Using Your Mouse.

Watch Window.

Adding Watch Values Using QuickWatch.

Call Stack Window.

Using the Command Window.

Other Useful Debugging Windows.

Using the Debug Class.

The Assert Method.

The WriteLineIf Method.

Conditional Compilation.

Declaring a File-Level Compiler Constant.

Using Conditional Compilation Constants.

Declaring a Global Compiler Constant.

II. DATA HANDLING.

10. Introduction to ADO.NET.

Using ADO.NET Classes.

ADO.NET Namespaces.

Getting Started with ADO.NET.

Using a DataAdapter to Fill a DataSet.

Using a DataReader Object.

Benefits of ADO.NET.

11. Data Binding on Web Forms.

Creating a Sample Page.

Creating and Configuring a DataSet.

Displaying Your Data.

Adding the Grid.

Populating the DataGrid with Data.

Filling a DropDownList Control with Data.

Using the DropDownList Control to Filter by Categories.

12. Error Handling.

The Promise of Structured Exception Handling.

Using Exception Handling.

The Base Case: No Error Handling at All.

Adding a Simple Try/Catch Block.

Determining What Happened.

Working with Specific Exceptions.

The Exception Hierarchy.

Throwing Exceptions.

Error-Handling Options.

Using the Throw Keyword.

Searching for Handlers.

Passing Error Information.

Running Code Unconditionally.

Creating an Error Page.

13. ADO.NET Connection and Command Objects.

Providing ADO.NET Connection Information.

Using ADO.NET Connection Objects.

Adding Code to Retrieve and Display Data.

Investigating the CategoryAvgPrice Procedure's Code.

Updating Data Using a Command Object.

To Close or Not to Close?

14. Working with Data.

Using the DataReader Object.

Using a DataReader to Fill a DropDownList Control.

Filtering the Grid Based on Supplier ID

Retrieving Datasets Generically.

Using the GetDataSet Procedure.

Working with Relations in a Dataset.

Investigating the Relation-Handling Code.

Building the Relational DataSet.

Filtering the Grid Based on the Relation.

15. Using Stored Procedures with ADO.NET.

Setting Up the Sample Stored Procedures.

Adding Stored Procedures to the Database.

Loading the DataHandlerSqlClient Class.

Modifying Global.asax.

The OleDb Namespace and Stored Procedures.

Retrieving a List of All Employees.

Adding an Employee.

Deleting an Employee.

The SqlClient Namespace and Stored Procedures.

16. Using the DataGrid Control.

Adding Features to the DataGrid Control.

Loading the DataGrid Control with Data.

Formatting the DataGrid Control.

Creating the Columns.

Hooking Up the Data.

Loading the DataGrid Control.

Formatting Numeric Columns.

Enabling Paging.

Customizing the Pager.

Selecting a Row.

Sorting Columns.

17. Editing Data Using the DataGrid Control.

Project Setup.

Investigating the ProductsEdit Page.

Editing Data Using Links.

Adding a Hyperlink Column.

Editing Data on the Detail Page.

Editing Data on the Grid.

Beginning the Editing.

Saving the Data.

Cancelling the Edit.

Adding a Template Column.

Adding and Deleting Rows.

Adding a New Row.

Deleting a Row.

18. Using the Repeater Control.

How Does the Repeater Control Work?

Displaying Data.

Binding Data in Templates.

Hooking Up the Data.

Creating a Repeater.

Adding the Header and Footer Templates.

Adding the Data-Retrieval Code.

Adding the ItemTemplate Element.

Adding a Hyperlink.

More Advanced Repeater Features.

Creating the Detail Page.

Creating the ItemTemplate Element.

The AlternatingItem Template.

Adding the ItemCommand Event Procedure.

19. Using the DataList Control.

Project Setup.

Adding the Control's Data Source.

Adding the Full ItemTemplate.

Using the DataList Control's Properties.

Adding the EditItemTemplate Section.

Using the LinkButton Control Properties

Adding Event-Handling Code.

III. WEB DEVELOPMENT TECHNIQUES.

20. Using Crystal Reports.

Creating a Report.

Viewing the Report.

Creating a Report Viewer Page.

Displaying the Report.

Selecting Specific Rows.

21. Creating User Controls.

Creating a Header Control.

Creating a Navigation Control.

Creating More Complex User Controls.

Creating Properties.

Overriding the DataBind Method.

Using the Control.

Under the Hood.

Defining and Raising Events.

Allowing for Automatic Postback.

Retrieving the Selected Item.

Reacting to the Event.

22. Rich ASP.NET Controls.

The CheckBoxList and RadioButtonList Controls.

The Calendar Control.

Initializing the Calendar.

The AdRotator Control.

Filtering the AdRotator Control.

The Literal Control.

The PlaceHolder Control.

23. State Management in ASP.NET.

State Management Techniques in Brief.

The Session and Application Objects.

Cookies.

Hidden Input Fields.

Embedded URL Parameters.

The StateBag Class.

SQL Server.

Using the Session Object.

The Session and Application Objects.

Cookies.

Hidden Input Fields.

Embedded URL Parameters.

The StateBag Class.

SQL Server.

Using Cookies.

Permanent Cookies.

Issues with Cookies.

Using the ViewState Property.

Using the StateBag Object.

State Bag Issues.

Cookieless Sessions.

ASP.NET State Service.

Using a Separate State Server Machine.

Issues with the ASP.NET State Service.

Automatic SQL Server State Management.

Issues with Automatic SQL Server State Management

24. Introduction to Web Security.

Forms-Based Authentication.

Denying Anonymous Users.

Authenticating Employees.

Logging Out.

Supporting Authorization.

Using Web.Config.

Managing Authorization Dynamically.

Role-Based Authorization.

Using Identities and Principals.

Adding Support for Role-Based Authorization.

25. Creating Mobile Web Applications.

Introducing the Microsoft Mobile Internet Toolkit.

Testing Mobile Pages.

Handling Mobile Requests.

Controls Supplied by MMIT.

Creating a Page for Mobile Devices.

Creating the Page and First Two Forms.

Displaying Cities.

Navigating to the City Form.

Different Views.

Working with the ObjectList Control.

Setting Up Fields in the ObjectList Control.

Filling the ObjectList Control with Data.

Adding a Custom Command.

Adding Validation Controls

26. Development and Deployment Techniques.

Development Techniques.

Creating a Class Library.

Adding a Reference.

Accounting for Namespaces.

More on Namespaces.

Managing Assembly Information.

Deploying ASP.NET Applications.

XCOPY Deployment.

Windows Installer Deployment

IV. WEB SERVICES.

27. Introduction to XML.

The Power of XML.

What About HTML?

XML's Helpers

Getting Started with XML.

XML Element Rules.

XML Document Structure.

XML Schema.

28. Introduction to XML Web Services.

Web Service Requirements.

XML Web Services Then and Now.

Doing XML Web Services the Hard Way.

Doing XML Web Services the Easy Way.

Web Services in Action.

29. Creating and Consuming XML Web Services.

Creating a Simple XML Web Service.

Testing the Web Service.

Consuming a Web Service.

Creating a Client Application.

Creating a Useful Web Service.

Returning a DataSet from a Web Service.

30. Investigating Web Service Consumers.

Consuming a Web Service Synchronously.

The Sample Web Service.

Calling the Web Service.

What's Going On?

Consuming a Web Service Asynchronously.

Adding the Method Call.

What's Going On?

31. Securing Web Services.

Security Mechanisms.

Using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL).

Using IIS.

Using ASP.NET.

Windows Integrated Authentication.

Authentication Modes.

Authorization of Users.

Custom SOAP Authentication.

Creating a SOAP Header Class.

Calling the SOAP Method.

Client Certificates.

IP Address Restriction.

V. APPENDIX.

Appendix A. Programming Standards.

Setting Up Your Environment.

Computer Setup.

Visual Studio .NET Options.

Option Strict.

Naming Conventions.

Naming Variables.

Naming Controls and Menus.

Naming ADO.NET Objects.

Coding Conventions.

Naming Data Structures.

Naming Procedures.

Commenting Your Code.

Indentation.

Index.

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Preface

The major benefit you will derive from reading this book is that you will be led, step by step, through the creation of a real-world-style business Web application that takes advantage of many of the new capabilities provided by the .NET platform. After reading this book, you will be able to program .NET applications using ADO.NET, Web Forms, and Web Services. Most of the books on the market do not address a real-world application, and most do not ever use a step-by-step approach. This book uses this approach so you can learn what you need in order to get your job done quicker and more efficiently. This will make your investment in this book pay off right from the beginning chapters.

What Is the Purpose of This Book?

The purpose of this book is to show you how to use ASP.NET and Visual Studio .NET to build real-world business applications on the Web. We will show the practical applications of ASP.NET by illustrating how to build a client/server application using Web Forms and Web Services. Emphasis will be on good programming standards and practices. You will be taken from an introduction of the Visual Basic .NET language to intermediate topics through a step-by-step approach. This lets you try out the practices being set forth in this book.

What This Book Isn't

Given the challenge of writing about a huge technology like Microsoft's .NET platform, we made specific decisions about what and what not to cover. With that in mind, this book is most definitely not a reference manual, and it is not a rehash of the Microsoft documentation. It is, however, a great place to start digging into the features and power of ASP.NET. The book is also not a resource on advanced features--you'll find many other books that explain the things you'll want to dig into after you've learned the basics. We deliberately avoided topics that you don't need to know right away. Instead, we focused on topics you'll need right away to begin your exploration of ASP.NET and Web development using the .NET platform.

Who Should Read This Book?

This book is designed for anyone who wants to learn how to create a business application using ASP.NET, HTML, and Internet Information Services (IIS). Throughout this book, you will be introduced to the concepts of the Microsoft .NET Framework, how to create a Web application using SQL Server, ASP.NET, ADO.NET, and Web Services, as well as good programming principles.

Prerequisites

This book is designed for programmers who need to know how to program a Web application. If you are a programmer and/or Web designer who has some experience with VBScript or ColdFusion, you will get a lot out of this book. Even if you're not, there is enough in here to get you started. To get the most out of this book, it is recommended that you have experience using a programming language such as Visual Basic 6.0. Some experience with Visual Basic .NET would be helpful, but it's not required. You should also be familiar with relational database concepts and have access to the Northwind sample database that comes with SQL Server and Access. You must be familiar with Windows 2000, or later, and have access to Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Windows XP to effectively use this book. Familiarity with IIS is also recommended, because this book will assume you know how to set up virtual directories in IIS.

Assumptions

You will need several tools at your disposal so you can try out the many exercises contained in this book. Here is a list of the tools you should have on your computer:

  • Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 or later or Microsoft Access
  • The Northwind sample database, which comes with SQL Server and Access
  • Microsoft Windows 2000, or XP
  • Microsoft .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR) Framework SDK
  • Microsoft Visual Studio .NET
  • Microsoft Mobile Internet Toolkit (optional)

Getting and Running .NET

The .NET Framework and the Visual Studio .NET IDE can both be purchased from many vendors, including directly from Microsoft. Although the .NET Framework will run on Microsoft Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, Windows 98 second edition, and Windows Millennium Edition (Windows Me), you'll need to have Windows NT with Service Pack 6, Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows .NET Server in order to develop applications. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 or later is required. For server-side installs, Microsoft Data Access Components 2.7 is required. You need at least a PII 450MHz processor with a minimum of 128MB of RAM and at least 800Yen600 resolution.

You will find that you need at least a PIII 650MHz processor with 384MB of RAM or better to be really productive. The more memory you have, the better off you will be. Given the choice, adding memory should have a higher priority than upgrading your processor.

Making the Most of This Book

To download the examples discussed in this book, and to find updates and fixes, visit our Web site, http://www.pdsa.com/aspnetjumpstart. Because this book focuses on building an application that looks and feels like a simple business-oriented Web site, you'll get the flavor of the types of issues that will affect every ASP.NET developer. Rather than focusing on features or technology, we've focused on tasks and solutions. Although there may be other ways to accomplish some of the techniques we've proposed in this book, given the examples shown here, you'll have a running head start toward building your own sites and applications.

We suggest that you work your way through this book, from start to finish. There may be some chapters along the way that cover material you're already familiar with (for example, the chapters on HTML and XML). In that case, skim on past. Don't worry about missing out on steps in building the sample application--we've included, along with the sample application, a finished version of the application after each chapter. If you skip a chapter, you can simply copy the contents of the finished version for the chapter into your working folder. (See Chapter 1, "Getting Started with the Sample Application," for more details.) In a perfect world, after working through the examples in each chapter, you would take the time to review the documentation on the objects and techniques covered and then add your own functionality to the application.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2002

    Great ASP.NET Book, perhaps, the BEST!

    This book will help you on developing real world applications. It will not waste your time giving you examples of codes, that you will never need or implement in your life. Even though, the book says 'developers jumpstart' you don't need to be experience on with .NET. The book is great for starters with the .NET Framework, as long as the starter is serious and disciplined to learn it. You will just need experience on any object-oriented language. If you know VB it will be great. This book is a most buy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2002

    Highly Recommended

    If you are a VB/VBA developer you already know the names Ken Getz and Paul Sheriff. If you¿ve been at it a while, you probably already have `borrowed¿ some of their code for your own applications. ¿ASP.Net Developer¿s JumpStart¿ is a good solid reference and ¿how to¿ manual focused on the Visual Basic approach to ASP.Net. VBers will be immediately comfortable with the straight foreword style, simple examples and (refreshing) the VB style naming conventions. If your heritage is a case sensitive language (where Book and book are two different things), if you like to see lots of curly braces and overworked punctuation, then you really need this book to see how easy it is for the rest of us. Pat Tormey PE, New England C# Users Group

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