Assessing Learning: Librarians and Teachers as Partners / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$31.61
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 95%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $28.35   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   

Overview

Focusing on the role of library media specialists in assessing student learning, this is the first full-length book written to address its practical application in the school library media center. It is an important book for school librarians to consider as they address their role as teachers in schools and the accountability issues associated with that role. It places students at the center of the assessment equation and addresses the following topics as they relate specifically to school library instructional programs: purposes of assessment, essential elements of assessment, knowing what to assess, multiple methods for assessment, and management and communication of assessment results. The book's primary audiences are library media specialists and teachers in K-12 settings. It is also relevant for other educators, who are centrally involved in K-12 programs including district, regional and state library media coordinators, building level administrators, and library school educators. The authors cull from their own 30-year careers as library practitioners, university instructors, and workshop presenters to present doable, practical methods for the library media specialist to be involved in assessing student learning. Though this topic appears in the theoretical literature and is addressed in journal articles or chapters in contributed books, this is the first practical in-depth analysis for the school library field.

Focusing on the role of library media specialists in assessing student learning, this is the first full-length book written to address its practical application in the school library media center. It is an important book for school librarians to consider as they address their role as teachers in schools and the accountability issues associated with that role. It places students at the center of the assessment equation and addresses the following topics as they relate specifically to school library instructional programs: purposes of assessment, essential elements of assessment, knowing what to assess, multiple methods for assessment, and management and communication of assessment results. The book's primary audiences are library media specialists and teachers in K-12 settings. It is also relevant for other educators, who are centrally involved in K-12 programs including district, regional and state library media coordinators, building level administrators, and library school educators. The authors cull from their own 30-year careers as library practitioners, university instructors, and workshop presenters to present doable, practical methods for the library media specialist to be involved in assessing student learning. Though this topic appears in the theoretical literature and is addressed in journal articles or chapters in contributed books, this is the first practical in-depth analysis for the school library field. Grades K-12.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"[T]hese two experienced Hawaii librarians offer terrific ideas at all grade levels for assessing (formatively) and evaluating (summatively) both our work and that of our students. After reviewing the topic of assessment, the authors look at library media centers to determine where and how students should be assessed and then examine assessment tools and explain a wide array of effective graphic organizers. In a flashback to excellent outcome-based learning strategies (renamed backward planning), they detail units for elementary, middle, and high schools using varied assessments, most extensively student portfolios….While newer teacher-librarians may learn some of these strategies in library school, veterans should be excited at possibilities that they may never have considered, thus providing much-needed injections of clear, accessible, exciting instruction into their lives as well as those of their students"

-

School Library Journal

"The question now is: How do we assess student learing in the context of the school media center? This is the first book to answer this question. K-12 media specialists will find this book invaluable in understanding and implementing assessment of student learning and achievement. Each chapter begins with an overview and key questions that are answered in the reading, and ends with an extensive list of print and Internet references….Recommended."

-

Library Media Connection

"One of the most important books of the year on assessment. Highly recommended."

-

Teacher Librarian

"School library media specialists will find the practical tools they need to assess student learning in this book. Included are useful checklists, rubrics, logs, graphic organizers, examples of student portfolios, and sample lessons for all levels. The book also covers how to communicate results to teachers, administrators, and the larger community."

-

Curriculum Connections

School Library Journal
Clearly defying the conventional myth that teaching librarians do not (and need not) assess the results of their instruction, these two experienced Hawaii librarians offer terrific ideas at all grade levels for assessing (formatively) and evaluating (summatively) both our work and that of our students. After reviewing the topic of assessment, the authors look at library media centers to determine where and how students should be assessed and then examine assessment tools and explain a wide array of effective graphic organizers. In a flashback to excellent outcome-based learning strategies (renamed backward planning), they detail units for elementary, middle, and high schools using varied assessments, most extensively student portfolios. Finally, they discuss ways of collecting, analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating the learning to various stakeholders. Close to 100 illustrations demonstrate the many forms of assessment described. Chapters are well constructed and the writing is clear, though sticklers for style may tire of the ubiquitous organizational convention of asking/answering questions. While newer teacher-librarians may learn some of these strategies in library school, veterans should be excited at possibilities that they may never have considered, thus providing much-needed injections of clear, accessible, exciting instruction into their lives as well as those of their students.-Mary R. Hofmann, Rivera Middle School, Merced, CA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591582007
  • Publisher: Libraries Unlimited
  • Publication date: 6/30/2005
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 170
  • Product dimensions: 9.21 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Meet the Author

VIOLET H. HARADA is Professor of Library and Information Science at the University of Hawaii where she also coordinates the specialization for school library media preparation. In her 35-year career she has been a secondary English teacher, an elementary school library media specialist, a state level administrator, and a curriculum designer. In her current research and publications, she focuses on inquiry-based approaches to information seeking and use and on the dynamics of collaborative instruction. With Joan M. Yoshina, she is the co-author of Learning Through Inquiry: Librarian-Teacher Partnerships.

JOAN M. YOSHINA recently retired from the Hawaii Department of Education after 34 years as an elementary and high school teacher, a language arts specialist, and a library media specialist. She worked in both elementary and middle school libraries in Oahu. Joan has also published articles on the information search process and integrated instruction, guest lectured at the University of Hawaii, and presented her work at both state and national conferences.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Assessment in today's school 1
Ch. 2 Assessment in the library media center 10
Ch. 3 Tools for assessment : checklists, rubrics, and rating scales 19
Ch. 4 Tools for assessments : conferences, logs, and personal correspondence 31
Ch. 5 Tools for assessment : graphic organizers 49
Ch. 6 Beginning with the end in mind : elementary grade example 68
Ch. 7 Beginning with the end in mind : middle school example 81
Ch. 8 Beginning with the end in mind : high school example 92
Ch. 9 Student portfolios 106
Ch. 10 Communicating evidence of learning 125
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)