Asylum [NOOK Book]

Overview

Once you get in, there's no getting out.

For sixteen-year-old Dan Crawford, a summer program for gifted students is the chance of a lifetime. No one else at his high school gets his weird fascinations with history and science, but at the New Hampshire College Prep program, such quirks are all but required.

Dan arrives to find that the usual summer housing has been closed, forcing students to stay in the crumbling Brookline dorm—formerly a ...

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Asylum

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Overview

Once you get in, there's no getting out.

For sixteen-year-old Dan Crawford, a summer program for gifted students is the chance of a lifetime. No one else at his high school gets his weird fascinations with history and science, but at the New Hampshire College Prep program, such quirks are all but required.

Dan arrives to find that the usual summer housing has been closed, forcing students to stay in the crumbling Brookline dorm—formerly a psychiatric hospital. As Dan and his new friends Abby and Jordan start exploring Brookline's twisty halls and hidden basement, they uncover disturbing secrets about what really went on here . . . secrets that link Dan and his friends to the asylum's dark past. Because it turns out Brookline was no ordinary psych ward. And there are some secrets that refuse to stay buried.

Featuring haunting found photographs from real asylums, this mind-bending reading experience blurs the lines between past and present, friendship and obsession, genius and insanity.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Recently graduated from a high school where he never fitted in, Dan Crawford finds a happy new home at New Hampshire College Prep-or so he first thinks. It's true that he becomes close friends almost immediately with fellow students Abby and Jordan, but at the outset, none of them fully realized that their dorm's previous function as an asylum for the criminally insane was not just a fascinating fact; it was a history that continues to insinuate itself into the present. A suspenseful, cleverly creepy novel by Zombie series author Madeleine Roux. Now in trade paperback. (P.S. This fiction's allure is enhanced by its eerie photographs and simulated journals.)

Publishers Weekly
08/26/2013
Horror author Roux makes a strong YA debut with this creepy tale of a haunted asylum and the teenagers who are drawn to it. When Dan Crawford attends a summer program at New Hampshire College, he ends up housed in Brookline, a former asylum now being turned into a dorm. Along with fellow students Abby and Jordan, he starts exploring the basement of the dorm, where (conveniently) old records are stored. As they investigate, the students are plagued by horrifying dreams, and Dan starts to have blackouts, discovering strange unsent texts and emails and learning about conversations that he doesn't remember. Students are being attacked in the dorms, and as Dan begins to unravel his own ties to the asylum, he wonders if he might be responsible for the crimes. Roux (aided by unsettling photo illustrations of abandoned asylums and tormented patients) creates an entertaining and occasionally brutal horror story that reveals the enduring impact of buried trauma and terror on a place. Open questions at the end invite a sequel, though there's also a good sense of closure. Ages 14–up. Agent: Kate McKean, Howard Morhaim Literary Agency. (Aug.)
Tor.com
“Madeleine Roux’s Asylum takes the fondest dream of our collective nerdy childhood and handily turns it into the scariest collective nightmare.” — Tor.com
Glamour
“I started reading this one at my desk in broad daylight and still got goose bumps.” — Glamour
Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)
“Illustrations used in this book are from actual asylums, and the author builds the tension nicely as Dan receives what may be messages from an inmate. A good choice for readers who enjoy books with scary situations that lead to a solid climax.”
Heather Brewer
“Days after reading Asylum, I’m still haunted by the images that Madeleine Roux’s words conjured. I just want to curl up inside her skull and exist for a while in its dark, twisted magnificence. Brilliant!”
Booklist
“The plentiful illustrations both advance the story line and immeasurably contribute to the spooky atmosphere. With its abundant jump scares, horror readers and fans of the TV show American Horror Story will delight in the fast-paced plot.”
VOYA - Betsy Fraser
Brookline was not quite what Dan Crawford had been expecting; while he had really been looking forward to spending the summer taking college prep courses, perhaps the crumbling facade of the student dorm should have been an omen. Their school plans change when Dan, his roommate, Felix, and their friend, Abby, stumble across some incredibly creepy photographs in an abandoned office on their first day. Further investigation leads them to find out that their dorm used to be a psychiatric hospital housing and treating dangerous criminals, and brings a more malevolent mystery when Dan starts receiving mysterious messages. It seems as though their investigation may be in danger of bringing things to light that would be safer in the past. Illustrations used in this book are from actual asylums, and the author builds the tension nicely as Dan receives what may be messages from an inmate. He is the only character of the three to be receiving the messages, as the background for his classmate is explained and handled neatly. This would be a good choice for readers who enjoy books with scary situations that lead to a solid climax, like Graham McNamee's Acceleration (Little,Brown, 2003/Voya December 2003), or a horror title with teens facing a threat like McNamee's Bonechiller (Little, Brown, 2008). Reviewer: Betsy Fraser
School Library Journal
02/01/2014
Gr 9 Up—Dan is thrilled to be spending the summer before his senior year at the New Hampshire College Prep program, where he'll have a chance to meet other studious teenagers. He doesn't mind that his dorm, Brookline, was once an asylum for the criminally insane. In fact, Dan is curious about the institution's history and begins exploring Brookline's old passageways at night. At first, Dan and his best friends at NHCP, Abby and Jordan, think it's fun to sneak around in the dark and look at old patient records, but soon the things they find begin to frighten them. Dan starts receiving ominous notes, and he is plagued by nightmares in which he sees Brookline as if he were really there, all those years ago. When people start dying, Dan is convinced that the killer's identity is buried in his dorm's darkest history and that his own strange connection to the institution may be the key to stopping the murders. Eerie black-and-white pictures throughout the book add to the creep factor of this story, but unfortunately many images are redundant photographs of Dan's notes, while others seem unrelated to the text. The plot drives forward too quickly, with some circumstances and events feeling forced. Dan meets Abby and Jordan on his first day, for instance, and within hours they carry on with the rapport of lifelong friends. Mystery lovers will be disappointed with the lack of answers and explanations here. Hand this one to horror fans who don't mind a few loose ends.—Liz Overberg, Darlington School, Rome, GA
Kirkus Reviews
Roux's first teen novel uses horror staples--spooky corridors, tight-lipped townspeople and convenient coincidences--to predictable but page-turning effect. New Hampshire College Prep is a haven for gifted students: a place where kids actually want to do their homework. Its Brookline dorm is also a former psychiatric hospital whose past remains prominent not only in town, but in its own abandoned wings. Dan, anxious and awkward, is fascinated by its most infamous inpatient: a serial killer dubbed the Sculptor. His classmates have their own troubles; Abby struggles with family tensions, and Jordan's parents reject his sexuality. When they find old patient records and receive ghostly emails, they begin an investigation that ends in murder. The mock photo illustrations are eerie and occasionally disturbing, depicting the callous treatment methods of Brookline's time. A hollow-eyed, scarred child begs for her own story, as do notes from a surgeon convinced he can eradicate insanity. In contrast, the teens' back stories are more plot devices and heavy foreshadowing than character development, but their friendship is convincingly volatile. Real and ghostly elements mix clumsily and muddle the ending somewhat, but the pictures linger--a tighter focus on the photos' subjects could have made a truly haunting story. Fans of "found footage" horror will enjoy this familiar but visually creepy take on the haunted-institution setting. (Suspense. 14-18)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062220981
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/20/2013
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 1,560
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • File size: 15 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Madeleine Roux

Madeleine Roux is the New York Times bestselling author of Asylum, which has sold into nine countries around the world and which Publishers Weekly called "a strong YA debut." Sanctum is the second installment in the series about Dan, Abby, and Jordan. Madeleine is also the author of Alison Hewitt Is Trapped and Sadie Walker Is Stranded. A graduate of the Beloit College MFA program, Madeleine now lives in Minnesota.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 85 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(30)

4 Star

(21)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(11)

1 Star

(11)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 85 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2013

    Disappointing

    I was excited about the plot and use of photos. I couldn't wait to read the book being compaired to Miss Peregrin's Home for Peculiar Children. Unfortunatly, this book fell short of expectations. The characterization tried to be dynamic but instead the characters came across as unfleshed out. I never had a grasp on who they were supposed to be. The use of photos was strange because they didn't run congruently with the text, they seemed random at times. Further more, the end (and I promise not to spoil) was not a satisfactory resolution to the plot and didn't provide a compelling cliff hanger for a sequel. I have since learned this is the first in a series but I will not be reading the subsequent books.

    23 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Very, very disappointing. The book was so badly written that I

    Very, very disappointing. The book was so badly written that I could not suspend reality at all and the story just ended up being silly. This is a shame since it is a very good plot line. The pictures could have easily been left out as they added very little to the story. I was also very disappointed that Ms. Roux gave no thanks or credit to Ransom Rees, who had an excellent "picture" book with Ms. Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, which was actually written around real, unusual pictures. It is also pretty obvious that Ms. Roux did no research on how lobotomies were performed. If she had, she would have found out that they were done through the eye socket - NOT through the forehead. The characters were all, except for poor Lucy, one-dimensional and extraordinarily self-centered who were constantly throwing fits when they did not get their way. All in all they were all very pathetic. This could have been a very good the hands of a better writer or even a better editor. As it is, well, this is just my opinion, but it pretty much sucked.

    14 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    Seriously, did the author literally write all of the five star r

    Seriously, did the author literally write all of the five star reviews herself.  This is the deal with this book, it did set up some good storyline but it was not executed properly!  The author could not write or get into the mind of a teenage boy, she write that the main character is socially awkward but gets best friends not soon after that statement.  She makes one of the characters gay so she can relate her novel to the LGBTQ community but that's it.  She just says that he's gay and doesn't go farther than that.  I seriously hope that the writer goes back to school or at least find herself another job.  I usually don't hate books but this book, oh this book is seriously a waste of money.  The author is seriously trying to rip off Miss Peregrine's home for pecular children! 

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 1, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    After hearing about this at the Frenzy Presents event, I really

    After hearing about this at the Frenzy Presents event, I really wanted to read it!! A horror book that includes pictures from a real life asylum, talk about spooky!! Sixteen year old Dan is the main protagonist in this book. Dan leaves his house to go to New Hampshire College prep that is a summer program. Dan has never had any friends at school, so he was determined to make some at his summer program! He meets Abby and Jordan, and those three go on quite an adventure at school. They find hidden rooms at their school, and the decide to go in and explore. When they find weird and scary pictures of doctors and patients, Dan and Abby are determined to find out more.To be honest, I didn't find this as creepy as I expected it to be. The story line wasn't that interesting, and nothing exciting ever came up at first. Later on, some shocking stuff did happen, and the book started picking it's pace up. The pictures in the book were pretty cool as well. I have to admit, there was a lot of confusing stuff here. I'm still not clear about what really happened in the end. I thought there would be a sequel, but it does not say so on goodreads. The characters were okay, nothing special. Also, there was a bit romance, but it didn't stand out for me either.Overall, I just guess this book was bleh. Nothing great, nothing horrible either. I kind of think this turned out into a big mess in the end. I don't know if it's paranormal or fantasy or whatnot. Nothing was explained properly, and if there isn't a sequel, then how are we supposed to understand? If anyone is looking for a somewhat horror book, then I would recommend this one. I also thought it would be fit for a younger audience as well. 

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2014

    Poorly executed

    The photos are easily located on the internet.

    Boring book with some misuse of psychiatric labels. Hated this.

    And the characters were flat and uninteresting.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    Not bad

    After reading Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children, I was so excited to read this. I did like the real photos and the plot. However I was not very satisfied with the ending, I felt like there were a lot of questions unanswered.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 31, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Curious for a mysterious and spooky read, I picked up this book

    Curious for a mysterious and spooky read, I picked up this book wanting to be entranced. It took me down some strange halls that I would never forget.

    Pictures: First, I want to talk about the pictures that came along with the story. I loved them. I felt it gave the story a more 3-d. Like you can read the story but a visual is placed in front of you as well. Some pictures were interesting while others were well creepy. Still, I enjoyed turning the page and looking at long past history.

    Plot: One of my fave movies to watch during this season is House On Haunted Hill both the old and new version. I adore the whole premise of vengeful spirits luring back their heirs to a place that has gone mad. This story carries a similar plot. I loved every bit of piecing together the mysterious clues of the staff and the coincidence of clues left for others to follow.

    Love/Friendship: Since this is a thriller read, there isn’t much romance but it did carry a good flirtation feel that gives the book that right amount of peace. There are creepy moments then two characters get real and get to know each other, smiling. I loved that. The friendships formed have more than what the reader sees. I love reading the story and watching it unfold secret by secret before my eyes.

    This is a great story of mystery and mayhem. Lots of scary tales of the old building, told by the townspeople, give this story dimension. The pictures add a great affect to visualizing the world that is being built for the reader. Ultimately an intriguing read that you can not put down, Asylum is perfect for Halloween!

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

    Highly forgettable

    I love books of this genre, sadly this book didn't thrill me. I am a huge Ransom Riggs fan and ASYLUM just came across as a poorly written wannabe. It was a fast read only because I couldn't wait for it to be over. I recommend that if you are a Riggs fan, you pass on ASYLUM.......and if even if you aren't.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2014

    Fantastic

    I loved Asylum! I loved how Madeleline Roux developed the plot into something somewhat dangerous. I honestly hated who the killer was (spoilers). Overall, it was a thrilling book. Highly suggested read. Caution: don't read at night.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2014

    Asylum

    Very well written. Loved the story. Unexpected events left and right. I will definately read the sequel,

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 28, 2014

    I seem to be reading a lot of books lately that leaves me with m

    I seem to be reading a lot of books lately that leaves me with mixed feelings. Sadly, Asylum ended up being one of those books that starts off intensely suspenseful, bringing on the chills in quick succession, but soon losing momentum.

    The only elements driving this story, and which also kept me riveted, are the endless questions and guess work that goes into the who, what, where, and when. Is Dan crazy? Is it a long-forgotten escaped mental patient that wasn’t accounted for when Brookline was closed down who are committing all these shocking murders? Could it be a copycat murderer impersonating the serial killer known as The Sculptor? Or, is it just a matter of the evil mental institution warden reincarnated into the body of the mentally unstable protagonist who happens to be his namesake? You see? All of these questions are more than enough to keep you turning the pages to find out why Brookline was closed down in the late 1960s, what sort of grisly experiments were done on the mental patients, and why all these weird and unexplainable things are happening to Abby, Jordan, and Dan. And you know what else? I STILL DON’T KNOW WHAT HAPPENED!!!

    It all sounds interesting enough, but the big reveal (which went completely over my head) felt a little rushed and for me it wasn’t such a “wow” reveal at all. The issue I have with Asylum is that it builds up the reader’s expectation for a magnificent conclusion, but then it fails to deliver. I still had a multitude of questions that weren’t answered by the time I turned the final page. And I was also left with a sense of “what the heck just happened?”. Maybe I’m just a bit slow, but I was confused by most of what was happening throughout the book, yet still holding out hope that all will be explained at the end of the story.

    But, Asylum does have a few good things going for it, which is why I’m giving it a solid three-star rating:

    A male protagonist (books in YA with a male voice are so few and far apart, it’s actually worth mentioning).
    The photos added to the sinister undertone of the story, and made it feel real.
    No love-triangle or romantic angst, but just a tiny hint of romance in the first half of the book. Nothing noteworthy though.

    To sum it up: Asylum had a disappointing conclusion for me, but still it was an intriguing read as the author built up the suspense expertly. Maybe I just need to reread it again in case I missed that one clue that would help me understand the ending – or, in fact, the whole point of the story. The characters were rather bland, and I struggled to care about them. I did, however, enjoy that this is a psychological thriller for YA readers as there are so few books of this sort in this genre. Asylum is a book I’ll recommend to fans of Kendare Blake’s Anna Dressed in Blood, though that was a way better book than this one, but the feel of this novel is the same as Anna’s. It started off as a promising read, but quickly slowed down and left me disappointed with the conclusion. The ending felt like drinking the last dregs of a cup of tea that had gone cold really quickly. The story had potential and I would of course want to read more books by this author, but sadly, I don’t think I’ll be recommending this one to any of my friends.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2013

    Loved it!!!

    Great reading- it kept me on my toes

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2013

    O.K

    The story was great and the pictures were really creepy! But I'm still reading the book and what needs to be modified for like a sequal or another book, the narrater ( I can't really spell it) sounds like no one in the WHOLE story. Its sort of uncomfertable and sometimes confusing. But other than that its a really good book!

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2013

    Gargamel

    Not sure if really long creepypasta, or just a creepy story. But whatever it is, your doing it right!!!<p>I just have one little thing: I wish i knew the main character's name. Other than that, very well written!!!

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 20, 2013

    Hmmm...

    I was super excited to read this book, but I'm about 1/2 way through it and am mildly disappointed. It seems to be written at more of a YA level. I feel like I'm reading a book that is trying to be eerie and suspenseful, but is falling short. The photographs are interesting, but not integrated well within the story. Overall rating 2/5.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2013

    Disappointed

    Asylum had a promising idea for a plot- a former mental hospital whose ghosts of its past are haunting current-day tennants, a group of kids taking college courses. But, in my opinion, it was less a horror story than it was just a story. As other reviews have noted, the pictures didn't always match up with what was being said and seemed out of place, so as a result, they didn't do all that much to add atmosphere to the tale. Often, what was meant to be scary or creepy was just confusing. Ms. Roux seemed to have taken a variety of good ideas and mashed them together in a fairly poor fashion. As I described it to a friend- the end strikes me as though it's trying to be a mix of the game Mad Father, the more serious or creepy aspects of the television show Supernatural, and the atmosphere of just about any horror game taking place in a mental hospital, like the game Afraid of Monsters. These are all good ideas, and when put together in the correct way in the correct form, could end up being very scary or haunting indeed. It just wasn't put together correctly, and the way the characters were used as the means

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2013

    Asylum

    Very creepy and compelling once you get through the initial intro and set-up.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2014

    A very interesting book

    The end of it was something I did not expect. Yet it did help me think of new things to add to my own writing. I find that insanity, asylums, and slight drama can make a book interesting.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2014

    Overall, I was disappointed in Asylum, which is a shame as the


    Overall, I was disappointed in Asylum, which is a shame as the cover looked so promising!  The entire novel had some good ideas, but it felt like Roux was testing the waters of authorship rather than diving in headfirst.  Although billed as a photo novel, I did not find the pictures to enhance, but detract from the storyline, they appeared to be poor reproductions or B grade PhotoShop examples.  This book was alright, I am interested in reading the second installment solely to discover if Roux developed the suggestions of Asylum. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2014

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    1 out of 35 people found this review helpful.

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