At Fenway: Dispatches from Red Sox Nation

At Fenway: Dispatches from Red Sox Nation

by Dan Shaughnessy
     
 

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Seeing baseball played at Fenway is an experience like no other for Red Sox fans and rivals alike because the park reminds us of what baseball used to be.  Fenway may not offer fans the best seats or even adequate parking, but when game-goers walk through the park's gate, the smell of hotdogs and roasted peanuts, the sight of Fenway's brilliant green grass…  See more details below

Overview

Seeing baseball played at Fenway is an experience like no other for Red Sox fans and rivals alike because the park reminds us of what baseball used to be.  Fenway may not offer fans the best seats or even adequate parking, but when game-goers walk through the park's gate, the smell of hotdogs and roasted peanuts, the sight of Fenway's brilliant green grass and the roar of the Fenway faithful overwhelms the most jaded of baseball enthusiasts, even Yankee fans.

At Fenway celebrates the rich history of Fenway Park home to the Boston Red Sox. Told through the wit and perceptions of Dan Shaughnessy, sports columnist for the Boston Globe and one of New England's most admired sportswriters, At Fenway is the writer's hometown tribute to the park how growing up with Fenway and the Red Sox affected his life and the lives of the many die-hard fans living in "Red Sox Nation."  Author of The Curse of the Bambino, Shaughnessy takes readers on a walking tour of the fabled park itself, exploring every nook and cranny that makes Fenway unique. He traces the early history of Fenway from the day owner John I. Taylor broke ground for its construction in 1911 to the building material that went into the making of Fenway's "Green Monster" wall.  In addition, Shaughnessy introduces readers to some of the unrecognized figures who keep Fenway's cherished traditions alive, including Helen Robinson, who has operated the park's switchboard for more than half a century, and head groundskeeper Joe Mooney, who "protects and defends the green, green grass of Fenway Park."

A book that uniquely captures the spirit of Fenway Park and what it means to be a Boston Red Sox fan, At Fenway also explores the "good, bad, and ugly" moments that have nurtured Fenway's love-hate relationship with fans.  From the dark day of January 5, 1920, when Babe Ruth left the Red Sox to play for the Yankees, to the Red Sox's 1967 Cinderella-story pennant victory; from Carlton Fisk's 1975 World Series home run to the crowd-silencing homer Bucky Dent hit that clinched the Yankees' 1978 playoff birth, At Fenway recalls the park's greatest and worst moments and talks with the players who created them.

Rumors that the Red Sox will close Fenway in a few years have already provoked outrage among the faithful.  Closing Fenway will mark the end of an era, and Dan Shaughnessy captures this era in all its tragic glory.  At Fenway will be read and cherished by Red Sox fans and all fans of baseball as it ought to be.


From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Shaughnessy's (One Strike Away) memoir about the Boston Red Sox and their home field, Fenway Park, is baseball from the heart. Throughout the book there are reminiscences about Fenway; many fans recall youths spent watching the Sox with their mothers and fathers and what this special baseball bond means to them. Shaughnessy recalls the history of Fenway-the park opened the week the Titanic sank in 1912; the left-field wall came to be dubbed the Green Monster because of its color-and exposes the management's lie about the length of the line to left (it is not 315 feet; Shaughnessy measured it at 309 feet, 3 inches). He takes a rapid look at Sox history: how the club was the last team to integrate (it had the first shot at both Jackie Robinson and Willie Mays and rejected them); and how the 1986 loss to the Mets in the World Series reminded fans of the infamous Curse of the Bambino (Bruce Hurst was the starting pitcher in the seventh game of the '86 series; a rearrangement of the letters in his name indicated "B. Ruth Curse!"). A lovely memoir that will leave baseball fans hoping that the long-suffering Sox will eventually win the big one. (May)
Library Journal
Shaughnessy (The Curse of the Bambino, Dutton, 1990) has written an entertaining if sometimes self-indulgent yarn on the Red Sox mystique. He revels in recounting player controversies of the recent past while showing why the Red Sox are the first love of New Englanders. Regional fans will enjoy this tale that reads like a heralded feature in a Sunday newspaper's sport section.
Wes Lukowsky
"Boston Globe" sportswriter Shaughnessy is a lifelong New Englander, so when he writes about the Red Sox, as he did so well in "The Curse of the Bambino" (1990), he provides the unique perspective of a long-suffering hometowner. While "Bambino" was a stylized history of the Beantown team, "At Fenway" is a personal memoir about the experience of loving the Red Sox. Shaughnessy moves from an evocative introduction recalling a childhood of baseball mitts slung over bicycle handlebars to an in-depth cultural analysis of what he terms the Red Sox Nation--the people, places, and events that unite die-hard Sox fans across the country. It begins, of course, with an extended discussion of venerable Fenway Park, from its status as the best place to watch a ball game to what some contend is its negative impact on the team through the years. Shaughnessy also discusses fans, players, managers, team administrators, the local press, and the team's heroes and goats. All baseball fans worth their salt know a little about the Red Sox. With Shaughnessy's help, we'll know a lot more and be glad we do.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307554468
Publisher:
Crown/Archetype
Publication date:
06/09/2010
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
1,084,239
File size:
4 MB

Meet the Author

Dan Shaughnessy is a columnist for the Boston Globe and appears regularly on television and radio.  He is the author of five books, including The Curse of the Bambino and Seeing Red:  The Red Auerbach Story.  He lives in Newton, Massachusetts, with his wife, Marilou, and their children, Sarah, Kate, and Sam.


From the Hardcover edition.

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