At Grandpa's Sugar Bush

At Grandpa's Sugar Bush

by Margaret Carney, Janet Wilson
     
 

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Alongside his grandpa, a young boy shares the tasks involved in making maple syrup the old-fashioned way. From tapping the trees to boiling the sap, the two spend many hours working side by side in the woods. Their reward is a delicious breakfast of pancakes and ?the best syrup in the whole world.?

This is more than a story about syrup-making. It is the…  See more details below

Overview

Alongside his grandpa, a young boy shares the tasks involved in making maple syrup the old-fashioned way. From tapping the trees to boiling the sap, the two spend many hours working side by side in the woods. Their reward is a delicious breakfast of pancakes and ?the best syrup in the whole world.?

This is more than a story about syrup-making. It is the story of the grandfather's bond with nature and how he transfers this feeling to his grandson. Janet Wilson's rich oil paintings capture all the signs of spring's arrival in the sugar bush and the loving relationship between the boy and his grandpa.

Editorial Reviews

North Halton Compass
Even in the fairly monochromatic late winter bush, Janet has carefully introduced bursts of color to make her illustrations come alive. The gently told tale and realistic oils both combine to highlight the love, caring and tradition that are evident throughout this family’s winter work.
From the Publisher
Even in the fairly monochromatic late winter bush, Janet has carefully introduced bursts of color to make her illustrations come alive. The gently told tale and realistic oils both combine to highlight the love, caring and tradition that are evident throughout this family’s winter work.
Children's Literature - Susan Fournier
For many, the process of making maple syrup from sap is an annual springtime tradition. Such is the case for this little boy and his grandfather. Together they tap the trees and wait for each drop to fall in the bucket. While they wait, the boy and his grandfather look around the forest and trade observations of the first signs of spring. This is a special time for the boy and his grandfather. It takes many days and lots of hard work. Grandpa stirs long into the night to keep the syrup boiling without allowing it to burn. Finally the syrup is ready and is shared at breakfast on Grandma's pancakes. The vivid illustrations make the reader feel a part of the forest and the syrup making adventure. A great story for those who have never experienced making maple syrup, and a pleasant memory for those of us who have.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1In a clear, simple text, the author tells the story of a young boy and his grandfather enjoying their annual rite of making maple syrup on grandfather's farm in Canada. They drill the holes in the trees, gather the sap in buckets (no plastic tubing here), and cook it over an open fireplace. They enjoy tasting the sap, smelling its sweetness in the air as it cooks, and, finally, pouring the tasty syrup on grandma's pancakes. The realistic, brightly colored oil paintings glow with the beauty of the woods in early spring, and with the pleasure these two share in being together. The illustrations follow the process of making the syrup as it is described in the narrative, making it accessible to young children. This book is similar to Jessie Haas's Sugaring (Greenwillow, 1996). Together or separately, these books describe well a beloved family tradition in northern rural life.Virginia Golodetz, Children's Literature New England, Burlington, VT
Kirkus Reviews
Carney's debut is a paean to sugaring season, that yearly celebration of early spring in the north. A small boy joins his grandfather in the sugar bush to tap trees, gather sap, and boil it into sweet maple syrup. Along the way, the author makes note of wildlife and weather as well as the process of sugaring. Grandfather and grandson notice animal tracks, bird calls, the work of pileated woodpeckers, and snow fleas gathering in their footprints. The book is accurate and interesting, but it's also a visual delight. Wilson's painterly oils add details all their ownþa porcupine up a tree, a white-tailed deer in the distance, an exuberantly joyful dogþalong with informative close-ups of the sugaring apparatus, and a beautiful moonlit view of the sugar bush at night. Ever so appealing. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781550746716
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
756,346
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.12(d)
Lexile:
AD790L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Margaret Carney shares her deep love of nature through weekly newspaper columns as well as her books for children, which include At Grandpa's Sugar Bush and The Biggest Fish in the Lake. She wrote Where Does a Tiger-Heron Spend the Night? with the hope of turning young children into birders before they can read. She lives in Whitby, Ontario.

Janet Wilson is a prolific and award-winning children's book illustrator. Her books include Jasper's Day and The Biggest Fish in the Lake. She lives in Eden Mills, Ontario, with her husband, Chris.

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