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At Home on the Range
     

At Home on the Range

3.0 1
by Margaret Yardley Potter, Elizabeth Gilbert (Introduction)
 

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A cookbook far ahead of its time, Margaret Yardley Potter’s At Home on the Range, originally published in 1947, was rediscovered by the author Elizabeth Gilbert—who just so happens to be the author’s great-granddaughter. Gilbert’s “Gima” was no ordinary housewife: at a time when the American dinner table was hurtling

Overview


A cookbook far ahead of its time, Margaret Yardley Potter’s At Home on the Range, originally published in 1947, was rediscovered by the author Elizabeth Gilbert—who just so happens to be the author’s great-granddaughter. Gilbert’s “Gima” was no ordinary housewife: at a time when the American dinner table was hurtling towards homogeny, Potter espoused the importance of farmers’ markets and ethnic food (when pizza was considered ethnic), derided preservatives and culinary shortcuts, and lustily celebrated her epicurean adventures. Part scholar, part crusader, and always throwing parties, Potter could not but be a source of Gilbert’s own love of food, and her warm, infectious prose.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“She could have drunk and smoked Elizabeth David, M.F.K. Fisher and probably even Dorothy Parker under the table.” —The New York Times

“A cookbook for modern times and modern cooks, full of sassy jokes and smartly written recipes.” —Bon Appetit

“Delightfully humorous and remarkably insightful.” —Los Angeles Times

Christine Muhlke
…pure reading pleasure…Potter was a broad of the first order. Adventurous and funny, she could have drunk and smoked Elizabeth David, M. F. K. Fisher and probably even Dorothy Parker under the table.
—The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly
Author Elizabeth Gilbert (A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage) does a wonderful service by bringing back the opinionated, modern-for-its-time cookbook of her eccentric great-grandmother “Gima” Yardley Potter, first published in 1947. A woman who came from a wealthy Main Line Philadelphia family, married a profligate lawyer in the plentiful 1920s, and gradually had to come down in the world, Gima discarded the cook within the first three years of her marriage and energetically took charge of her own kitchen, learning from trial and error the art of entertaining myriad surprise guests her husband brought home and generally making-do while keeping everybody happy and well fed. Her upbeat tone that so impressed Gilbert when she finally read the cookbook braces the reader delightfully, from Gima’s merry use of calf’s brains and cockscombs (“with wine”) to relaying how to make what was then a rather curious, palate-wowing ethnic find called pizza. Chapters are devoted lovingly to what foods best to bring hospitalized friends, mastering cocktails, and organizing emergency meals and effortless entertaining. In her bright, determined tone (“Is your cigarette finished? Let’s go”), Yardley Potter assures us a generation before Julia Child that we can tackle bouillabaisse, preserves, bread, and grandmother’s sacred sponge cake. (May)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781938073687
Publisher:
McSweeney's Publishing
Publication date:
05/14/2013
Edition description:
First Trade Paper Edition
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.80(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author


Margaret Yardley Potter's book is culled from a lifetime of cooking and entertaining in her home, from the 1920s through World War II. In addition to being a cooking columnist for the Wilmington Star, she also painted, sold dresses, assisted in the birth of four grandchildren, and took up swing piano.

Elizabeth Gilbert is the best-selling author of numerous books, including Eat, Pray, Love, now a major motion picture. In 2008, Time magazine named Elizabeth as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

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At Home on the Range 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a treasure! How many times do we miss the dishes that were our favorites during our youth? The hands that prepared them are gone and too often they never wrote down the "secret formulas" that made them so wonderful. Thank goodness that Elizabeth Gilbert's family has a genetic gift for recording the truly meaningful adventures in their lives! A good lesson for all of us.
Cinderella82 More than 1 year ago
Very interesting reading re. cooking in the "old days."