At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky

Overview

Tell me, pleads the speaker in the opening lines of "Poem for Virginia in Ecstasy." Tell me all about it. That consuming curiosity is emblematic of this anticipated debut collection, which investigates, interrogates, and animates its subjects with a strong mix of empathy and imagination. Whether depicting The Wild Boy of Aveyron’s introduction to high society (a failed formal dinner arranged by his doctor), Nijinsky's autopsy (his feet are opened in search of a mechanism that would explain his genius), or the ...
See more details below
Paperback
$14.53
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$15.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $5.83   
  • New (6) from $9.91   
  • Used (3) from $5.83   
Sending request ...

Overview

Tell me, pleads the speaker in the opening lines of "Poem for Virginia in Ecstasy." Tell me all about it. That consuming curiosity is emblematic of this anticipated debut collection, which investigates, interrogates, and animates its subjects with a strong mix of empathy and imagination. Whether depicting The Wild Boy of Aveyron’s introduction to high society (a failed formal dinner arranged by his doctor), Nijinsky's autopsy (his feet are opened in search of a mechanism that would explain his genius), or the actress Sean Young's turn as Isadora Duncan in a Russian ballet (she is adored), these poems want to know more, to see beneath the costume to the essence of the individual. A measured polemic against quantifiable knowledge and scientific truth, At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky celebrates its subjects' differences—which is to say their genius—by laying them bare.
Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

Herbert Leibowitz
Contemplative and intimate, Bridget Lowe’s At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky is an uncommonly mature debut. Her poems conduct a forensic inquiry into ways to heal the rifts between mind and body, the traumatic wars between our animal and spiritual selves. With an artful integration of feeling and technique, she interweaves evidence drawn from her own experience and the lives of figures like The Wild Boy of Aveyron, a pilgrim, a forgotten actress, Nijinsky. These thwarted souls, reminiscent of Chekhovian characters mystified by their own erratic behavior and disappointments, are memorably etched. In her poems, Lowe interprets the tragic conundrums of life with empathy and analytic clarity. At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky is a waking dream filled with somber, beautiful images, and echoes, resonances, and leitmotifs that create a plaintive music the reader will return to again and again.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780887485633
  • Publisher: Carnegie-Mellon University Press
  • Publication date: 2/12/2013
  • Series: Carnegie Mellon Poetry Series
  • Pages: 64
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

BRIDGET LOWE’s poems have appeared in The New Republic, American Poetry Review, Denver Quarterly, Parnassus, Best American Poetry, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. She is a graduate of Beloit College and earned her MFA in poetry at Syracuse University. Her honors include a "Discovery"/Boston Review Prize and the 2011 Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellowship to The MacDowell Colony. This is her first book.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Poem for Virginia as Joan of Arc
Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier and Wife, Posing with Scientific Instruments Just Before He Is Beheaded
In My Study of Hysteria
The Wild Boy of Aveyron Stands Up During a Dinner Arranged by the Doctor
The Forgotten Actress as Contestant on Dancing with the Stars
The Forgotten Actress as Isadora Duncan in Russia
Pygmalion
Animal Facing Left, a Sketch of the Wild Boy of Aveyron
The Pilgrim Is Bridled and Bespectacled
At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky
Portrait of Young Suburban Male as the Wild Boy of Aveyron
State Line
Saint John in the Wilderness
Leitmotif
Vaslav Nijinsky in 1919
Anti-Pastoral
The Forgotten Actress Heckles an Important Man at an Awards Dinner in L.A.
First Key Moments in the Construction of the Master Narrative
The Gods Rush In Like Police
The Pilgrim Looks at the World from Above
The Nihilist Takes a Bow
The Doctor, Drunk, Gives the Wild Boy of Aveyron Advice on Women and Sex
Saint John in the Wilderness, ii
Whatever You Thought Your Body to Be
God Is a Mathematician and in My Dreams
Proof
Heaven
Eat Not the Heart, Neither the Brain
Achilles and Penthesilea
You Come Back to Me as This Feeling from Childhood
The Pilgrim on the Shore
Poem for Virginia in Ecstasy
Blue and Red Ink Picture by Nijinsky in the Asylum
Prayer
The Forgotten Actress Dressed as Catwoman Alone in Her Room
A Washerwoman’s Account, Aveyron, 1799
Her Plea: Immortality as It Was Promised Her
I Am a Receptionist Who Is Not Afraid of Death
Folk Song from the Region of Aveyron
How the Pilgrim was Transformed
Notes
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)