At the End of Life: True Stories About How We Die

At the End of Life: True Stories About How We Die

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by Lee Gutkind
     
 

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What should medicine do when it can’t save your life?

The modern healthcare system has become proficient at staving off death with aggressive interventions. And yet, eventually everyone dies—and although most Americans say they would prefer to die peacefully at home, more than half of all deaths take place in hospitals or health care facilities.

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Overview


What should medicine do when it can’t save your life?

The modern healthcare system has become proficient at staving off death with aggressive interventions. And yet, eventually everyone dies—and although most Americans say they would prefer to die peacefully at home, more than half of all deaths take place in hospitals or health care facilities.

At the End of Life—the latest collaborative book project between the Creative Nonfiction Foundation and the Jewish Healthcare Foundation—tackles this conundrum head on. Featuring twenty-two compelling personal-medical narratives, the collection explores death, dying and palliative care, and highlights current features, flaws and advances in the healthcare system.

Here, a poet and former hospice worker reflects on death’s mysteries; a son wanders the halls of his mother’s nursing home, lost in the small absurdities of the place; a grief counselor struggles with losing his own grandfather; a medical intern traces the origins and meaning of time; a mother anguishes over her decision to turn off her daughter’s life support and allow her organs to be harvested; and a nurse remembers many of her former patients.

These original, compelling personal narratives reveal the inner workings of hospitals, homes and hospices where patients, their doctors and their loved ones all battle to hang on—and to let go.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In 22 essays, family members who have survived the death of children and parents, as well as a variety of health professionals, talk frankly about their experiences with the dying and the process of death, raising important questions about how much should be done to prolong life, what to tell the dying, and how to handle our grief. For Beecher Grogan, the most selfless gesture in life as a mother is giving her 12-year-old, tormented by leukemia, her blessing to die in peace. And Phyllis Galley Westover, a former college dean, put her life on hold to care for her depressed and feeble 101-year-old father, but she wondered if she had done right by him or herself when she saved him from drowning when he fell into the swimming pool. Caroline Burau, a 911 dispatcher, doesn’t fulfill her fantasy of “ everything right,... anticipat every need” when she takes a harrowing call from a woman whose six-year-old had just shot her four-year-old. Creative Nonfiction magazine editor Gutkind gathers an impressive, meaningful, and often courageous chorus of voices tackling a once-taboo subject with dignity, giving strength and consolation particularly to those enduring the deaths of loved ones. Agent: Andrew Blauner, Blauner Books Literary Agency. (Apr.)
From the Publisher

"This is an encouraging collection—not only in a very literal sense but also in the help it offers us in thinking about death, how clear it makes our lack of control over death (and so over life). The book is crammed with stories of parents, children, long-time patients, emergency cases, complete strangers. The dying are young, old, middle-aged, and, variously, brave, grumpy, accepting, difficult, defiant. The family and friends, doctors, nurses, EMTs, and chaplains who accompany them have a lot to say about what they’ve observed and learned and resolved to change. This is a valuable contribution to our store of works in the Medical Humanities that will likely cause both medical students and doctors to ponder new ways of dealing with their dying patients.” — Kathryn Montgomery, author of Doctors’ Stories and How Doctors Think

"A gripping and passionate account of how we face the final rite of passage. These stories mine the agility of the human spirit, and will not easily be forgotten." — Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, author of Medicine in Translation and Singular Intimacies

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781937163044
Publisher:
Fourth Chapter Books
Publication date:
04/10/2012
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
527,123
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"This is an encouraging collection—not only in a very literal sense but also in the help it offers us in thinking about death, how clear it makes our lack of control over death (and so over life). The book is crammed with stories of parents, children, long-time patients, emergency cases, complete strangers. The dying are young, old, middle-aged, and, variously, brave, grumpy, accepting, difficult, defiant. The family and friends, doctors, nurses, EMTs, and chaplains who accompany them have a lot to say about what they’ve observed and learned and resolved to change. This is a valuable contribution to our store of works in the Medical Humanities that will likely cause both medical students and doctors to ponder new ways of dealing with their dying patients.” — Kathryn Montgomery, author of Doctors’ Stories and How Doctors Think

"A gripping and passionate account of how we face the final rite of passage. These stories mine the agility of the human spirit, and will not easily be forgotten." — Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, author of Medicine in Translation and Singular Intimacies

Read More

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