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At the End of Ridge Road (The Credo Series)
     

At the End of Ridge Road (The Credo Series)

by Joseph Bruchac
 

In the 1960s in graduate school, Joseph Bruchac studied with Grace Paley and met Allen Ginsberg. He went on to earn his PhD and work in Africa, an experience that confirmed his belief that native peoples all over the world possess hard-won knowledge—of humanity's capacity for self-destruction—wisdom set down in their stories and traditions. Now in his

Overview


In the 1960s in graduate school, Joseph Bruchac studied with Grace Paley and met Allen Ginsberg. He went on to earn his PhD and work in Africa, an experience that confirmed his belief that native peoples all over the world possess hard-won knowledge—of humanity's capacity for self-destruction—wisdom set down in their stories and traditions. Now in his sixties, Bruchac is known for keeping these stories alive, through traditional Native American storytelling, original children’s books, fiction, and poetry. Books in his "Keepers of the Earth" series, co-authored with Michael Caduto, have sold millions of copies.

At the End of Ridge Road, a philosophical memoir, brings together the threads of Bruchac's life and reveals the linkage between his interest in native cultures—he is Abenaki—and his views about human dignity and social justice. He begins by asking readers to "take off your watch" and "live time" rather than being ruled by it. He then tells about his childhood in the Adirondacks, the Abenaki heritage of the region, his path from "nature nut" to jock to writer, and his house on Ridge Road. Through these stories, property, and "the circle as a way of seeing."

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
In the first chapter of this memoir, Bruchac invites readers to take off their watches and free themselves of the restraints of time-at least for a while. What follows is a non-linear telling of how he came to live a short walk away from where his Abenaki grandfather was born. Along the meandering way, Bruchac discusses his transformation from nerd to jock to poet to publisher. He also briefly touches on his marriage, their relief work in Africa, and how he reclaimed the Native American heritage his family tried to ignore. Bruchac's book is part of the Credo series, which seeks to "explore the essential goals, concerns, and practices of contemporary American writers whose work emphasizes the natural world and human community." The circular narrative style is initially confusing but essential to Bruchac's themes of perseverance and interconnection. The memoir covers a lot of ground in scant pages at the cost of depth, and skims over many complex topics that deserve more attention. Series editor Scott Slovic's essay Native American Literature, Contemporary Environmental Scholarship and Activism, and the Work of Joseph Bruchac, will be of possible interest for curriculum development. The selected bibliography helpfully divides Bruchac's prolific output into genres. Bruchac's Bowman's Store (Dial, 1997/VOYA February 1998) provides a more complete self-portrait while addressing many of the same themes. It is an additional purchase for author studies collections. VOYA CODES: 3Q 2P S (Readable without serious defects; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2005, Milkweed Editions, 143p.; Biblio. Source Notes., $14 Trade pb. Ages 15 to 18.
—Tracy Piombo

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781571312754
Publisher:
Milkweed Editions
Publication date:
11/15/2004
Series:
The Credo Series
Pages:
143
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

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