At the Highest Levels: The Inside Story of the End of the Cold War

At the Highest Levels: The Inside Story of the End of the Cold War

by Michael Beschloss, Strobe Talbott
     
 

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Reveals a hitherto secret dimension of the most momentous event of our time: the end of the Cold War. Shows us the vital transactions that George Bush & Mikhail Gorbachev made & concealed from the world: Bushs pledge not to press Gorbachev for Baltic independence, the manipulations for German unification, how Russia joined the Gulf War coalition, Bushs

Overview

Reveals a hitherto secret dimension of the most momentous event of our time: the end of the Cold War. Shows us the vital transactions that George Bush & Mikhail Gorbachev made & concealed from the world: Bushs pledge not to press Gorbachev for Baltic independence, the manipulations for German unification, how Russia joined the Gulf War coalition, Bushs private warnings to Gorbachev that he was about to be overthrown, & the U.S. Presidents secret efforts to prevent the breakup of the Russia & keep Gorbachev in power. An insiders account of the greatest events since the end of WW II.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In attempting to establish the social, physiological, cultural and psychological grounds for understanding food and its relationship to the brain, Bourre may have tackled a subject too complex in scope to be covered sufficiently in one volume. Topics such as alcoholism, herbology, vitamin deficiencies and eating disorders are certainly of interest when discussed individually, yet when combined with more complicated interpretations of dietetics and biology, in addition to myriad quotes ranging from those of philosophers to poets, scientists, and chefs, the result is a sometimes confusing array of data and research, gastronomic trivia and psychology. Still, the criticism of ``fashionable dietetics'' is provocative, and there is useful nutritional information, as well as brief histories of food. Bourre, a specialist in brain research, is right to say that too little is known of the mechanics of the brain and much is misunderstood; there is certainly a lot of room for exploration in the field. Unfortunately, however, the book does not explain our most mysterious organ cohesively or conclusively. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Bourre, research director at Paris's Institut National de la Recherche Medicale, argues that cuisine and gastronomy are vital to human nutrition. His book, whose title is somewhat misleading, surveys the basics of dietary biochemistry from protein through the various trace elements and briefly describes the brain and the senses. Despite much useful and detailed information, the author makes some unsubstantiated and contradictory statements (e.g., he claims that the best way to build muscle is to eat meat, while noting that evolving herbivores put on so much muscle as to become moribund). Such comments will certainly provoke controversy, and that alone may generate reader interest. Except where demand warrants, however, this is a questionable purchase.-- Laurie Bartolini, Lincoln Lib., Springfield, Ill.
Booknews
From early in 1989, the authors were privy to classified US and Soviet documents, cables, telephone transcripts, and diplomatic records, on the condition that they not publish the information before the end of 1992. They chronicle the intense and personal interaction between Gorbachev and Bush, who were, as stated in the preface, "...so attuned to each other that it eventually caused both men to lose touch with their domestic constituencies." Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316092821
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
03/28/1994
Edition description:
1st Paperback Edition
Pages:
521
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.23(h) x 1.34(d)

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