Atelier Adamson

Atelier Adamson

by David Adamson, William Christenberry, Chuck Close
     
 

Based in Washington, D.C., Atelier Adamson is considered by many to be the world's highest-quality digital printmaker, and given the studio's collaboration with some of the best-known and most influential artists of our time, that's a hard claim to dispute. Adamson Editions has grown since 1979 from the passion of one man, David Adamson, and his lithography studio…  See more details below

Overview

Based in Washington, D.C., Atelier Adamson is considered by many to be the world's highest-quality digital printmaker, and given the studio's collaboration with some of the best-known and most influential artists of our time, that's a hard claim to dispute. Adamson Editions has grown since 1979 from the passion of one man, David Adamson, and his lithography studio into a major force in the contemporary art scene. In addition, Adamson Gallery is dedicated to showing the talents of outstanding international artists as well as showcasing collaborative work from Adamson Editions digital atelier. This book accompanies an exhibition at the Maison Europeane de la Photographie and presents some of the finest work of recent years by the studio and its artists, including selections of the work of Chuck Close, William Christenberry, François-Marie Banier, Jim Dine, Adam Fuss, Jenny Holzer, Roni Horn, Robert Longo, Robert Rauschenberg, Jack Pierson, Victor Schrager, Donald Sultan and William Wegman.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783865211507
Publisher:
Steidl/MEP, Paris
Publication date:
10/30/2008
Edition description:
Bilingual Edition
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
9.80(w) x 13.20(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

Born in 1936 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, William Christenberry is recognized as an artist, photographer, teacher and arts advocate. Greatly influenced by Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, Walker Evans and James Agee's 1936 masterpiece on life in the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression, Christenberry has spent the last 30 years making pictures in and around Hale County, Alabama, documenting rural southern landscapes and the worn, remote margins of small-town life. He has lived and worked in Washington, D.C., since 1968, where he is a professor at the Corcoran College of Art + Design. His work can be found in the collections of, among others, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and The Museum of Modern Art.

Chuck Close was born in Monroe, Washington, in 1940 and studied visual art at Yale University. Photography has been an integral part of his painting process since the mid-60s, and later became a body of work in its own right. Close has also distinguished himself as a master of printmaking. Since 1967 his work has been the subject of more than 100 major exhibitions throughout the world.

Jim Dine was born in Cincinnati in 1935 and made his entrance into the New York art world in the late 1950s. His paintings, drawings, photographs and sculpture have since been shown at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Guggenheim Museum, New York. Dine has taught art at Yale, Oberlin and Cornell.

Jenny Holzer was born in 1950 in Gallipolis, Ohio. She first came to prominence in New York in the late 70s and early 80s. Among other awards she has received, Holzer in 1990became the first woman to ever win the Leone d'Oro at the Venice Biennale. Her work has been exhibited in most every major museum around the world, and she has created installations for public and private sites including the Reichstag and the Times Square Spectacolor billboard in New York.

Roni Horn was born in 1955 in New York, where she continues to live and work. Since earning her MFA from Yale University in 1978, she has shown her sculptures, installations and photographs extensively throughout the world. She has had solo exhibitions at the Dia Center for the Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Her recent publications include Dictionary of Water, Cabinet of, Wonderwater (Alice Offshore), and Index Cixous (Cix Pax).

Robert Longo was born in 1953 in Brooklyn. His large-scale drawings of photo-realistic scenes, for which he is best known, have been exhibited internationally, most recently in solo exhibitions at the Jewish Museum in Berlin, Metro Pictures in New York and the Albertina in Vienna.

Robert Rauschenberg was born in Port Arthur, Texas, in 1925. After studying in Paris on the G.I. Bill in his twenties, he returned to the U.S., pausing only to investigate the Black Mountain College art scene before taking on—and swiftly conquering—New York. He had his first solo show at Leo Castelli Gallery in his early thirties, and quickly went on to become one of the most important artists of the twentieth century. Rauschenberg is represented in every major museum collection, and many retrospective exhibitions of his work have toured the globe—including a thematic one at the Guggenheim Museum in 1997. In 1970, he moved to Captiva Island, off the Gulf Coast of Florida, where he still lives and works.

Andy Grundberg is an art critic, teacher, curator and consultant who has been a proponent of photography's role in the fine arts for more than 25 years. He has been a critic and columnist at the New York Times, served as Director of the Ansel Adams Center for Photography, and is founder and Editor-in-Chief of the visual-culture journal see, and the author of many books on photography.

Adam Fuss was born in London in 1961. His father, a Polish Jew who had emigrated from Vienna before WWII, was a manufacturer of high-quality womenis coats, while his mother, a model, came from a large Australian family. Fuss' childhood was spent back-and-forth between England and Australia, his family's situation subject to the poor health of his father, who died in 1968. Later on, after his schooling ended, Fuss traveled to Alaska on a small inheritance. Returning to Australia in 1980, he apprenticed in the darkroom of the Ogilvy & Mathers advertising agency, but left that post for New York just two years later. Paying his way as a waiter and later in the imaging rooms of an auction house, he took up a pinhole camera and later began making photograms. Since the mid-90s, his work has been included in some of the world's most important collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, in New York, where Fuss continues to live and work.

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