The Atheist's Fatal Flaw: Exposing Conflicting Beliefs [NOOK Book]

Overview

Most critiques of atheism focus on refuting head-on the claims of atheists. Instead, this unique book faithfully represents what atheists say they believe and stands back to watch as the natural inconsistencies in that worldview inevitably rise to the surface.

Norman L. Geisler, the apologetic giant of our time, is joined by Daniel J. McCoy, highlighting two inconsistencies in particular. First they examine the atheist's assertion that God ...
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The Atheist's Fatal Flaw: Exposing Conflicting Beliefs

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Overview

Most critiques of atheism focus on refuting head-on the claims of atheists. Instead, this unique book faithfully represents what atheists say they believe and stands back to watch as the natural inconsistencies in that worldview inevitably rise to the surface.

Norman L. Geisler, the apologetic giant of our time, is joined by Daniel J. McCoy, highlighting two inconsistencies in particular. First they examine the atheist's assertion that God cannot exist because there is evil in the world and that if God truly existed, he would intervene. These same people then turn around and say any intervention on God's part would impose upon human autonomy, and thus would be unjust. Second, these very interventions that would be considered immoral if imposed upon the earth by God are lauded when they stem instead from some human institution or authority.

Geisler and McCoy highlight this kind of "doublethink" step by step, showing readers how to identify such inconsistencies in atheistic arguments and refute them--or rather show atheists how they refute themselves.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781441245915
  • Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/10/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 725,480
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Norman L. Geisler (PhD, Loyola University of Chicago) is Distinguished Professor of Apologetics and Theology at Veritas Evangelical Seminary in Murrieta, California. He is the author of more than eighty books, including When Skeptics Ask and The Big Book of Christian Apologetics.

Daniel J. McCoy (MA, Veritas Evangelical Seminary) is an associate minister and Christian school teacher, and is currently working toward a PhD through North-West University.
Norman L. Geisler (PhD, Loyola University of Chicago) has taught at top evangelical colleges and seminaries for over fifty years and is distinguished professor of apologetics and theology at Veritas Evangelical Seminary in Murrieta, California. He is the author of nearly eighty books, including the Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics, Christian Ethics, and Systematic Theology. He and his wife live in North Carolina. Learn more at www.normangeisler.com.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 23, 2014

    Highly Recommended.

    Highly recommended. For atheists. Before it's too late. Read it now. Not later. But now.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 4, 2014

    In their apologetics book "The Atheist's Fatal Flaw",

    In their apologetics book "The Atheist's Fatal Flaw", authors Norman Geisler and Daniel McCoy seek to peel back the back-and-forth arguments that often characterize Christian apologetics against atheist claims. Instead, they endeavor to examine one of the atheist's charges against God: the problem of moral evil and suffering in the world. Those who don't believe in God claim that if God were all-good and all-loving, then He would be able to prevent suffering, and in fact intervene to prevent evil from ever arising in the first place. Despite this, atheists protest that God would be immoral to intervene in the affairs of men. It is this inconsistency that the authors seek to reveal.




    A great deal of the book consists of atheist quotes illustrating and expounding on their positions--at least about two-thirds of the book. It isn't until the last three chapters the authors reach their main point. Personally, I found the amount of atheist quotes contained to be somewhat overwhelming. While they serve to make it clear just atheists believe, I have to wonder if at some point the authors reached a point where they were flogging a dead horse to explain some of the chapters.




    Overall, while a bit technical and lengthy, this is a still good book for Christians searching to learn more about atheism and how it is a logically inconsistent worldview.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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