The Athenian Constitution

The Athenian Constitution

3.9 211
by Aristotle
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Ancient accounts of Aristotle credit him with 170 Constitutions of various states; it is widely assumed that these were research for the Politics, and that many of them were written or drafted by his students. Athens, however, was a particularly important state, and where Aristotle was living at the time; it is plausible that, even if students did the others,…  See more details below

Overview

Ancient accounts of Aristotle credit him with 170 Constitutions of various states; it is widely assumed that these were research for the Politics, and that many of them were written or drafted by his students. Athens, however, was a particularly important state, and where Aristotle was living at the time; it is plausible that, even if students did the others, Aristotle did that one himself, and possible that it was intended as a model for the rest. However, a number of prominent scholars doubt that it was written by Aristotle. If it is a genuine writing of Aristotle, then it is of particular significance because it is the only one of his extant writings that was actually intended for publication. Because it purports to supply us with so much contemporary information previously unknown or unreliable, modern historians have claimed that "the discovery of this treatise constitutes almost a new epoch in Greek historical study."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781625583352
Publisher:
Start Publishing LLC
Publication date:
01/03/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
52
File size:
263 KB

Meet the Author

Aristotle was born in Macedonia in 384 bc. For twenty years he studied at Athens in the academy of Plato, before becoming tutor of the young Alexander the Great. When Alexander became king of Macedonia in 336, Aristotle returned to Athens and founded his own school and research institute, the Lyceum. Aristotle fled to Calcis in 323 in the aftermath of Alexander's death, where he died a year later.

P. J. Rhodes is Professor of Ancient History at Durham University, and is a Fellow of the British Academy. His major work is Commentary on the Aristotelian Athenation Politeia.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >