Atlas of Ambulatory EEG

Atlas of Ambulatory EEG

by Steven C. Schachter
     
 
Atlas of Ambulatory EEG is a first-of-its-kind publication in clinical neurophysiology, an atlas that comprehensively depicts normal, abnormal, and artifactual findings from actual ambulatory EEG recordings in a convenient and easily accessible format. As the use of ambulatory EEG has increased in recent years, the need for a concise atlas of ambulatory EEG has

Overview

Atlas of Ambulatory EEG is a first-of-its-kind publication in clinical neurophysiology, an atlas that comprehensively depicts normal, abnormal, and artifactual findings from actual ambulatory EEG recordings in a convenient and easily accessible format. As the use of ambulatory EEG has increased in recent years, the need for a concise atlas of ambulatory EEG has grown significantly, since ambulatory EEG tracings are subject to their own unique issues and artifacts, often not discussed in standard EEG atlases. This book begins with several chapters that introduce the history, technology, and clinical utility of ambulatory EEG. The bulk of the atlas consists of a page-by-page display of high-quality ambulatory EEG excerpts that are easy to review and come with short annotations describing the relevant findings. Atlas of Ambulatory EEG is a critical resource for anyone involved in the interpretation of ambulatory EEG studies.

A handy reference describing EEG patterns in normal and abnormal subjects based upon continuous monitoring techniques from widely used ambulatory EEG equipment.

A section of EEG patterns without accompanying explanation will test the reader's ability to interpret the waveforms and answers will be given in a separate section.

Unique accompanying CD, which provides a sample of EEG files. The files have been provided by Digitrace - a company which maintains a vast library of EEG files.

Internationally renowned contributors in the field.

Wide audience including researchers in neurophysiology and neuroscience, as well as neurologists.

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Jennifer L Hopp, MD (University of Maryland School of Medicine)
Description: This is the first edition of an ambulatory atlas of EEG. This is also a first-of-its-kind atlas of ambulatory EEG recordings and it includes a review and basics of ambulatory EEG, history and clinical use of the method of recording, in addition to the atlas portion with examples of EEG.
Purpose: The editors state that the purpose is to provide an atlas of ambulatory EEG recordings that could serve as a reference. Although EEG reading is not particularly different in ambulatory and non-ambulatory recordings, it is known that there can be some differences in the appearance of the tracings, as well as artifacts that may be encountered that are not seen often in routine EEG. Although the text portion of the atlas, including a review of the history of ambulatory EEG and clinical use, is informative, it is not clear that there is a great need for a separate of atlas of this type. Certainly, as no other similar book exists, this atlas does fill a small niche in the field. The book does meet the authors' objectives in general, though specific examples of the EEGs in the atlas that are clearly unique in terms of ambulatory recording would support the claim that there is a strong need for this atlas.
Audience: The atlas is targeted at a wide range of neurologists and neurophysiologists at all levels of training, according to the editors. It appears that the simplicity of the text as well as the EEG examples used meet this goal. The senior editors and contributors are credible authorities, and it appears that the third editor is a colleague at the same institution.
Features: The first half of the book includes a comprehensive review by various authors of the history and utility of ambulatory EEG. The algorithms for spike and seizure detection are also reviewed. The second half is an atlas organized in a standard fashion with regard to technical aspects of recording EEG, artifacts, and abnormal findings. The book is helpful in that it covers topics of ambulatory recording that are relatively new in the field of neurophysiology. However, while the goal is to include examples of EEG that might be unique to ambulatory recording, the section on artifacts in particular, but also normal and abnormal EEG findings, are not unlike that which would be seen in other types of EEG recordings and atlases that currently exist.
Assessment: While I think the text is well written and the EEG examples are clear, and certainly this type of atlas is the first in the field, I'm not clear that there was a significant need for this atlas as a neurophysiology reference. The EEGs in the second half of the atlas are good examples of ambulatory EEG recording, but they are not clearly unique as compared to others already published, other than the mode in which they were acquired, that is, by ambulatory recording.
3 Stars from Doody

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780126213454
Publisher:
Elsevier Science
Publication date:
04/01/2005
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.40(d)

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