Atlas of Crime: Mapping the Criminal Landscape

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$110.95
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 98%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $59.50   
  • Used (6) from $1.99   

Overview

With topics ranging from armed robbery in L.A. to murder in Miami, this atlas provides a unique collection of maps and essays, presenting a comprehensive and multi-faceted picture of crime in the United States. Blending current trends with history, Atlas of Crime stands out for its coverage of critical topics such as school violence, hate crimes, domestic terrorism, rape, capital punishment, and more. This outstanding resource includes approximately 170 graphics (maps, charts, and tables), and at least 30 original essays from 32 contributors.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The authors, all associated with Georgia State University, explore the geographical aspects of crime, showing how space affects the decisions made by criminals. They consider, for example, what regions have the highest murder rates, where drug dealers get their drugs, and what cities and states have the highest incidents and largest varieties of crimes. They also create crime maps that provide a very clear visual of crime location and the level of incident. Heavily influenced by the Chicago School and its ecological approach (e.g., concentric-zones theory, sectoral theory, and multiple-nuclei theory), the geographic approach to studying crime is not new. Still, mapping is an excellent way of studying crime, making this study extremely beneficial for sociologists and criminologists. Highly recommended for collections in these areas.--Tim Delaney, Canisius Coll., Buffalo, NY Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Contributors in geography, the social and natural sciences, and criminal justice, many from Georgia and surrounding states, but a couple from Liverpool, explore and explain how modern mapping techniques and software are used to reveal important and useful patterns in the location and distribution of crime. Their general themes are the geographic history of crime, crimes of personal violence, crimes against property, family violence, organized and entrepreneurial crimes, Film at 11 crimes, mental mapping, and criminal justice. They include many black-and-white maps as examples. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781573562416
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/11/2000
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author

LINDA S. TURNBULL is completing her Ph.D. in sociology at Georgia State University with a specialization in criminal and deviant behavior.

ELAINE HALLISEY HENDRIX is the geographic information systems research coordinator in the Department of Anthropology and Geography at Georgia State University.

BORDEN D. DENT is professor emeritus of geography in the Department of Anthropology and Geography at Georgia State University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables
Contributors
Preface
Acknowledgments
Cartography in the Atlas of Crime
Ch. 1 Geographic History of Crime 1
Brief History of Crime Mapping 4
Ch. 2 Crimes of Personal Violence 22
Homicide 24
Assault 30
Rape in the United States 37
Robbery 43
Ch. 3 Crimes Against Property 51
Burglary 53
Auto Theft and Detecting Chop Shop Locations 60
Environmental Crime 68
Confronting Computer Crimes 82
Ch. 4 Family Violence 89
Intimate Violence 91
The Spatial Dimensions of Child Abuse and Neglect 100
Elder Abuse 108
Animal Cruelty: A Spatial Investigation 113
Ch. 5 Organized and Entrepreneurial Crimes 122
Mapping the Set Space of Urban Street Gangs 125
The Spatial Dynamics of Drug Trafficking 132
Prostitution 140
Modern Maritime Piracy 149
Ch. 6 "Film at 11" Crimes 153
Serial Murder in the United States, 1860-1995 155
Domestic Terrorism 162
Hate Crimes 171
School Violence 179
Ch. 7 Mental Mapping 184
Criminals' Mental Maps 186
Cognitive Maps and the Fear of Crime 192
Maps in Detective Fiction 199
Ch. 8 Criminal Justice 208
A Spatial Analysis of American Police Killed in the Line of Duty 212
The Concept of Community Policing and a Case Study of Lima, Ohio 221
Crime Scene Sketch 229
Police Department Use of Geographic Information Systems for Crime Analysis 236
Capital Punishment 248
Index 259
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)