Atlas of Early Michigan: An Interpretation of the 1816-1856 General Land Office Surveys

Overview

This easy-to-use Atlas provides the historical notes and maps of Michigan created by surveyors from the federal General Land Office (GLO) between 1816 and 1856. In addition, present-day maps have been overlain on the historic maps so that readers can locate the original forest and grassland types within Michigan today. This book affords readers the opportunity to see how areas throughout the state appeared to surveyors more than 150 years ago.
     Between ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (4) from $22.95   
  • New (2) from $29.59   
  • Used (2) from $22.95   
Sending request ...

Overview

This easy-to-use Atlas provides the historical notes and maps of Michigan created by surveyors from the federal General Land Office (GLO) between 1816 and 1856. In addition, present-day maps have been overlain on the historic maps so that readers can locate the original forest and grassland types within Michigan today. This book affords readers the opportunity to see how areas throughout the state appeared to surveyors more than 150 years ago.
     Between 1988 and 1995, a team of ecologists assembled the original GLO maps and overlaid topographic, county, and statewide information onto them. They also mapped the boundaries of distinct forest types, modern topography and soils information, and the interpretations of expert field ecologists. Each forest, wetland, or prairie type shown on the GLO maps is accompanied by a photograph, a brief description, and a statewide map showing the distribution of each land type.
 

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780870138317
  • Publisher: Michigan State University Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2008
  • Pages: 136
  • Sales rank: 1,008,519
  • Product dimensions: 10.80 (w) x 15.50 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Dennis A. Albert is active in Great Lakes wetland research and developing wetland assessment protocols with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Patrick J. Comer is an ecologist and was the project coordinator for the 1988-1995 interpretation and mapping efforts that resulted in the book Atlas of Early Michigan's Forests, Grasslands, and Wetlands.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 21, 2011

    Great Surveyor gift idea

    Bought this as a gift for my father-in-law who is a surveyor in Michigan. The book is great!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 1, 2009

    charting Michigan's 19th-century environment before settlement

    "A major purpose of this atlas is to provide current Michigan residents with a sense of place--as sense of the landscape in which they now live. Since this "landscape...is increasingly isolated from its ecological history," this sense of place related to its appearance is waning. The authors help to make up for this, however, by citing surviving areas in Michigan where residents can go to see what the landscape of their locale looked like before it was depleted by development.

    These areas of surviving landscape are cited in a section coming before the maps. One would read the map having the place where one lived--or any other place in Michigan one was curious about; find what the landscape was like using the legend on the front or back gatefold (i. e., jacket flap; and then look at the pictures and read the descriptive text in the section. The legend having thirty different colors recognizes as many types of landscape or mixed types within the broader headings of water or wetlands and under uplands, open, woodland or savanna, and forest. Landscapes damaged by fire, beaver flooding, or windthrow are also recognized.

    The 103 maps of parts of Michigan are modern-day maps with major highways, many secondary roads, cities and towns noted. The "early Michigan" landscape superimposed on these, so to speak, is from General Land Offices surveys done between 1816 and 1856 by the U.S. government in anticipation of land sales and settlement. Full-page in this folio-size atlas, the maps are quite detailed. They could be use to travel throughout Michigan though their purpose is representation of the early Michigan landscape (meaning types of vegetation for the most part).

    Secondary uses for the atlas, in the hope of the authors, are as a "tool for conservationists" and aid to historians in answering questions about settlement patterns. Regarding this latter interest for example, the General Land Office surveys likely account for the slow growth of the city if Detroit to the south. For they describe this land "as a broad and uninviting patchwork of swamps and wet prairies." What roads there were were impassable for parts of the year, and mosquitoes were rife in the swamplands.

    This well-done, smartly and economically organized, atlas is a model for ones that should be done for any state where 19th-century or any early-date surveys of landscape and vegetation are available. It is useful and interesting in a range of ways; and it documents much historical environment material from different sources.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)