Atlas of the Great Irish Famine

Overview

The Great Irish Famine is the most pivotal event in modern Irish history, with implications that cannot be underestimated. Over a million people perished between 1845-1852, and well over a million others fled to other locales within Europe and America. By 1850, the Irish made up a quarter of the population in Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. The 2000 US census had 41 million people claim Irish ancestry, or one in five white Americans. Atlas of the Great Irish Famine (1845-52) considers how such...

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Overview

The Great Irish Famine is the most pivotal event in modern Irish history, with implications that cannot be underestimated. Over a million people perished between 1845-1852, and well over a million others fled to other locales within Europe and America. By 1850, the Irish made up a quarter of the population in Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. The 2000 US census had 41 million people claim Irish ancestry, or one in five white Americans. Atlas of the Great Irish Famine (1845-52) considers how such a near total decimation of a country by natural causes could take place in industrialized, 19th century Europe and situates the Great Famine alongside other world famines for a more globally informed approach.

The Atlas seeks to try and bear witness to the thousands and thousands of people who died and are buried in mass Famine pits or in fields and ditches, with little or nothing to remind us of their going. The centrality of the Famine workhouse as a place of destitution is also examined in depth. Likewise the atlas represents and documents the conditions and experiences of the many thousands who emigrated from Ireland in those desperate years, with case studies of famine emigrants in cities such as Liverpool, Glasgow, New York and Toronto.
The Atlas places the devastating Irish Famine in greater historic context than has been attempted before, by including over 150 original maps of population decline, analysis and examples of poetry, contemporary art, written and oral accounts, numerous illustrations, and photography, all of which help to paint a fuller picture of the event and to trace its impact and legacy. In this comprehensive and stunningly illustrated volume, over fifty chapters on history, politics, geography, art, population, and folklore provide readers with a broad range of perspectives and insights into this event.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
By the mid-1830s, one-third of the Irish population depended on the potato for 90 percent of its food. Failures of the potato crops beginning in 1845 and the onset of blight in 1846 contributed to more than a million people perishing of hunger in Ireland between 1845 and 1852. It was the greatest social disaster to occur in one country in the 19th century. Perhaps a million and a half emigrated overseas, primarily to the United States, Canada, and Australia, and still others moved to British slums. This work offers accounts found in written and oral sources, and poetry, art, and photography, all enhanced by 200 new digitized maps to create a picture of this pivotal event.

(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814771488
  • Publisher: New York University Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2012
  • Pages: 728
  • Sales rank: 818,085
  • Product dimensions: 9.70 (w) x 11.70 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

John Crowley is Lecturer in the Department of Geography, University College Cork. He is co-editor of the Atlas of Cork City and co-author of The Iveragh Peninsula: A Cultural Atlas of the Ring of Kerry with John Sheehan.

William J. Smyth is Emeritus Professor (and former Department Chair) of Geography at University College Cork. He is author of Map-making, Landscapes and Memory: A Geography of Colonial and Early Modern Ireland, co-editor of Common Ground: Essays on the Historical Geography of Ireland, and editor of the journal Irish Geography.

Mike Murphy has been cartographer at the Department of Geography, University College Cork for the past twenty-five years. He has worked on the Atlas of Cork City (2005) and The Iveragh Peninsula: A Cultural Atlas of the Ring of Kerry (2009).

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