Atlas of the Year 1000

Atlas of the Year 1000

by John Man
     
 
Atlas of the Year 1000 takes readers on a voyage of discovery around the world at the turn of the last millennium, when for the first time the world was in essence a unity, when peoples reached out to create links and put isolated cultures unwittingly in touch. John Man vividly captures the epochal events, and depicts the colorful peoples that defined the world

Overview

Atlas of the Year 1000 takes readers on a voyage of discovery around the world at the turn of the last millennium, when for the first time the world was in essence a unity, when peoples reached out to create links and put isolated cultures unwittingly in touch. John Man vividly captures the epochal events, and depicts the colorful peoples that defined the world's mix of stability and change, of isolation and contact. In the immensely learned portrayal, he traces enduring cultural strands that became part of the world as we know it today.

Editorial Reviews

Science News
Man offers a fresh look at the world at the dawn of the past millennium.
KLIATT
In this remarkable overview of the world's diverse cultures as they existed at the turn of the first millennium, the historian and travel writer John Man offers the intriguing thesis that the year 1000 or thereabouts represented the first time in history in which nearly every culture on earth had a direct or indirect connection to every other. While Islamic traders in Baghdad were exchanging goods and ideas with their African and Byzantine neighbors, the Vikings were busy spreading their culture not only to the coast of Europe, where feudal lords and the church of Rome competed for dominance, but to the distant shores of North America as well. There, native cultural traditions thrived from the northernmost Inuit, whose ancestors had long ago crossed the Bering Strait, to the bison-hunters of the prairies and on southward to the great civilizations of Mexico and the Andes. At the same time, Chinese and Indian traders were traveling throughout Asia, spreading their ancient civilizations to the Indonesian islands and returning with rare spices to export to their neighbors in Central Asia and beyond. The deceptively slender book makes ample use of colorful maps and photographs along with highly readable text to offer an exciting glimpse into dozens of diverse cultures as they existed a thousand years ago. A general introduction to each geographical area is followed by detailed, but never didactic, accounts of the major cultural groups existing within each region. Curious readers of all ages can open the book at random to enjoy a fascinating and informative look into the human condition at the turn of the first millennium, while those with more scholarly interests will appreciate the extensivebibliography and detailed index that make this volume an excellent reference work as well. Among the historians and cultural anthropologists of the future are sure to be YA readers of today who were fortunate enough to be exposed to this well-designed and richly rewarding book. Category: History & Geography. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 1999, Harvard Univ. Press, 144p. illus. maps. bibliog. index., $19.95. Ages 13 to adult. Reviewer: Jeffrey Cooper; Writer/Editor, Long Island, NY SOURCE: KLIATT, March 2002 (Vol. 36, No. 2)
Houston Chronicle

Contrarians wearied by the hoopla surrounding the new millennium might enjoy picking up John Man's Atlas of the Year 1000 and losing themselves in the world at the turn of the last millennium...Man argues in his introduction that the year 1000 marked a historical watershed. For the first time, human societies were in contact with each other to the extent that in theory a message or an artifact could be passed all the way around the world and through every continent. So the much-touted "one world" actually began a thousand years ago...A mental journey back 1000 years is a diverting way to spend a few hours while standing in line to cross that bridge to the 21st century.
— Fritz Lanham

The Courier

We are done not only with the old century, but another millennium. Or are we? John Man in his fascinating Atlas of the Year 1000 makes two telling points. First, other faiths use calendars different from the Christian; and second, in "the year 1000...for the first time in human history it was possible to pass an object...right around the world." Such contrasts, as he vividly describes, impacted time as much as those we experience in our space age.
— Ralph Hollenbeck

Booklist

As we enter the new millennium, with the expected retrospectives, this book provides a fascinating look at the end of the previous millennium. Man, a historian and travel writer, renders an engaging account of the world in the year 1000...The book is beautifully illustrated with maps and photographs of artifacts and includes arresting sidebars on politics, religion, literature, and economics that influences events of the last millennium.
— Vanessa Bush

Forecast
A lively atlas of the world a millennium ago uses colorful maps and illustrations to reveal a surprisingly dynamic and cosmopolitan planet, with an international Islamic empire stretching across three continents and explorers from Scandinavia planting flags in the Americas.
American Reference Books Annual

A pleasant blend of cultural anthropology and cultural history, this volume re-creates the state of the known world as of the year 1000. The author has taken great pains to assemble and synthesize the best thought and research that have emanated from a number of disciplines and cultural institutions.
— Edmund F. SantaVicca

Houston Chronicle - Fritz Lanham
Contrarians wearied by the hoopla surrounding the new millennium might enjoy picking up John Man's Atlas of the Year 1000 and losing themselves in the world at the turn of the last millennium...Man argues in his introduction that the year 1000 marked a historical watershed. For the first time, human societies were in contact with each other to the extent that in theory a message or an artifact could be passed all the way around the world and through every continent. So the much-touted "one world" actually began a thousand years ago...A mental journey back 1000 years is a diverting way to spend a few hours while standing in line to cross that bridge to the 21st century.
The Courier - Ralph Hollenbeck
We are done not only with the old century, but another millennium. Or are we? John Man in his fascinating Atlas of the Year 1000 makes two telling points. First, other faiths use calendars different from the Christian; and second, in "the year 1000...for the first time in human history it was possible to pass an object...right around the world." Such contrasts, as he vividly describes, impacted time as much as those we experience in our space age.
Booklist - Vanessa Bush
As we enter the new millennium, with the expected retrospectives, this book provides a fascinating look at the end of the previous millennium. Man, a historian and travel writer, renders an engaging account of the world in the year 1000...The book is beautifully illustrated with maps and photographs of artifacts and includes arresting sidebars on politics, religion, literature, and economics that influences events of the last millennium.
American Reference Books Annual - Edmund F. Santavicca
A pleasant blend of cultural anthropology and cultural history, this volume re-creates the state of the known world as of the year 1000. The author has taken great pains to assemble and synthesize the best thought and research that have emanated from a number of disciplines and cultural institutions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674541870
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
12/28/1999
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
7.80(w) x 10.03(h) x 0.69(d)

Meet the Author

John Man, formerly the European editor for Time-Life Books, is a historian and travel writer. He is the author of Gobi: Tracking the Desert and The Atlas of D-Day. He also writes for television and radio.

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