Attack of the Killer Video Book Take 2: Tips and Tricks for Young Directors

Overview

Praise for the previous edition:
What a great book for aspiring filmmakers!
-- Voya

The kids' ultimate guide to making great videos.

These days, anyone can make a movie, but how do you make a good movie? This lighthearted and essential guide to creating video masterpieces covers all the fundamentals, from idea generation and organizing a ...

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Overview

Praise for the previous edition:
What a great book for aspiring filmmakers!
-- Voya

The kids' ultimate guide to making great videos.

These days, anyone can make a movie, but how do you make a good movie? This lighthearted and essential guide to creating video masterpieces covers all the fundamentals, from idea generation and organizing a shoot to piecing it together and the big premiere.

Originally published in 2004, Attack of the Killer Video Book has become indispensable for budding filmmakers and video production classes. This updated edition has been revised to include new technology, with hot tips on digital cameras and editing; shooting on a phone or webcam; adding cool and safe special effects; and much more.

Aspiring directors will discover tricks and techniques for becoming a camera sharpshooter; lighting like a pro; making awesome music videos; and using social networking sites to post and promote their movies. The friendly tone and hip, helpful illustrations keep information readily accessible. Attack of the Killer Video Book Take Two makes creating dynamite videos easy.

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Editorial Reviews

Girls' Life
[Review of earlier edition:] How to make awesome home movies... all the tools you need to make a killer debut film.
Booklist - GraceAnne A. DeCandidio
[Review of earlier edition:] The layout makes good use of color boxes, tips on every page, and comic-style illustrations... useful.
Canadian Materials - Grace Sheppard
[Review of earlier edition:] An excellent and funny book that will help even the creatively challenged create masterpieces of video.... They take readers step-by-step through the technical aspects [and] finishes with suggestions for hosting a video premiere party.... The book is effortlessly funny, and the authors have very cool ideas to share with their readers. All of the information is presented in short, well-labeled sections that flow naturally through the stages of video production. Each section of the book is clearly illustrated with Martha Newbigging's cartoon drawings [which] in addition to adding colour and appeal to the book, often help to clarify the concept that is being explained in the text.... With its multitude of practical tips and breezy tone, Attack of the Killer Video Book will definitely appeal to all of the young Spielbergs out there. It is also likely to inspire those who would never have considered shooting a film to try it--all film-making mysteries are revealed within. A great addition to any collection. Highly Recommended.
Family Motor Coaching - Janet Groene
[Review of earlier edition:] Great fun to read and savvy enough to provide workable tips for serious videotaping.
Grand Rapids Press - Sue Stauffacher
[Review of earlier edition:] Handy guide covers everything you need to know... This is a great book for kids: highly visual, funny and packed with information. I recommend it for your camera buff.
Resource Links - Anne Hatcher
[Review of earlier edition:] Extremely informative and humorous... An excellent resource for those aspiring to become involved in the movie production business.
CM
This is a terrific book...buy a couple of copies...in case one goes missing in action. It's that good.
Canadian Teacher Magazine - Amanda Parker
Written with youth in mind, the well-illustrated information pages about how to film and produce a video are guaranteed to grab and hold students' and teachers' attention.
If you're looking for information on integrating media into your literacy curriculum, this book includes practical, school-ready tips.
CM
This is a terrific book...buy a couple of copies...in case one goes missing in action. It's that good.
VOYA - Jennifer Rosenstein
This is an updated version of the original book published in 2004. The authors aim to provide a fun, non-intimidating introduction to the art of video production. They offer common-sense tips, an overview of some important vocabulary, and an emphasis on storytelling and having fun. Newbigging's light-hearted illustrations throughout help explain key ideas and keep the tone humorous. Shulman and Krog strive to give general tips and advice applicable no matter what camera or editing software you have. The authors encourage teens to jump in and start experimenting with visual storytelling. The book is a quick read, and the directions and advice will help any aspiring filmmaker. One of the challenges the authors acknowledge is that the available technology for recording, editing, and sharing videos is always changing. This second edition is likely to become out of date even faster than the first; however, the steps the authors lay out and their suggestions for simple effects, lighting, etc., remain useful despite changing technology. While much of this information may be available online, this book is very accessible for teens. Young people interested in filmmaking will enjoy the book, and it will help them start making and editing videos. Reviewer: Jennifer Rosenstein
Children's Literature
This how-to book is organized in appealing boxes and short sections, with lots of color and silly cartoons. The illustrations do an excellent job showing the difference, for example, among scenes that have no light, key light, fill light and backlight. There are tips on everything from planning to technique, using digital cameras to special effects, "the burden of leadership" and "the big show." There are checklists for the director, explanations of movie terms and jargon ("dailies," "it's a wrap"), a short glossary and a thorough index. The intended audience for this book, however, is primarily young people who are accustomed to pushing buttons on a computer to figure out how to play a game—not reading the directions. It is possible that students would glance through the book and become interested in making a video. It is also possible that students could turn to the index for an explanation of concepts or problems like storyboards, shadows and editing. Teachers could also draw on this book for thorough but understandable ways to show and explain some of the key elements of making a good video. 2004, Annick Press, Ages 10 up.
—Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
Gr 5-9-While video production equipment is cheaper and more accessible than ever before, and relatively high-end results can now be accomplished using consumer-grade cameras, recording decks, and/or the family's home computer, most kids fail to take advantage of this potentially rewarding hobby. This lighthearted primer uses lots of humor and colorful, cartoon-style illustrations to encourage readers to do a little planning, grab whatever video equipment and production supplies they can scrape together, and start having some big-time, creative fun making their own movies. Since the tools of the trade are rapidly changing, the book wisely avoids providing too much equipment-specific technical advice, instead focusing on the unchanging video fundamentals like scripting, storyboarding, shot selection and composition, audio, lighting, and editing basics-in short, all of the essential stuff aspiring filmmakers need to know to prevent their fledgling premieres from inducing nausea. Though light on technical detail, the book does provide enough analog and digital equipment basics to give students most of the requisite skills they'd need to start figuring out how the most common gear operates during shooting and is hooked up for post-production. A good choice for collections in need of an updated video-production guide that won't become dated too quickly.-Jeffrey Hastings, Highlander Way Middle School, Howell, MI Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Lighthearted primer uses lots of humor... big-time creative fun making their own movies... essential stuff aspiring filmmakers need to know.
— Jeffrey Hastings
Booklist
The layout makes good use of color boxes, tips on every page, and comic-style illustrations... useful.
— GraceAnne A. DeCandidio
Grand Rapids Press
A great book for kids: highly visual, funny and packed with information. I recommend it for your camera buff.
— Sue Stauffacher
Resource Links
Extremely informative and humorous... An excellent resource for those aspiring to become involved in the movie production business.
— Anne Hatcher
Canadian Materials
An excellent and funny book that will help even the creatively challenged create masterpieces of video. Highly Recommended.
— Grace Sheppard
Family Motor Coaching
Great fun to read and savvy enough to provide workable tips for serious videotaping.
— Janet Groene
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554513666
  • Publisher: Annick Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 3/20/2012
  • Edition description: Revised and Updated Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 76
  • Sales rank: 695,536
  • Age range: 10 - 18 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.30 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Shulman lives in New York and has written over 100 books for kids, including Scrawl.

Hazlitt Krog has worked in film, multimedia, and web production for 25 years.

Martha Newbigging is a graphic designer, web designer, and children's book illustrator.

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Table of Contents

The Inspiration 10
Full Team Ahead 13
The Story 15
Planning 20
The Technology 22
The Technique 24
The Special Effects 40
The Burden of Leadership 44
The Final Touches 46
The Big Show 54
Roll the End Credits 56
Tales from the Script 57
Glossary 60
Index 62
Brought to You by ... 64
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Preface


Getting Started

Even if you don't make a million dollars right away, you can make outrageously good videos. All you need is a little creativity, some patience, lots of light, and this book.* * And a video camera.

If you want to say something, see something, or save an experience forever, video is the way to go. You can create entertainment or an audiovisual diary. You can practice being a director, writer, actor, singer, or interviewer. And believe it or not, five or ten years later, you'll be happy to see what you look like at this age. Whatever you choose to do in the age of video, understanding the art and science today can help you take a starring role tomorrow.

You are very wise indeed to be reading this book. We have packed hundreds of tons of useful information and helpful hints into just 64 pages not including the font and back cover. In fact, by the time you are finished with this one page, you will know more than when you began.

For instance, video cameras don't do well when they are dropped. They are not a bath toy. And cameras are more expensive to throw than rocks. See how much you're learning?

The info in this book is a good start. We'll give you the basics, from thinking to planning to shooting to editing, without being scary. And then we'll let you loose on the world. Every videomaker has a story to tell. Just press the REC button, and tell it.


Road Map


The Inspiration


When video ideas come in a brainstorm, it's customary to shout "Eureka!" a brand of vacuum cleaner. Some people shout "Hoover!" or "Electrolux!" but it still means you've got a great idea for your video, and that's the first step.


Full Team Ahead


Many videos need multiple people. Some are the crew behind the camera, and others are talent loosely speaking, and others others sell popcorn on opening night. Some do all three. Don't be a maniac; moviemaking is a team sport. It's more fun to share the details of planning, scripting, shooting, and editing. Let others have input, or they'll leave you holding the camera bag.


The Story


Remember screaming about vacuum cleaners? Grab a pen and put that brilliant brainstorm on paper. This helps you keep focused when the craziness of shooting starts, and it gives your team a goal to remember. Don't forget this -- there's a quiz later: Every video tells a story, and everything in the video should help tell the story. Your video may need a script or a visual storyboard or just a loose set of notes. Without a script, you'll be shooting from the hip and probably miss your target. There are simple tricks to telling a story on video, and learning them will keep your audience coming back for more.


Planning


Preproduction is Hollywood lingo for "planning before you get in too deep." First talk with your team and makes some decisions about the equipment, costumes, locations, and more. Figure out the locations where you're going to shoot. Make a list of the props the parachute, the sword and costumes the fake nose, the Viking helmet you're using. Make sure everyone brings what they need -- or promised to bring -- before shooting starts. Write down your shooting schedule. It sounds like homework, but that's only because it is homework.


The Technology


Want to know what it takes to get rolling right away? Having a camera's a good start. Buy, beg, or borrow, but don't steal one. You won't need the latest and greatest. A 20-year-old camera can do the job nicely. A videotape is also useful, and so are a few other essentials to get before you get started.


The Technique


Do yourself a favor. Do your audience a favor. Learn the basics of holding a camera, moving a camera, zooming the lens, controlling the sound, controlling the light, and controlling your stomach when it starts growling. You won't believe the difference a little learning can make.


The Special Effects


You may not have the Star Wars budget of George Lucas, but you can have his imagination. With real-time visual effects, sound effects, and camera tricks, you'll shock and amaze everyone. Especially yourself.


The Burden of Leadership


Remember the days when directors screamed through megaphones and carried little whips? Neither do we. Camera skills and writing skills are important, but directing is also about people skills. Use them the skills or lose them the people.


The Final Touches


Once you've got everything you need on tape, you're mostly done. Now comes the polishing part. Final editing helps the pieces come together. Adding music, titles, and other effects will help make your mild-mannered move a marvelous masterpiece.


The Big Show


Premiere means "first," so be sure your first show is first class. Make invitations. Make posters. Make popcorn. Make them be quiet. You've put a lot of time into your video. Keep them in their seats without using glue.

Roll the End Credits

Tales from the Script

Glossary

Index

Brought to You by...

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Getting Started

Even if you don't make a million dollars right away, you can make outrageously good videos. All you need is a little creativity, some patience, lots of light, and this book.* (* And a video camera.)

If you want to say something, see something, or save an experience forever, video is the way to go. You can create entertainment or an audiovisual diary. You can practice being a director, writer, actor, singer, or interviewer. And believe it or not, five or ten years later, you'll be happy to see what you look like at this age. Whatever you choose to do in the age of video, understanding the art and science today can help you take a starring role tomorrow.

You are very wise indeed to be reading this book. We have packed hundreds of tons of useful information and helpful hints into just 64 pages (not including the font and back cover). In fact, by the time you are finished with this one page, you will know more than when you began.

For instance, video cameras don't do well when they are dropped. They are not a bath toy. And cameras are more expensive to throw than rocks. See how much you're learning?

The info in this book is a good start. We'll give you the basics, from thinking to planning to shooting to editing, without being scary. And then we'll let you loose on the world. Every videomaker has a story to tell. Just press the REC button, and tell it.

Road Map

The Inspiration

When video ideas come in a brainstorm, it's customary to shout "Eureka!" (a brand of vacuum cleaner). Some people shout "Hoover!" or "Electrolux!" but it still means you've got a great idea for your video, and that's the firststep.

Full Team Ahead

Many videos need multiple people. Some are the crew (behind the camera), and others are talent (loosely speaking), and others others sell popcorn on opening night. Some do all three. Don't be a maniac; moviemaking is a team sport. It's more fun to share the details of planning, scripting, shooting, and editing. Let others have input, or they'll leave you holding the camera bag.

The Story

Remember screaming about vacuum cleaners? Grab a pen and put that brilliant brainstorm on paper. This helps you keep focused when the craziness of shooting starts, and it gives your team a goal to remember. Don't forget this -- there's a quiz later: Every video tells a story, and everything in the video should help tell the story. Your video may need a script or a visual storyboard or just a loose set of notes. Without a script, you'll be shooting from the hip and probably miss your target. There are simple tricks to telling a story on video, and learning them will keep your audience coming back for more.

Planning

Preproduction is Hollywood lingo for "planning before you get in too deep." First talk with your team and makes some decisions about the equipment, costumes, locations, and more. Figure out the locations where you're going to shoot. Make a list of the props (the parachute, the sword) and costumes (the fake nose, the Viking helmet) you're using. Make sure everyone brings what they need -- or promised to bring -- before shooting starts. Write down your shooting schedule. It sounds like homework, but that's only because it is homework.

The Technology

Want to know what it takes to get rolling right away? Having a camera's a good start. Buy, beg, or borrow, but don't steal one. You won't need the latest and greatest. A 20-year-old camera can do the job nicely. A videotape is also useful, and so are a few other essentials to get before you get started.

The Technique

Do yourself a favor. Do your audience a favor. Learn the basics of holding a camera, moving a camera, zooming the lens, controlling the sound, controlling the light, and controlling your stomach when it starts growling. You won't believe the difference a little learning can make.

The Special Effects

You may not have the Star Wars budget of George Lucas, but you can have his imagination. With real-time visual effects, sound effects, and camera tricks, you'll shock and amaze everyone. Especially yourself.

The Burden of Leadership

Remember the days when directors screamed through megaphones and carried little whips? Neither do we. Camera skills and writing skills are important, but directing is also about people skills. Use them (the skills) or lose them (the people).

The Final Touches

Once you've got everything you need on tape, you're mostly done. Now comes the polishing part. Final editing helps the pieces come together. Adding music, titles, and other effects will help make your mild-mannered move a marvelous masterpiece.

The Big Show

Premiere means "first," so be sure your first show is first class. Make invitations. Make posters. Make popcorn. Make them be quiet. You've put a lot of time into your video. Keep them in their seats without using glue.

Roll the End Credits
Tales from the Script
Glossary
Index
Brought to You by...

Read More Show Less

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