Auction
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Auction

by Tres Seymour, Cat Bowman Smith
     
 
Tres Seymour's lively story is humorously brought to life by Cat Bowman Smith's down-home illustrations.

"Whee-oo!" When Aunt Lou hears there's a county auction coming up, she can't contain her excitement (as her young niece observes). But when she and the family arrive at the auction site, Aunt Lou comes face to face with her long-standing rival,

Overview

Tres Seymour's lively story is humorously brought to life by Cat Bowman Smith's down-home illustrations.

"Whee-oo!" When Aunt Lou hears there's a county auction coming up, she can't contain her excitement (as her young niece observes). But when she and the family arrive at the auction site, Aunt Lou comes face to face with her long-standing rival, Miss Logsdon. One look makes clear that these ladies can't stand to lose to each other, even when bidding on such dubious treasures as old china, a stuffed groundhog, or a zinc tub. Aunt Lou's niece has her eye on a straw hat — the spitting image of Daddy's — which fits her better than her own hair. But can anyone outbid Aunt Lou and Miss Logsdon when they get going?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Our young narrator shares the excitement of a county auction with us. She and her whole family arrive to see her Aunt Lou and her teacher Miss Logsdon confront each other. Since nobody seems to be able to outbid them, some folks go on home. The bidding is a wild match between them. Meanwhile our apprehensive narrator has her eye on a special straw hat, and only a dollar in her pocket. The two women get going on that hat. They reach ninety-five cents, when she bravely shouts "A dollar bill!" Nobody has ever tried to outbid the pair before. Amid shocked silence, she gets her hat, to the delight of her family and herself. On the jacket/cover Smith provides a preview of the happy departing shoppers in their overloaded vehicles, conveying the spirit of the event while presenting the characters. Brown ink and watercolors produce double-page scenes rich with details of the family home and, it seems, of every object up for auction. Boldface type is used effectively for the voices of auctioneer and bidders. Exaggerated gestures and expressions amuse as they convey the spirit of the auction. 2005, Candlewick Press, Ages 6 to 9.
—Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-A little girl with a hard-earned dollar in hand attends an auction with her family and spies a straw hat that is "-the spitting image of Daddy's." Veteran auction-goers Aunt Lou and the girl's teacher, Miss Logsdon, engage in their usual bidding wars on a number of coveted items, including a stuffed groundhog. When bidding on the old straw hat begins at 25 cents, the two women drive the price up to 95 cents. Just at the last moment, the child calls out her bid of "A dollar bill!" The two older competitors are rendered speechless, the little girl gets her hat, and she is forever known as "-the only person who ever outbid Aunt Lou and Miss Logsdon when they got going." Youngsters will relate to the girl's serendipitous discovery of the hat and her successful quest to obtain it. Smith's detailed, muted watercolor illustrations add to the humor and movement of this satirical story. Adding to the realism, auctioneer Bubba Philpott's bullhorn practically takes on a life of its own with the drone of his repetitive phrases, which are arranged in semicircular patterns and help to re-create the pace of a heated auction when read aloud.-Lynda Ritterman, Atco Elementary School, Waterford, NJ Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Aunt Lou loves an auction "better than anything," so when auction day comes, the entire family ventures forth to see what treasures might lurk among the kerosene lamps, toasters, stuffed groundhogs and plastic flowers. Aunt Lou's niece, the narrator, spots a gem right away-a straw hat just like her daddy's: "I tried it on, and it fit me / better than my own hair." She just hopes her overzealous aunt and her aunt's longtime bidding rival Miss Logsdon don't get their hands on it first. This is a fun, folksy introduction to the psychology, rules and singsong rhythms of an auction, complete with down-home feel (the author's from Kentucky) and happy ending, as the gleeful hat-wearing girl at the end will testify. Auctioneer Bubba Philpott's rapid-fire chant ("Do I hear three dollah three dollah / three dollah three dollah / who'll go three?") appears in swooping bold sans-serif type for added effect, and Smith's comical watercolor-and-ink illustrations are as lively and friendly as the story. "Whee-oo!" as Aunt Lou would say. (Picture book. 7-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763612429
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
04/12/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.13(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.34(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Tres Seymour was born in Kentucky and spent his childhood in Tennessee. He is a prolific author of books for young readers, including JAKE JOHNSON: THE STORY OF A MULE, illustrated by Martha Gray Carrington; OUR NEIGHBOR IS A STRANGE, STRANGE MAN, illustrated by Walter Lyon Krudop; HUNTING THE WHITE COW, illustrated by Wendy Anderson Halperin; and WE PLAYED MARBLES, illustrated by Dan Andreasen. He now lives in Kentucky and works as a National Park Service ranger at Mammoth Cave National Park. This is his first book with Candlewick Press.

Cat Bowman Smith is the illustrator of many books for young readers, such as THE ROSIE STORIES by Cynthia Voigt, OLD GRANNY AND THE BEAN THIEF by Cynthia DeFelice, and THE TROUBLE WITH CATS and THE TROUBLE WITH BABIES by Martha Freeman. This is her first book with Candlewick Press.

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