Audition Arsenal for Women in Their 30s: 101 Monologues by Type, 2 Minutes and under (Monologue Audition Series)

( 2 )

Overview

Prepare your audition repertoire with the most innovative monologue series to date-Audition Arsenal! Are you tired of buying monologue books only to discard half of the pieces because they are outside of your age range? Not anymore! The first four books in this breakthrough series are for:

Women in their 20s Men in their 20s
Women in their...
See more details below
Paperback
$14.95
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $9.49   
  • Used (7) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Prepare your audition repertoire with the most innovative monologue series to date-Audition Arsenal! Are you tired of buying monologue books only to discard half of the pieces because they are outside of your age range? Not anymore! The first four books in this breakthrough series are for:

Women in their 20s Men in their 20s
Women in their 30s Men in their 30s

That means 101 monologues per book, 2 minutes and under, that are all usable by you! And it gets even better.The Audition Arsenal books are organized by type so you will have dynamic, memorable, contemporary monologues that demonstrate your ability to handle any role. Each type is defined by a specific personality trait, allowing you to showcase the qualities crucial to a particular character or role. In addition, choosing contrasting types is a great way to show your range in general auditions. The types are broken down by tone-comedic, dramatic, or seriocomic. Searching is easy, accurate, and fun! Here are the types you will find in this book:
Wacky/Quirky/Odd Awkward/Nervous/Uneasy
High-Strung/Neurotic/Stressed-Out Romantic/In Love
Angry/Fed Up Melodramatic
Vulnerable/Hurt/Exposed Joyful/Enthusiastic/Excited
Persuasive/Inspirational Troubled/PainedThe Audition Arsenal series is a priceless resource for acting teachers and coaches, and the perfect tool to prepare you to land your next role-no matter what it calls for. Monologues for your gender, in your age range, by type and tone- getting cast has never been this easy!
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booklist
"Young actors who have searched for audition material written in the voice of teenage characters will welcome this resource."
Smith and Kraus
"Janet Milstein's Ultimate Audition Book for Teens Volume I is our all-time best seller."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781575253985
  • Publisher: Smith & Kraus, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/28/2005
  • Series: Monologue Audition Series
  • Pages: 115
  • Sales rank: 810,224
  • Product dimensions: 10.52 (w) x 3.80 (h) x 0.28 (d)

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION xi
TIPS FOR SELECTING AND PREPARING A MONOLOGUE xiv

Wacky/Quirky/Odd
The Vegan by Keith Tadrowski (comic)   -1
Hungover from the 80s by Adrien Royce (comic)   -2
Unethical Dilemma from Occupational Hazards by Mark McCarthy
(comic)   -3
Asian Invasion by Lauren D. Yee (comic)   -5
In Ted's Garage from Face Value by Janet Allard (comic)   -7
Dog Stories by Keith Huff (comic)   -8
Posada by Jeremy Menekseoglu (comic)   -9
Bethlehem, PA by Suzanne Bradbeer (comic)   -10
A Long Hard Rain by Jason Furlani (comic)   -11
The Celery Conspiracy by Merri Biechler (comic)   -12

Maternal
Away Message by Kelly DuMar (comic)   -13
Acceptance Letter by Barbara Lhota and Janet B. Milstein (dramatic)   -14
Golden Gate by Linda Eisenstein (dramatic)   -15
Baby Talk by Jeanne Dorsey (seriocomic)   -16
Twin Towers by Ira Brodsky and Barbara Lhota (dramatic)   -17
If This Isn't Love by Jonathan Bernstein (seriocomic)   -18
Lone Star Grace by Suzanne Bradbeer (dramatic)   -19
The Journal by Barbara Lhota and Janet B. Milstein (dramatic)   -20
Day Care by Cynthia Franks (dramatic)   -21

Joyful/Enthusiastic/Excited
Tales from the SaltMines by Mara Lathrop (comic)   -23
Lone Star Grace by Suzanne Bradbeer (comic)   -24
Lone Star Grace by Suzanne Bradbeer (comic)   -25
Cosmic Goofs by Barbara Lindsay (comic)   -26
Golden Gate by Linda Eisenstein (seriocomic)   -27
Erratica by Reina Hardy (comic)   -28
The Slow Convenience by Adam Simon (seriocomic)   -29
Thing Quartet by Mark Harvey Levine (seriocomic)   -30

Blunt/Direct
Nice Tie from Romantic Fools by Rich Orloff (comic)   -31
Don't Call Me Loretta by Nancy Gall-Clayton (comic)   -32
Epiphany Cake by Kelly Younger (dramatic)   -33
The Usual by Barbara Lindsay (seriocomic)   -34
Bookends by Jonathan Dorf (comic)   -35
Air Traffic by Lauren D. Yee (comic)   -36
Hub by Ann Garner (dramatic)   -37
Jihad Jones and the Kalashnikov Babes by Yussef El Guindi (comic)   -38
Sueño by Scott McMorrow (dramatic)   -39

Vulnerable/Hurt/Exposed
Among Friends and Clutter by Lindsay Price (dramatic)  -40
The Mating Habits of Frogs by Barbara Lhota
and Ira Brodsky (dramatic)   -41
Couldn't Say by Christopher Wall (dramatic)   -42
A Bushel of Crabs by Kathleen Warnock (dramatic)   -43
Jello Shot by Christopher Wall (dramatic)   -44
The Wars of Attrition by Suzanne Bradbeer (seriocomic)   -45
Mornings After by Kate Monaghan (dramatic)   -46
Lie Down with Dogs by N. M. Brewka (dramatic)   -47
Razing the 'Rents by Cynthia Franks (dramatic)   -48
Red Light, Green Light by Erik Patterson (dramatic)   -49


Melodramatic
The Mandible by Elaine M. Hazzard (comic)   -50
Lucy Devil Has Wealth Syndrome by Chris Howlett (seriocomic)   -51
Possums by Keith Huff (seriocomic)   -52
High Noon by Jo J. Adamson (comic)   -53
Rapture by Ruth Tyndall Baker (seriocomic)   -54
Mercy Falls by Jeni Mahoney (seriocomic)   -55
Fear and Loathing on the Nile by Suzanne Bradbeer (comic)   -56
To Mrs. Robinson by Barbara Lhota and Ira Brodsky (comic)   -57

Angry/Fed up
Last Love by Peter Papadopoulos (seriocomic)   -58
Fast Friends by Adrien Royce (dramatic) 60
Hurricane Iris by Justin Warner (seriocomic) 62
Black Flamingos by Julius Galacki (dramatic) 63
The B Side by Katharine Clark Gray (comic) 64
Lonely Girl by Cameron Rabie (dramatic) 65
The Abundance by Paul Heller (dramatic) 66
Erratica by Reina Hardy (comic) 67
While the Baby Sleeps by Aline Lathrop (dramatic) 68
Visions from The Food Monologues by Kerri Kochanski (dramatic) 69

Persuasive/Inspirational
Queen Bee by Dennis Schebetta (seriocomic)   -70
Jersey by Hugh Fitzgerald (seriocomic)   -72
An Unfinished Room by Mark Rosenwinkel (seriocomic)   -73
Tweaking by Barbara Lhota and Ira Brodsky (comic)   -74
Painting by Numbers by Dennis Schebetta (seriocomic)   -75
Riot Standard by Katharine Clark Gray (seriocomic)   -76
Privates by Janet Allard (comic)   -77
Erratica by Reina Hardy (comic)   -78

High-strung/Neurotic/stressed-out
"Will You Please Shut Up?" by Dan O'Brien (comic)   -79
Hungover from the   -80s by Adrien Royce (comic)   -80
Avenging Grace by Terri Campion (seriocomic)   -81
Dangerous Times by Jean Reynolds (seriocomic)   -82
Mercy Falls by Jeni Mahoney (seriocomic)   -83
Paintings from The Van Gogh Exhibit by Matt Fotis (comic)   -84
Meal Ticket by Kit Wainer (comic)   -85
Missed Connections by Barbara Lhota and Ira Brodsky (comic)   -86
Off Compass by Kelly Younger (seriocomic)   -87
Neurotic Splendor by Adrien Royce (comic)   -88
Lonely/Yearning
Almost Full Circle at the Guggenheim by Dianne M. Sposito
(seriocomic)   -89
Better Places to Go by David-Matthew Barnes (seriocomic)   -90
Romance by Barbara Lhota (seriocomic)   -91
Carnality by Mark Loewenstern (dramatic)   -92
The Space Between Heartbeats by Kathleen Warnock (dramatic)   -93
Baby Talk by Jeanne Dorsey (seriocomic)   -94
Erin Go Bragh-less by John Shea (dramatic)   -95
Heaven and Home by Matthew A. Everett (seriocomic)   -97
The Test by Paul Kahn (dramatic)   -98

Sexual/Flirtatious
Brave New Tiger by Diane Lefer (seriocomic)   -99
From Zero to Sixty in 3.5 Seconds by Deni Krueger (dramatic)   -100
Green-Eyed Monster by Dennis Schebetta (comic)   -101
Mutual Mastication by Justin Warner (comic)   -102
Hot Tub Haggle by Werner Trieschmann (comic)   -103
Phoebe Makes the News by Terri Campion (comic)   -104
Stages by Jennifer Kirkeby (comic)   -105
Herbert and Marian in the Attic by Matthew J. Hanson (comic)   -106
Imagine the Love from Everyman by Elena Kaufman (comic)   -107
Elliot (A Soldier's Fugue) by Quiara Alegria Hudes (dramatic)   -108
Read More Show Less

Introduction

Redefining the monologue book.
When Eric Kraus approached me about editing a new series of monologue books based on character type, some questions immediately came to mind: Was this type as in theater or film? Most specific types fall under film, yet monologues are rarely used for film or on-camera. For theater there are really only three main types: Leading Man/Lady, Ingénue/Young Man, and Character Actors. If I wanted to offer more detailed types, what criteria would be most useful? Would profession be considered a type? How about funny? Could social status define type?In addition, I considered what was needed in a monologue book that had not yet been addressed. How would I improve upon the monologue books I own? What would make a book more valuable? How could I create a book to solve the problems my students are constantly voicing? As an actor, writer, and monologue coach, I wanted this new monologue series to give actors what they truly need for auditions. I had my own ideas about what I would find useful, but I decided to poll some actors to get their input, as well. The actors had a lot of common requests that confirmed my initial instincts. Most importantly this series would need to maximize the number of monologues an actor would actually use from one source. To do that, the traditional monologue book would need to be reinvented. How are the books in this series better?
When I was studying acting in college, I'd always wished that there were monologue books just for actors in their twenties. And my dream books would have taken it a step further and been separated by gender to increase the number of monologues in one book that specifically applied to me. Now, I am presenting that to you - Women 20s, Men 20s, Women 30s, and Men 30s. No more skipping over pages and pages because the characters are out of your age range or not for your gender. Within each book, the choices are plentiful, and you're sure to find pieces that fit your specific needs. That brings me to the next revolutionary feature of the Audition Arsenal series: The books are organized by type. By type, I'm referring to the most prominent quality the monologue reveals about the actor. So instead of being typed somewhat generically (e.g., waitress or Ingénue), the monologues are designed to show you possess the qualities crucial to a particular character or role. Auditioning for a Harry Kondoleon play? Check out the High-strung/Neurotic/Stressed-Out category. Want to get a callback for that Durang play? Prepare one of the Wacky/Quirky/Odd pieces. Not only can you use these monologues to audition for a specific role, but you can use them to show your range in general auditions. When asked to prepare two contrasting pieces, you can go beyond simply a comedic and a dramatic (or a contemporary and a classical, if requested), and demonstrate significantly contrasting personas. Put yourself in the director's chair. Which would be more interesting to see an actor perform - a blunt, strong comedic piece with a blunt, strong dramatic piece or a vulnerable comedic piece with an intimidating/dangerous dramatic? As actors, we must remember that directors are often meeting us for the first time and might assume that we can play only what we show them. So by all means show them! Think of the different impressions you make with your classmates versus coworkers, or on a first date versus a job interview. The pieces you choose tell directors something about you and your capabilities. Sell your strengths, cast yourself against your usual type, and prepare your personal "arsenal" of monologues so you'll be ready for any upcoming audition - no matter what it calls for.Here are some additional bonuses you'll find in this series:
* The monologues are two minutes and under - some are one minute and under - to fit the time constraints of auditions.
* Very few, if any, of the monologues sound classical. Why? If you are required to do a classical and a contemporary monologue, you want them to contrast as much as possible.
* Only a small number of the monologues require dialects or accents. Why? The rule of thumb is to avoid dialect pieces in auditions unless they are specifically requested. If your accent is not dead-on directors tend to focus on the accent rather than the acting.
* There are 101 monologues to choose from in each book!
* The monologues are from plays as opposed to self-contained pieces. Some of the writers, kindly, at my request, edited the pieces slightly or pasted dialogue so that the monologues would be better suited to audition situations. However, when you read the play, you will see the bulk of the monologue in the same form and that the character and his or her situation have not changed.
* I have included a Tips section in each book containing helpful information that pertains to the selection and preparation of monologues. I hope you find this new monologue series to be as valuable, time-saving, and innovative as I have set out to make it. In this particular book, I anticipate that you'll find a plethora of monologues to use for upcoming auditions. But don't let that stop you from checking out all of the books in the Audition Arsenal series. I wish you the best of luck in all of your endeavors. And when auditioning, have fun and break a leg!
Janet B. Milstein
Read More Show Less

Foreword

Prepare your audition repertoire with the most innovative monologue series to date-Audition Arsenal! Are you tired of buying monologue books only to discard half of the pieces because they are outside of your age range? Not anymore! The first four books in this breakthrough series are for:

Women in their 20s Men in their 20s
Women in their 30s Men in their 30s

That means 101 monologues per book, 2 minutes and under, that are all usable by you! And it gets even better.The Audition Arsenal books are organized by type so you will have dynamic, memorable, contemporary monologues that demonstrate your ability to handle any role. Each type is defined by a specific personality trait, allowing you to showcase the qualities crucial to a particular character or role. In addition, choosing contrasting types is a great way to show your range in general auditions. The types are broken down by tone-comedic, dramatic, or seriocomic. Searching is easy, accurate, and fun! Here are the types you will find in this book:
Wacky, Quirky, Odd Maternal
High-strung, Neurotic, Stressed-out Sexual, Flirtatious
Blunt, Direct Melodramatic
Angry, Fed up Lonely, Yearning
Vulnerable, Hurt, Exposed Joyful, Enthusiastic, Excited
Persuasive, InspirationalThe Audition Arsenal series is a priceless resource for acting teachers and coaches, and the perfect tool to prepare you to land your next role-no matter what it calls for. Monologues for your gender, in your age range, by type and tone-getting cast has never been this easy!
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 15, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Book of Monologues that are NOT overdone! A steal!

    In this book, the editor, Ms. Milstein, says in the Introduction & Choosing Monologues section that some of the plays are not published yet or harder to find but she chose them to make sure actors would find brand new hidden gems to audition with. She also had all of the playwrights agree to email out the scripts if you couldn't find them at your favorite bookstore because she stresses the importance of reading the entire play. There is a list of contact info (most have email addresses listed so it's quick and easy) for each playwright. I have written to a few and got the plays for free and quickly!! How wonderful not to worry that the piece has been overdone!

    The monologues in the book are divided into Type by the emotion/quality they will show off to the directors. Which is a unique and brilliant way to build a repertoire so you are ready for any audition that comes up. I give this book 5 stars!

    P.S. I teach acting and have several of Ms. Milstein's books and her material is consistently good.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)