Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Supporting Children and Adults with Complex Communication Needs / Edition 4

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Overview

The fourth edition of the foundational, widely adopted AAC textbook Augmentative and Alternative Communication is the definitive introduction to AAC processes, interventions, and technologies that help people best meet their daily communication needs. Future teachers, SLPs, OTs, PTs, and other professionals will prepare for their work in the field with critical new information on

advancing literacy skills

conducting effective, culturally appropriate assessment and intervention

selecting AAC vocabulary tailored to individual needs

using new consumer technologies as affordable, nonstigmatizing communication device

promoting social competence

supporting language learning and development

providing effective support to beginning communicators

planning inclusive education services for students with complex communication needs

improving the communication of people with specific developmental disabilities and acquired disabilities

An essential core text for tomorrow's professionals-and a key reference for inservice practitioners-this fourth edition expertly prepares readers to supports the communicative competence of children and adults with a wide range of complex needs.

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Editorial Reviews

Joe Reichle

"A tour-de-force . . . should be on the shelf of everyone with a stake in advancing the field of AAC. This book has my strongest possible endorsement."
Department of Special Education and Communicative Disorders, San Francisco State University - Gloria Soto
"Beukelman and Mirenda have done it again. This fourth edition is the most comprehensive and thorough guide for providing AAC services to individuals with a range of disabilities, needs, and ages . . . A must have!"
University of Virginia - Filip Loncke
"Gives a sound theoretical background while providing a wide scale of applications . . . The reader of this book will feel reassured to find that our understanding of complex communication needs is now based on sound research and that applications are based on evidence."
University of Nebraska-Lincoln - Cynthia Cress
"Highly recommended . . . This is the one book that no one who uses or works in the field of AAC should be without."
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Lorin N. Youngdahl, M.A. Speech language pathology(George Washington University)
Description: This book provides a solid foundation of what augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is and how it can be used as an option for those with complex and more severe communication needs. This introductory text provides a wealth of information on AAC as it relates to not only speech-language pathology but also other disciplines, patients, and families.
Purpose: The objective is to introduce readers, particularly practicing professionals, preprofessional students, and facilitators to communication options for people who are unable to meet their daily communication needs through natural modes because of a severe communication disorder. This is a worthy objective because the AAC field is growing and evolving. Therefore, continuing to provide updated information on the field and particularly on what the current communication options are for those with severe, complex communication needs is imperative. The book meets the author's objective.
Audience: This book is written for current practitioners in AAC wishing to learn more, update their knowledge, and have a reference. It is also a great introductory text for students and those new to the AAC field. The author states that this book was written for professionals, students, and facilitators.
Features: The book covers what the AAC processes are and introduces readers to AAC in general. It also provides information on messages types, unaided and aided symbol systems, and access options for those with complex communication needs. It also reviews multidisciplinary teams and how different professionals are involved in the assessment process and intervention. Several of the chapters focus on interventions keeping in mind unique concerns related to individuals with different acquired or developmental disorders. Specifically, the last few chapters of the book describe in greater detail those individuals with acquired disorders who can benefit from AAC and what those disorders are. Several chapters describe how to develop language and literacy further using AAC and how to integrate AAC systems into schools and home. The chapters on acquired disorders are well written and provided updated, valuable information. The book could use photographs to display several of the interventions, strategies, and models. The tables are well laid out.
Assessment: This book is of excellent quality. It will be extremely useful to those practicing in the field of AAC or who are getting prepared to practice. I would not recommend this book for those outside of the field of speech-language pathology given the technical terminology used throughout the text. The third edition is very important because of the constant changes in ACC, advances in technology, and improvements that practitioners need to know.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Lorin N. Youngdahl, M.A. Speech language pathology(George Washington University)
Description: This book provides a solid foundation of what augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is and how it can be used as an option for those with complex and more severe communication needs. This introductory text provides a wealth of information on AAC as it relates to not only speech-language pathology but also other disciplines, patients, and families.
Purpose: The objective is to introduce readers, particularly practicing professionals, preprofessional students, and facilitators to communication options for people who are unable to meet their daily communication needs through natural modes because of a severe communication disorder. This is a worthy objective because the AAC field is growing and evolving. Therefore, continuing to provide updated information on the field and particularly on what the current communication options are for those with severe, complex communication needs is imperative. The book meets the author's objective.
Audience: This book is written for current practitioners in AAC wishing to learn more, update their knowledge, and have a reference. It is also a great introductory text for students and those new to the AAC field. The author states that this book was written for professionals, students, and facilitators.
Features: The book covers what the AAC processes are and introduces readers to AAC in general. It also provides information on messages types, unaided and aided symbol systems, and access options for those with complex communication needs. It also reviews multidisciplinary teams and how different professionals are involved in the assessment process and intervention. Several of the chapters focus on interventions keeping in mind unique concerns related to individuals with different acquired or developmental disorders. Specifically, the last few chapters of the book describe in greater detail those individuals with acquired disorders who can benefit from AAC and what those disorders are. Several chapters describe how to develop language and literacy further using AAC and how to integrate AAC systems into schools and home. The chapters on acquired disorders are well written and provided updated, valuable information. The book could use photographs to display several of the interventions, strategies, and models. The tables are well laid out.
Assessment: This book is of excellent quality. It will be extremely useful to those practicing in the field of AAC or who are getting prepared to practice. I would not recommend this book for those outside of the field of speech-language pathology given the technical terminology used throughout the text. The third edition is very important because of the constant changes in ACC, advances in technology, and improvements that practitioners need to know.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781598571967
  • Publisher: Brookes Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/28/2012
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 616
  • Sales rank: 159,714
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

David R. Beukelman, Ph.D is the Barkley Professor of Communication Disorders at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Director of Research and Education of the Communication Disorders Division, Munroe/Meyer Institute of Genetics and Rehabilitation at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, A research partner in the Rehabilitation Engineering and Research Center in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, and a senior researcher in the Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at the Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital. With Pat Mirenda, he co-authored the textbook, Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Management of Severe Communication Disorders in Children and Adults. He served as editor of the Augmentative and Alternative Communication Journal for four years.

Janice Light, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at the Pennsylvania State University. She is actively involved in research, personnel preparation, and service delivery in the area of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Her primary interest has been furthering understanding of the development of communicative competence and self-determination by individuals who require AAC.

Dr. Light is the principal investigator on several federally-funded research grants to improve outcomes for individuals who have significant communication disabilities through the use of augmentative and alternative communication. She is one of the project directors in the Augmentative and Alternative Communication Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (AAC-RERC), a virtual research consortium funded by the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

In 1996, Dr. Light was recognized as the Don Johnston Distinguished Lecturer by the International Society of Augmentative and Alternative Communication for her leadership in the AAC field. In 1999, she received the Dorothy Jones Barnes Outstanding Teaching Award at the Pennsylvania State University.

Dr. Mirenda earned her doctorate in behavioral disabilities from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. For 8 years, she was a faculty member in the Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska–Lincoln. From 1992 to 1996, she provided a variety of training, research, and support services to individuals with severe disabilities through CBI Consultants, Ltd., in Vancouver, British Columbia. She is now Professor in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia. From 1998 to 2001, she was editor of the journal Augmentative and Alternative Communication. In 2004, she was named a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and was awarded the Killam Teaching Prize at the University of British Columbia. In 2008, she was named a Fellow of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Dr. Mirenda is the author of numerous book chapters and research publications; she lectures widely and teaches courses on augmentative and alternative communication, inclusive education, developmental disabilities, autism, and positive behavior support. Her current research focuses on describing the developmental trajectories of young children with autism and factors that predict the outcomes of early intervention.

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Table of Contents

About the Authors vii

About the Contributors ix

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xv

Part I Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative Communication

1 Augmentative and Alternative Communication Processes 3

2 Message Management: Vocabulary, Small Talk, and Narratives 17

3 Symbols and Rate Enhancement 37

4 Alternative Access 73

5 Principles of Assessment 101

6 Assessment of Specific Capabilities 131

7 Principles of Decision Making, Intervention, and Evaluation 187

Part II Augmentative and Alternative Communication Interventions for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

8 Augmentative and Alternative Communication Issues for People with Developmental Disabilities 203

9 Supporting Participation and Communication for Beginning Communicators 225

10 Language Development and Intervention: Challenges, Supports, and Instructional Approaches 255

11 Instruction to Support Linguistic and Social Competence 279

12 Literacy Intervention for Individuals with Complex Communication Needs Janice C. Light David B. McNaughton 309

13 Educational Inclusion of Students with Complex Communication Needs 353

Part III Augmentative and Alternative Communication Interventions for Individuals with Acquired Disabilities

14 Adults with Acquired Physical Conditions Laura Ball 379

15 Adults with Severe Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Kathryn L. Garrett Joanne P. Lasker 405

16 Adults with Degenerative Cognitive and Linguistic Disorders Elizabeth Hanson 447

17 Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury Susan Fager 461

18 Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Intensive, Acute, and Long-Term Acute Medical Settings 475

References 491

Resources and Web Links 547

Index 557

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