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August: Osage County
     

August: Osage County

4.0 34
by Tracy Letts, Deanna Dunagan (Read by), Rondi Reed (Read by)
 

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One of the most bracing and critically acclaimed plays in recent Broadway history, August: Osage County a portrait of the dysfunctional American family at its finest—and absolute worst. When the patriarch of the Weston clan disappears one hot summer night, the family reunites at the Oklahoma homestead, where long-held secrets are unflinchingly and uproariously

Overview

One of the most bracing and critically acclaimed plays in recent Broadway history, August: Osage County a portrait of the dysfunctional American family at its finest—and absolute worst. When the patriarch of the Weston clan disappears one hot summer night, the family reunites at the Oklahoma homestead, where long-held secrets are unflinchingly and uproariously revealed.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Audio
02/02/2015
With a keen ear for the Southern drawl, this sharply written play gets a stellar presentation by L.A. Theatre Works. Set over the course of several weeks, the play follows the Weston family as they are pulled back to their Oklahoma homestead in the wake of a tragedy. With uncontrolled ferocity, this dysfunctional family proceeds to bicker and battle, belittle and besmirch each other with every emotional weapon in their considerable armory. At its heart is Momma Violet, played to shrewish perfection by Deanna Dunagan: her drug-induced, nonstop vitriolic pronouncements and revelations are alternately painful and hilarious in their delivery, and the reactions and interactions of the excellent cast are just as well developed and delivered. Robert Pine, as patriarch Beverly Weston, practically steals the show in the opening scene—which is a touching and laugh-out-loud performance, perfectly delivered and totally indicative of the richly textured performances of the tragic comedy that follows. (Oct.)
Library Journal - Audio
★ 02/15/2015
Letts's razor-sharp tragicomedy was the winner of the 2008 Tony Award for Best Play and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama that same year. This full-cast production was recorded before a live audience and features members of the premier cast from Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre as well as members of the Broadway production including Deanna Dunagan and Rondi Reed. Set over the course of several sweltering August weeks at the Pawhuska, OK, home of Beverly and Violet Weston, the play depicts a family that is dysfunctional almost beyond belief. Substance abuse, incest, and suicide are just a few of the issues facing the Westons. When patriarch Beverly, a somewhat famous poet who could never finish his second book, goes missing, the Weston children and their families reluctantly trudge home to support Beverly's prescription drug-addicted, cancer-stricken wife, Violet. VERDICT All libraries collecting dramatic productions will likely want this tightly constructed, bitingly funny dark comedy, but should note the caveat that it features very mature themes and much profanity.—Beth Farrell, Cleveland State Univ. Law Lib.
From the Publisher

“This fusion of epic tragedy and black comedy is a bold step for Letts, whose earthy, distinctly contemporary wit flows throughout. His account of a family whose secrets and lies come spilling forth under duress ranks with the best American drama of the past decade.” –Elysa Gardner, USA Today

“In Tracy Letts’s ferociously entertaining play, the American dysfunctional family drama comes roaring into the twenty-first century with eyes blazing, nostrils flaring and fangs bared, laced with corrosive humor so darkly delicious and ghastly that you’re squirming in your seat even as you’re doubled over laughing. A massive meditation on the cruel realities that often belie standard expectations of conjugal and family accord—not to mention on the decline of American integrity itself.” –David Rooney, Variety

August will cement Letts’s place in theatrical history. He has written a Great American Play. How many of those will we get the chance to discover in our lifetime?” –Melissa Rose Bernardo, Entertainment Weekly

“Packed with unforgettable characters and dozens of quotable lines, August: Osage County is a tensely satisfying comedy, interspersed with remarkable evocations on the cruelties and (occasional) kindnesses of family life. It is as harrowing a new work as Broadway has offered in years and the funniest in even longer.” –Eric Gorde, New York Sun

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781580819671
Publisher:
LA Theatre Works
Publication date:
10/28/2014
Pages:
3
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 6.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Tracy Letts is the author of Killer Joe, Bug and Man From Nebraska, which was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. He is a member of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company, where August: Osage County premiered.

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August: Osage County 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
pbekkerus More than 1 year ago
I saw this play performed in Des Moines, Iowa; I thought it was hilarious. But I also knew there was a deeper layer, too, so I bought this script. This story captures life in modern day rural America. It tackles issues like suicide, drug use, sexual harrassment, divorce and-most importantly-caring for members of "the Greatest Generation." The characters are educated but honest; loveable but flawed; humorous but grave. The distance between the generations are apparent, and handled realistically but also with social comment. If you get a chance to see the play, don't miss it! If you can't see it, read the play slowly, there are multiple layers of beauty woven into this Pulitzer Prize-winning play. The course language and adult themes are not for the feint of heart, and it is not appropriate for children or (IMHO) kids under 14.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I did not review before ordering. Did not realize it was a play. A waste of money for me. Very disapointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tracy Letts' 2008 Pulitzer Prize-winning play is a triumph, and one that certainly stands with O'Neill, Williams, and Albee for its relentless and unflinching treatment of family secrets, resentments, & retaliations. The dialogue is brilliant and the biting humor is not to be missed. This is an essential for lovers of theater and literature.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was expecting to read a book, not a play.
thedramagirl More than 1 year ago
Tracy Letts weaves a twisted tale, indeed. This black comedy (with a running time of 3 hr. 20 min) is quite possibly the best piece of dramatic literature I have ever read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Liked the content of the movie, however thought the ending was odd and abrupt. Wanted to purchase the book, so glad I read reviews first, and find its not a novel but formatted as a play. Will not purchase for this reason.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Didn't know it was written in play form. The characters were a bunch of oddballs but that's what most families are made up of!
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This is a recent play with very interesting characters to play with for Michael Chekhov work. There are many great monologues in it as well. It is indeed a dramatic play with comedic elements. It can be scary admitting you know people like the characters in this play.
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Did not know this was in playwright format so read the first 5 pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When i read it as i think of a book but the play turn into the movie as i ead the play ad i read like a movie and get a picture in yor mind