Aunt Lucy Went to Buy a Hat

Aunt Lucy Went to Buy a Hat

by Alice Low, Laura Huliska-Beith
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Oh no, Aunt Lucy a hat not a cat!

Scatterbrained Aunt Lucy loses her hat and sets off to buy a new one. But it's easy to get sidetracked by all those marvelous shops!

Children will soak up the delicious details of this imaginative townscape — and spot Aunt Lucy's missing hat on every spread. Filled with clever

…  See more details below

Overview

Oh no, Aunt Lucy a hat not a cat!

Scatterbrained Aunt Lucy loses her hat and sets off to buy a new one. But it's easy to get sidetracked by all those marvelous shops!

Children will soak up the delicious details of this imaginative townscape — and spot Aunt Lucy's missing hat on every spread. Filled with clever wordplay, this comical escapade will delight any reader who loves memorable characters, a happy ending, and the fun of a rollicking rhyme.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Ditzy Aunt Lucy thinks she has lost her summery blue hat, even though it dangles down her back by its purple-ribbon ties. As the hat slips loose, Huliska-Beith (The Recess Queen) introduces a helpful red bird, who attempts to return it. But the spacey Aunt strides off in search of "a hat wide brimmed/ and trimmed with lace/ to keep the sunshine/ off her face." Instead, she gets something that rhymes with it: a cat. For her new pet, the woman shops for "some milk./ .../ Milk in a cup/ for lapping up.../ Instead she bought red silk." Silk needs "thread," so she buys a "bed," and so on. Meanwhile, the red bird waves the original chapeau in Aunt Lucy's general direction, and a gust of wind delivers the hat to the pet black cat; regrettably, the attentive bird disappears from the story and the cat takes all the credit. Huliska-Beith characterizes Aunt Lucy as a gangly, retro-chic woman with a swooshy beehive hairdo, oversize plastic glasses, an A-line sixties dress and pointy mules. Low (The Witch Who Was Afraid of Witches) plays with sound-alike words and emphasizes the protagonist's hyper-distractible personality. In the end, even the impulse purchases come in handy (Aunt Lucy and her cat take a nap on the new bed), and the stylish swoops of paint and skewed paper collages capture this book's benign carelessness. The content is as airy as Aunt Lucy herself, but the rhyming game provides a pleasing diversion. Ages 3-8. (Feb.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Aunt Lucy has lost her hat, but alert readers will be able to spot its progress through the town as this absent-minded lady with the beehive hairdo goes shopping for a new one. Passing a myriad of shops along the way, Aunt Lucy buys a cat (blue) instead of a hat, silk (red) instead of milk, and a bed instead of thread. Huliska-Beith splashes and curls her paintings across the pages, adding bits of fabric and paper for interest, providing plenty of details to catch the eye as the action bounces along. In the end, the lively feline brings back Aunt Lucy's hat (trimmed with real lace) before they collapse onto the bed, exhausted from the shopping spree. Assuming that pre-schoolers find shopping at all interesting and that parents do not object to the premise that it's a delightful activity for children, author Low (The Witch Who Was Afraid of Witches) has given young readers a peek into some colorful boutiques as well as a chance to play with some rhyming words and enjoy a romp with an exuberant and energetic Lucy (she carries the bed home by herself) and a charming blue cat. Although this rather frantic picture book will work as a read-aloud, browsing or reading one-on-one can better appreciate the many tiny details. 2004, HarperCollins, Ages 3 to 7.
—Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-In this rhyming tale, ditzy Aunt Lucy madly searches for her new blue hat, which readers will immediately notice is tied around her neck and hanging against her back. As she heads out the door to buy a new one, the bonnet is blown away by the wind. After trying to get the woman's attention, a red bird carries it along as Aunt Lucy visits shops all over town. She is easily distracted by things that rhyme with whatever item she is looking for. So, instead of a hat, she gets a cat. Instead of milk, she picks up some silk, and so on. When she finally comes out of her daze long enough to remember why she went out in the first place, her new cat rescues the very hat she lost at the beginning of the book. The text, which has a wonderful singsong quality, reads aloud well. Children will love the hilarious and wacky collage illustrations that add many details to the narrative. "Now who'd imagine/All of that/From going out/To buy a hat?" This romp would be a fine choice to top off Esphyr Slobodkina's Caps for Sale (HarperCollins, 1947) and Ezra Jack Keats's Jennie's Hat (Viking, 2003) in a storytime about headgear.-Bina Williams, Bridgeport Public Library, CT Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Poster Lady for the easily sidetracked, Aunt Lucy, thinking her brand-new blue one has gone missing (it's actually hanging from its ribbon down her back), goes out to buy a hat and comes back with a cat, goes out for milk (for the cat, silly) and returns with silk, seeks thread but finds a bed, and so on. Finally, her new pet sees her supposedly lost old hat blow by, and fetches it back-behavior more likely for a dog, to be sure, but call it poetic license. Huliska-Beith gives Aunt Lucy a tall beehive and purple-rimmed glasses, placing her, along with scatters of domestic bric-a-brac and tippy buildings, against flattened planes of color, for a postmodern look. It's a droll bit of nonsense that should draw a chuckle from Old Mother Hubbard fans. (Picture book. 6-8)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060089719
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/20/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 9.22(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Alice Low is the author of the New York Times best-seller The Witch Who Was Afraid of Witches, a book that has been adapted into a musical and a short animated film. She has also edited several anthologies and written many children's books and poems. Alice Low lives in Briarcliff Manor, New York.

Laura Huliska-Beith is the illustrator of Aunt Lucy Went to Buy a Hat by Alice Low, Ten Little Ladybugs by Melanie Gerth, and Violet's Music by Angela Johnson. She thinks that the world is a safer place since she decided not to become a bus driver in Kansas City, Missouri, where she lives with her husband, Jeff.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >