Aunt Nancy and Cousin Lazybones

Aunt Nancy and Cousin Lazybones

by Phyllis Root, David Parkins
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Root and Parkins (Aunt Nancy and Old Man Trouble) have created another original tall tale that sounds as though it's been told for years. When no-nonsense Aunt Nancy and her cat Ezekiel receive a visit from Cousin Lazybones, they know they're in for a hard time, but "family was family, so what could she do?" Aunt Nancy starts right in trying toSee more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

Root and Parkins (Aunt Nancy and Old Man Trouble) have created another original tall tale that sounds as though it's been told for years. When no-nonsense Aunt Nancy and her cat Ezekiel receive a visit from Cousin Lazybones, they know they're in for a hard time, but "family was family, so what could she do?" Aunt Nancy starts right in trying to get Cousin Lazybones to help out, but he keeps politely coming up with reasons to wait a bit or to do the chores some other way—each time creating more work for poor Aunt Nancy. When he is asked to do the dishes, he decides the plates are only half dirty, and turns them over, clean side up, for the next meal.

"Now ain't that an idea?" says Aunt Nancy. "Why didn't I think of that? Course, I don't know what we're gonna do when both sides is dirty."

"Reckon then it'll be your turn to wash,' says Cousin Lazybones."

Of course, trickster Aunt Nancy manages to beat Lazybones at his own game without breaking the rules of etiquette. Peppered with homespun, Midwestern colloquialisms and rhythmic repetitions, Root's text begs to be read aloud. Parkins's paintings show small, wiry Aunt Nancy and big, bleary Cousin Lazybones with humorously exaggerated but realistically recognizable facial expressions. The illustrator's palette is clean and well lit, with a strong sun shining over rolling hills into the rough-hewn but spotless cabin.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The heroine from this duo's earlier Aunt Nancy and Old Man Trouble (see Reprints below) returns to outwit a do-nothing relative in this spunky tale. Aunt Nancy dreads a visit from Cousin Lazybones, who is sloth personified. But "family was family, so what could she do?" Aunt Nancy never expected, however, the depths of Cousin Lazybones's flaw. His idea of washing the dishes is to turn dirty plates over to use the other side; he fetches water by setting a pail outdoors and waiting for rain. And even this minimal activity leaves the oaf physically spent. Aunt Nancy decides that "Family is family. But enough is enough" and to Cousin Lazybones's dismay, she comes down with a case of laziness herself. With all the chores left in his lap, Cousin Lazybones flees in horror. Root brings generous dollops of humor and homespun flavor to her folktale, carefully setting up Cousin Lazybones for a fall. Though the dialect is a bit uneven (in a few places, grammar is needlessly incorrect), the countrified idioms provide lots of flair. Parkins alternates shadowy full-color oils with spots of black-and-white silhouette art for a visually satisfying effect. His Cousin Lazybones is an unkempt bumbling giant of a man, the antithesis of diminutive Aunt Nancy in her tight coif and apron. Ages 5-8. (Oct.)
Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
Everyone reading this hoot of a tale knows a Cousin Lazybones. If you're really lucky, you also know an Aunt Nancy. This sprightly original story in down-home folk tradition is so crisply told that you can practically hear the storyteller's voice. So if you've got young 'uns with a hitch in their git-alongs, one read of this book should get them whooping and hollering and turning cartwheels right along with Aunt N herself. Parkins enhances the tale with his warm, funny oil paintings. It's sure to tickle the funny bones of the adult reader and young listener alike.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-Root and Parkins, who created Aunt Nancy and Old Man Trouble (Candlewick, 1996), pair up again to delight young readers with another original trickster tale. Cousin Lazybones, whose favorite occupation is sleeping, makes himself right at home-mostly in the rocking chair-during his (uninvited) visit to Aunt Nancy's. His answer to helping with the chores involves putting the water bucket outside the door until it rains and eating off of both sides of the plates before washing them. Aunt Nancy is no fool, however, and she outwits Cousin Lazybones. The next morning, she pretends that a "bone in her leg" makes it impossible for her to walk and lists all of the tasks that need to be done on this "spring-cleaning day," which quickly sets the lazy relative a-running. Aunt Nancy turns gleeful cartwheels in the yard after his departure. Most pages feature small silhouette illustrations accompanying the text; juxtaposed are full-color paintings styled with the kind of broad, exaggerated action that brings the story to life. The two characters, exuding expression, suit their parts to a T.-Barbara Elleman, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
Kirkus Reviews
Mountain humor abounds in this newly spun yarn by the pair that hatched Aunt Nancy and Old Man Trouble (1996). When Cousin Lazybones arrives, Aunt Nancy is hoping for help around the cabin, but all she gets is a pack of excuses and a heap of do-nothings. When asked to fetch water or find eggs, Cousin Lazybones complains of "a little hitch in my git-along," and parks himself in Aunt Nancy's favorite chair, sawing down acres of forest as he sleeps all day. Fed up to her bonnet with his shenanigans, Aunt Nancy invents her own ailment—a bone in her legs—that prevents her from fixing Cousin Lazybones any more meals. Aunt Nancy is a quick-witted, spry old woman, foiling the freeloading Cousin Lazybones in a side-splitting storyline and earning herself a vacation to boot. Root's homey narrative style is ripe to read aloud, and Parkins's kick-up-your-heels illustrations are reason enough to turn cartwheels. (Picture book. 4-8) .

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781564024251
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
10/07/1998
Edition description:
1st U.S. Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.44(w) x 12.13(h) x 0.32(d)
Lexile:
AD760L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >