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Auntee Edna
     

Auntee Edna

by Ethel Footman Smothers, Wil Clay (Illustrator)
 

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Tokee was having one of those days, her "wish I'd never been born" kind. How come she had to be cooped up here with old-fashioned Auntee Edna? Tokee was sure that Auntee Edna would be no fun -- she didn't even have a TV!

Soon, however, Tokee discovers that Auntee Edna has her own ways of having fun, ways from the past that are new to Tokee.

In this warm

Overview

Tokee was having one of those days, her "wish I'd never been born" kind. How come she had to be cooped up here with old-fashioned Auntee Edna? Tokee was sure that Auntee Edna would be no fun -- she didn't even have a TV!

Soon, however, Tokee discovers that Auntee Edna has her own ways of having fun, ways from the past that are new to Tokee.

In this warm story about kinship and family heritage, author Ethel Footman Smothers takes young readers back to earlier times when homemade teacakes were cut out with canning jars, when toys were created with simple sewing scraps, and when a pile of old buttons could hold wonderful stories. Illustrator Wil Clay's paintings charmingly capture Tokee's changing moods and her growing appreciation for "old-fashioned" Auntee Edna.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Tokee's mom decides it is time for her and her sister Reba to get to know their "people," and drops the two of them off to spend the night at old Auntee Edna's house. With youthful disdain, Tokee finds everything at Auntee Edna's "stale"—after all, she doesn't even own a television set. Her sister quickly finds a playmate down the street, leaving Tokee to mope. Auntee Edna entices Tokee into helping her make teacakes while she reminisces about her own girlhood. She shows Tokee a tin box filled with buttons that have their own "memories," with some dating back to the Civil War. She shows her how to make a toy with the buttons and scraps, and how to curl her hair with paper bags. Tokee begins to realize her Auntee Edna is not so "stale" after all. Gorgeous full-page paintings capture Tokee's expressions as she gradually begins to enjoy her visit with old-fashioned Auntee Edna. A wonderful tale of appreciating family heritage that all families will enjoy. 2001, Eerdmans Books, $16.00. Ages 5 to 12. Reviewer: Cheryl Peterson
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Tokee's overnight visit with her elderly Auntee Edna seems like an unsatisfactory way to "get to know your people," and she's sure she'll be bored. When her sister takes off with a neighbor, Tokee thinks that a "`wish I'd never been born' day" is inevitable. However, homemade treats, family stories, vintage crafts, and hair curling bridge the generation gap with radiant warmth. Clay's acrylics-on-canvas illustrations positively glow with superb detail, texture, and light. Each character in this African-American family is fully realized as the full-page contemporary pictures and miniature flashbacks grace the pages with a tangible realism. Author and illustrator combine their talents to create a fresh tribute to the beneficial bonding of young and old in a family or community. Reminiscent of Patricia Polacco's Thundercake (Philomel, 1990) and Rebecca C. Jones's Great Aunt Martha (Dutton, 1995; o.p.), Auntee Edna stands on her own. Young readers will wish they could reach out and pet her cat, catch a firefly or two, and taste the teacakes (recipe included), but they'll have to look to their own aunties. A wonderful read-aloud to share with a group or with a few listeners.-Jody McCoy, The Bush School, Seattle, WA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802852465
Publisher:
Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
Publication date:
01/15/2003
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
6.52(w) x 10.92(h) x 0.11(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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