Auntie Tiger by Laurence Yep, Insu Lee |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Auntie Tiger

Auntie Tiger

by Laurence Yep, Insu Lee
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Rumble, rumble.

Auntie Tiger's tummy is growling, and she is on the prowl for something very, very tasty.

Big Sister looks delicious.

Little Sister looks yummy, too.

But Auntie Tiger will have to be very tricky, because even though the sisters quarrel, they will do anything to protect each other.

Award-winning author Laurence Yep's deft

Overview

Rumble, rumble.

Auntie Tiger's tummy is growling, and she is on the prowl for something very, very tasty.

Big Sister looks delicious.

Little Sister looks yummy, too.

But Auntie Tiger will have to be very tricky, because even though the sisters quarrel, they will do anything to protect each other.

Award-winning author Laurence Yep's deft adaptation of a Chinese tiger version of "Little Red Riding Hood" has been illustrated in vibrant colors that pop off the page by newcomer Insu Lee. Auntie Tiger is sure to make you laugh—and make you hungry!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
In this version of a Chinese folktale with echoes of Little Red Riding Hood, a widow lives in the woods with her two daughters. The sisters argue constantly, since although Little Sister is sweet, she is also lazy. Big Sister ends up doing all the work and scolding her sister. One hot day, their mother must go to town for food. Because there is a Tiger on the prowl, she warns them not to open the door. Soon Tiger, disguised as an old woman, knocks and claims to be their Auntie. At first they do not fall for his tricks, but when he promises "a special treat," foolish Little Sister lets him in despite Big Sister's suspicions. Little Sister is soon swallowed. Big Sister cleverly outwits Tiger, however, and Little Sister has learned her lesson. Their mother is pleasantly surprised at their harmony when she returns. Lee sets the intensely colored visual tale in a lush forest of oddly variegated plants surrounding a rustic cabin. Mother and daughters are a bit cartoon-y, but appropriate for dealing with the more comic than frightening tiger whose grinning face fills the front of the jacket. The overall effect is humorous and not particularly Chinese in appearance. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3

In this retelling of "Little Red Riding Hood" set in China, two squabbling sisters are left alone while their mother goes shopping. A tiger in disguise pretends to be their Auntie; Big Sister is suspicious of his deep voice and his orange and black hands, but Little Sister lets him in. He offers a treat to the one who will fan him, so Little Sister pushes her sibling out of the room to get it for herself. The tiger eats her, but the older girl is able to trick him and save her sister. The children's rivalry is set aside as they tell their mother of their adventure. Bright, energetic illustrations done in jewel tones bring this story to life. The cunning tiger with his large head, bulging eyes, and small pointy teeth is scarcely contained in three of the spreads. Pair this story with Ed Young's Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China (Philomel, 1989), with its dark, menacing images, for an interesting storytime. This retelling will resonate with youngsters.-Mary Jean Smith, Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN

Kirkus Reviews
After telling her squabbling daughters not to let in strangers, Mother goes to the village, but what should appear but a smiling, kerchief-clad tiger pretending to be "Auntie"? Big Sister detects Auntie's tiger-like characteristics, but stubborn and lazy Little Sister foolishly believes that the visitor is bringing good things to eat and opens the door to the wily tiger, who eats her. Quick-thinking Big Sister devises an ingenious way to kill the tiger and rescue her younger sister, paving the way to the usual happy ending. Lee's paintings depict a fantastic forest and interior scenes with details of rural Chinese dress and household furnishings, the human and animal characters displaying animated movements and cartoon-like expressions. The jacket flap notes that Yep has "adapted a Chinese tiger version" of "Little Red Riding Hood," but there are no substantive notes of the tale's provenance. The award-winning author's style adapts well to the brevity and pace of a traditional story, and this humorous take could well be a lead-in to the darker and far more intriguing Lon Po Po. (Picture book/folktale. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060295523
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
12/30/2008
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Laurence Yep is the acclaimed author of more than sixty books for young people and a winner of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award. His illustrious list of novels includes the Newbery Honor Books Dragonwings and Dragon's Gate; The Earth Dragon Awakes: The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, a Texas Bluebonnet Award nominee; and The Dragon's Child: A Story of Angel Island, which he cowrote with his niece, Dr. Kathleen S. Yep, and was named a New York Public Library's "One Hundred Titles for Reading and Sharing" and a Bank Street College of Education Best Children's Book.

Mr. Yep grew up in San Francisco, where he was born. He attended Marquette University, graduated from the University of California at Santa Cruz, and received his PhD from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He lives in Pacific Grove, California, with his wife, the writer Joanne Ryder.

As a child, Insu Lee spent summer vacations with his sister in the Korean countryside. His memories of their shenanigans were an inspiration for the illustrations in Auntie Tiger. Insu Lee attended Hongik University in Seoul, Korea, and received his graduate degree from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. He resides in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where he is illustrating his next children's book.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >