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Auschwitz Report
     

Auschwitz Report

by Primo Levi, Leonardo De Benedetti, Robert S.C. Gordon (Editor), Judith Woolf (Translator)
 

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While in a Russian-administered holding camp in Katowice, Poland, in 1945, Primo Levi was asked to provide a report on living conditions in Auschwitz. Published the following year, it was then forgotten, and has until now remained unknown to a wider public.

Dating from the weeks and months immediately after the war, Auschwitz Report represents a

Overview

While in a Russian-administered holding camp in Katowice, Poland, in 1945, Primo Levi was asked to provide a report on living conditions in Auschwitz. Published the following year, it was then forgotten, and has until now remained unknown to a wider public.

Dating from the weeks and months immediately after the war, Auschwitz Report represents a fascinating and unusual return to the very earliest phase of Holocaust testimony. It details the author’s deportation to Auschwitz, selections for work and extermination, everyday life in the camp, and the organization and working of the gas chambers. It constitutes Levi’s first, astonishingly lucid attempts to come to terms with the raw horror of events that would drive him to create some of the greatest works of twentieth-century literature and testimony. Auschwitz Report is a major literary and historical discovery.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“One of the most important and gifted writers of our time.”—Italo Calvino
Italo Calvino
“One of the most important and gifted writers of our time.”
Elie Wiesel
It embarrasses me to say so, but it's not Levi's best work. It has neither the breath nor the breadth of Survival in Auschwitz or The Reawakening. But it was his first. And that is its strength and importance…In sober, precise language, without resorting to reverie or philosophical meditation, they describe the atmosphere in the railcar, the chaotic arrival, the selections, the separation of families…the transfer to Auschwitz III, a satellite of the death camp compound also known as Buna-Monowitz…the showers, the searches, the daily rations, the hunger, fear, disease…and then, the liberation by the Red Army…All without a superfluous word. In its very dryness, the book delivers a quasi-scientific report.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
First published in Italy in 1946, this newly rediscovered early work by the celebrated late author of such Holocaust memoirs as Survival in Auschwitz-an eyewitness account of conditions at Buna-Monowitz, a satellite camp of Auschwitz-appears in English for the first time. The short report was written for the Russian authorities who had liberated the camp and were gathering information on German war crimes. While the report is not exactly a curiosity-one of the first written by eyewitnesses, it has an important place in Holocaust historiography-it contains little new information. Some of what it does contain-for instance, the authors thought the Sonderkommandos were criminal inmates rather than Jews-we now know to be inaccurate. Despite this, the publication of the document gives readers, and especially Holocaust scholars, new insights into Levi's work. An excellent introduction by editor Gordon gives an astute overview of the stylistic and historical relationship between this work and Levi's later autobiographical writings. Levi's training as a chemist and his friend and fellow survivor De Benedetti's training as a physician bring to the piece a dispassionate tone that has, in a sense, prefigured the best writing about the Holocaust. This is an important addition to Holocaust literature, but probably of limited interest to the general reader. (Oct.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
In 1944, Primo Levi was one of several hundred Italian Jews transported to Aushwitz. After the liberation of the concentration camp by the Soviet army, Levi and De Benedetti, a fellow survivor, were asked by their liberators to write a report about the camp. Levi was trained as a scientist; De Benedetti, a physician. Their report appeared slightly edited in an Italian medical journal in 1946 but has been mostly lost to history, not even mentioned in Ian Thomson's magisterial biography Primo Levi: A Life. The authors relate with great economy the basic depredations of concentration camp life that are now so well known yet all the same stunning each time we read them. No, there is nothing new here Levi later expanded on his observations many times over, while De Benedetti apparently never wrote again but returned happily to practicing medicine. But the report's sting and historical significance there is an introduction by Robert S.C. Gordon (Italian, Caius Coll., Cambridge) mean that it belongs in most academic and public libraries. Scott H. Silverman, Bryn Mawr Coll. Lib., PA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781844670925
Publisher:
Verso Books
Publication date:
10/19/2006
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.57(w) x 7.76(h) x 0.58(d)

Meet the Author

A chemist by training, Primo Levi (1919–1987) was arrested as an anti-fascist partisan during World War II, and deported to Auschwitz in 1944. His books include The Drowned and the Saved, If This Is a Man and The Periodic Table. He died in 1987. Norton will publish The Complete Works of Primo Levi in 2010.

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