Austria, Prussia and The Making of Germany: 1806-1871 [NOOK Book]

Overview

It is often argued that the unification of Germany in 1871 was the inevitable result of the convergence of Prussian power and German nationalism.  John Breuilly here shows that the true story was much more complex.  For most of the nineteenth century Austria was the dominant power in the region.  Prussian-led unification was highly unlikely up until the 1860s and even then was only possible because of the many other changes happening in Germany, Europe and the ...

See more details below
Austria, Prussia and The Making of Germany: 1806-1871

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$27.71
BN.com price
(Save 25%)$36.95 List Price

Overview

It is often argued that the unification of Germany in 1871 was the inevitable result of the convergence of Prussian power and German nationalism.  John Breuilly here shows that the true story was much more complex.  For most of the nineteenth century Austria was the dominant power in the region.  Prussian-led unification was highly unlikely up until the 1860s and even then was only possible because of the many other changes happening in Germany, Europe and the wider world.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781317860747
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 6/11/2014
  • Series: Seminar Studies
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,306,152
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

John Breuilly is Professor of Nationalism and Ethnicity at the London School of Economics. His other publications in this field include The Formation of the First German Nation-State (1996) and, with Ronald Speirs (eds), Germany’s Two Unifications: Anticipations, Experiences, Responses (2004). He is currently editing The Oxford Handbook of the History of Nationalism.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Part One: Analysis. 1 Introduction. 2 From defeat to triumph, 1806-1815. 3 Cooperative Domination, 1815-48. 4 Austria and Prussia lose control, 1848-1849. 5 Counter-revolution, Cooperation and Conflict, 1849-1858. 6 From Cooperation to War, 1858-1866. 7 The Definitive Exclusion of Austria from Germany, 1867-1871. 8 Comparing Austria and Prussia. 9 Conclusion. Part Two: Documents. 1 End of Empire and formation of Rheinbund. 2 Peace of Tilsit between France and Prussia, 9 July 1807. 3 ‘A good revolution’: Hardenberg’s Riga Memorandum. 4 Peace of Schönbrunn between France and Austria, 14 October 1809. 5 Stein to Count Münster, 1 December 1812. 6 Convention of Tauroggen, 30 December 1812. 7 Ernst Moritz Arndt: ‘To the Prussians!’, January 1813. 8 Prussian introduction of universal conscription. 9 Frederick William III: ‘An Mein Volk’, 17 March 1813. 10 Kalisch Declaration of March 1813. 11 Metternich’s interview with Napoleon, Dresden, 16 June 1813. 12 Military forces at the Battle of Leipzig, October 1813. 13 Frederick William III promises a constitution, 22 May 1815. 14 German Confederal Act, 8 June 1815. 15 Vienna Final Act, 15 May 1820. 16 Petition for a single customs system, April 1819. 17 Customs union agreement between Prussia and the Grand Duchy of Hesse, February 1828. 18 Memorandum of Prussian Finance Minister Friedrich von Motz, 1829. 19 Metternich’s reaction to Prussian customs union policy, June 1831. 20 Prussia extends its influence through customs agreements, November 1831. 21 Paul Pfizer: On the aims and tasks of German liberalism, Tübingen, 1832. 22 Metternich’s response to the Hambach Festival, June 1832. 23 Austria and Prussia agree on repressive measures in Germany, August 1833. 24 Assessment of forward Prussian policy in Germany, June 1836. 25 Responses to the crisis with France, November 1840. 26 Popular song from the Rhine crisis of 1840. 27 Austrian fear of rising Prussian influence in Germany. 28 Radowitz’s memorandum on measures to be taken by the German Confederation, November 1847. 29 Offenburg programme of south-west German democrats, 10 September 1847. 30 Heppenheimer programme of the south-west German liberals, 10 October 1847. 31 Typical example of demands at the outset of revolution. 32 Blum and Jordan expressing different views on the Posen issue. 33 Creation of a provisional German authority. 34 Declaration by Heinrich von Gagern, 18 December 1848. 35 Reply by the Austrian Prime Minister, Prince Schwarzenberg, 28 December 1848. 36 Prussian circular to its envoys at the seats of the German governments, 23 January 1849. 37 Despatch from Schwarzenberg to Schmerling at the Reich Authority, 4 February 1849. 38 Extracts from the Imperial Constitution of March 1849. 39 Austrian Proposal concerning the Reich government, 8 March 1849. 40 Final Prussian rejection of the Imperial Constitution, 28 April 1849. 41 Erfurt Constitution, 28 May 1849. 42 Agreement between Bavaria, Saxony and Württemberg on the main principles for a revision of the confederal constitution, 27 February 1850. 43 Olmütz agreement between Austria and Prussia, 29 November 1850. 44 Bismarck’s speech to the Prussian Landtag on the Olmütz agreement, 3 December 1850. 45 Austrian idea of a central European Customs Union, June 1850. 46 Prussian hostility to Austria’s Customs Union plan. 47 Bismarck considers Austro-Prussian relations, 1856. 48 Austrian fears of a Prussian alliance with liberal nationalism, October 1859. 49 For or against Austria? Policy disputes in Berlin, March 1860. 50 Beust’s memorandum on Federal Reform, 15 October 1861. 51 Frankfurt Reform Act, 1 September 1863. 52 Response of the Prussian government to the Frankfurt Reform Act, 15 September 1863. 53 Resolution of Nationalverein on the Frankfurt Reform Act, 16 October 1863. 54 Resolution of Reform Verein on the Frankfurt Reform Acts, 28 October 1863. 55 Report of Rechberg to Franz Joseph, May 1864. 56 Bismarck to Werther (Vienna), 6 August 1864. 57 Gastein Convention between Austria and Prussia, 14 August 1865. 58 Austrian Manifesto of War, Emperor Franz Joseph, 17 June 1866. 59 Prussian Manifesto of War, King William, 18 June 1866. 60 Preliminary Peace of Nikolsburg, 26 July 1866. 61 King William addresses the legislature in Berlin after the victory over Austria, 5 August 1866. Guide to further reading. Bibliography. Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)