Authorial Ethics: How Writers Abuse Their Calling

Overview

Authorial Ethics is a normative study that deals with the many ways in which writers abuse their commitment to truth and integrity. It is divided by academic discipline and includes chapters on journalism, history, literature, art, psychology, and science, among others. Robert Hauptman offers generalizations and theoretical remarks exemplified by specific cases. Two major abrogations are inadvertent error and purposeful misconduct, which is subdivided into falsification, fabrication, and plagiarism. All of these ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$26.99
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$29.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $26.72   
  • New (5) from $26.72   
  • Used (1) from $33.64   
Authorial Ethics: How Writers Abuse Their Calling

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$45.99
BN.com price
(Save 42%)$79.99 List Price

Overview

Authorial Ethics is a normative study that deals with the many ways in which writers abuse their commitment to truth and integrity. It is divided by academic discipline and includes chapters on journalism, history, literature, art, psychology, and science, among others. Robert Hauptman offers generalizations and theoretical remarks exemplified by specific cases. Two major abrogations are inadvertent error and purposeful misconduct, which is subdivided into falsification, fabrication, and plagiarism. All of these problems appear in most disciplines, although their negative impact is felt most potently in biomedical research and publication. Professor Mary Lefkowitz, the classicist, provides an incisive foreword.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Times Higher Education Supplement
Introduced with a foreword by eminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz, Authorial Ethics is a normative study that considers the many ways in which writers abuse their commitment to truth and integrity. In case studies divided by academic discipline, it trains a particular focus on literature, journalism and art. Robert Hauptman argues that two major abrogations by authors are inadvertent error and purposeful misconduct.
Choice
Hauptman (ret., St. Cloud State Univ.) considers what makes authors spurn "convention, mores, rule and law" in their pursuit of publication. Rather than delivering just a compilation of cases, Hauptman provides a broader study of the ethical issues writers face. His argument goes beyond the predictable discussion on plagiarism to confront such ethical issues as factual errors, unclear representation of purpose, and ghostwriting for clinical pharmaceutical studies. Hauptman's background as a librarian—applied in his earlier works Ethical Challenges in Librarianship (1988), Ethics and Librarianship (2002), and Documentation: A History and Critique of Attribution, Commentary, Glosses, Marginalia, Notes, Bibliographies, Works-Cited Lists, and Citation Indexing and Analysis (2008)—prepares him for objective consideration of authorial controversies in all disciplines. He divides his discussion of these matters into four sections: "The Humanities" (by far the longest of the four), "The Social Sciences," "The Sciences," and "Other Areas" (the last covers business, economics, and law). This book's broad perspective makes it relevant to writers in all fields. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; professionals.
Marcel Chotkowski LaFollette
With abundant lessons drawn from a rogues’ gallery of those who lied, cheated, and stole their way into undeserved credit or publication, Robert Hauptman's thoughtful and wide-ranging Authorial Ethics should be required reading for every writer in every field.
Elizabeth Buchanan
Authorial Ethics is ground-breaking, a fascinating examination of the many complex and multifaceted issues in authorship, across disciplines and professions. The fundamental principles represented throughout impact all of us, as writers, scholars, producers, and consumers of texts: Honesty, truth, integrity, justice, responsibility, accountability, beneficence, a sense of fair play, balance, and tolerance must return to the foreground of our attention. Hauptman has once again proven his intellectual rigor, calling our attention to the meta-ethical, meta-rhetorical intricacies of our craft. In an age of 'responsible conduct of research' awareness, Authorial Ethics is a must read.
CHOICE
Hauptman (ret., St. Cloud State Univ.) considers what makes authors spurn 'convention, mores, rule and law' in their pursuit of publication. Rather than delivering just a compilation of cases, Hauptman provides a broader study of the ethical issues writers face. His argument goes beyond the predictable discussion on plagiarism to confront such ethical issues as factual errors, unclear representation of purpose, and ghostwriting for clinical pharmaceutical studies. Hauptman's background as a librarian—applied in his earlier works Ethical Challenges in Librarianship (1988), Ethics and Librarianship (2002), and Documentation: A History and Critique of Attribution, Commentary, Glosses, Marginalia, Notes, Bibliographies, Works-Cited Lists, and Citation Indexing and Analysis (2008)—prepares him for objective consideration of authorial controversies in all disciplines. He divides his discussion of these matters into four sections: 'The Humanities' (by far the longest of the four), 'The Social Sciences,' 'The Sciences,' and 'Other Areas' (the last covers business, economics, and law). This book's broad perspective makes it relevant to writers in all fields. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; professionals.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739185971
  • Publisher: Lexington Books
  • Publication date: 8/28/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 201
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Hauptman is a retired reference librarian and retired professor of Learning Resources & Technology Services, Education, and Information Media at St. Cloud State University. He is founding editor of Journal of Information Ethics and author of The Mountain Encyclopedia, among other books.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword Mary Lefkowitz vii

Preface ix

Preliminaries

1 Introduction 1

The Humanities

2 Journalism 21

3 History 33

4 Life Writing 51

5 Literature 63

6 Art 79

The Social Sciences

7 Psychology and Sociology 99

8 Anthropology 113

The Sciences

9 Physics and Biomedicine 125

Other Areas

10 Business and Economics 145

11 Law 153

Extrapolation

12 A Concise Theory of Authorial Ethics 167

13 Concluding Remarks 169

References 175

Index 191

About the Author 201

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)