Auto/Biography And Identity

Overview

This groundbreaking book shows how female performers have used autobiography and performance as both a means of expression and control of their private and public selves, the "face and the mask". It looks at how actors, managers, writers and live artists have done this on the page and on the stage from the late eighteenth-century to the present day, testing the boundaries between gender, theatre and autobiographical form. This book facilitates connections?between texts and performances, past and present ...

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Overview

This groundbreaking book shows how female performers have used autobiography and performance as both a means of expression and control of their private and public selves, the "face and the mask". It looks at how actors, managers, writers and live artists have done this on the page and on the stage from the late eighteenth-century to the present day, testing the boundaries between gender, theatre and autobiographical form. This book facilitates connections—between texts and performances, past and present practitioners, professional and private selves, individuals and communities—all of which have in some way renegotiated identity through autobiography and the creative act.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780719063336
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • Publication date: 5/21/2009
  • Series: Women, Theatre and Performance Series
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Maggie B. Gale is Reader in Drama and Theatre Arts at the University of Birmingham.

Viv Gardner is Professor of Theatre Studies in the Department of Drama at the University of Manchester.

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Table of Contents

Part 1: Telling tales: Autobiographic strategies
• The three nobodies: Autobiographical strategies in the work of Alma Ellerslie, Kitty Marion and Ina Rozant—Viv Gardner
• The disappearing subject in Susan Glaspell's auto/biographical theatre—Nicola Shaugnessy
• Imag(in)ing a life: Adrienne Kennedy's 'People Who Led to My Plays' and 'Deadly Triplets'—Elaine Aston
• Part 2: The professional/confessional self
• The way to the world: Emma Robinson and the dilemmas of identity—Susan Croft
• Lena Ashwell and auto/biographical negotiations of the professional self—Maggie B. Gale
• Tilly Wedekind and Lulu: The role of her life or the role in her life?—Bella Merlin
• Troubling identities: Claire Dowie's 'Why is John Lennon Wearing a Skirt?'—Gabriele Griffin
• Part 3: Auto/biography. Identity and performance
• Latina theatre and performance: Acts of exposure—Caridad Svich
• Being her: presence, absence and performance in the art of Janet Cardiff and Tracy Emin—Jen Harvie
• Peforming lesbians: Constructing the self, constructing the community—Dee Heddon
• Re(ci)petoires of the self: Autobiographical aspects of Bobby Baker's performance works. Bobby Baker interview—Catharine Maclean Hopkins

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