The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth by Andrew Carnegie, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth

The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth

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by Andrew Carnegie
     
 

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The enlightening memoir of the industrialist as famous for his philanthropy as for his fortune.

His good friend Mark Twain dubbed him “St. Andrew.” British Prime Minister William Gladstone called him an “example” for the wealthy. Such terms seldom apply to multimillionaires. But Andrew Carnegie was no run-of-the-mill steel

Overview

The enlightening memoir of the industrialist as famous for his philanthropy as for his fortune.

His good friend Mark Twain dubbed him “St. Andrew.” British Prime Minister William Gladstone called him an “example” for the wealthy. Such terms seldom apply to multimillionaires. But Andrew Carnegie was no run-of-the-mill steel magnate. At age thirteen and full of dreams, he sailed from his native Dunfermline, Scotland, to America. The story of his success begins with a $1.20-a-week job at a bobbin factory. By the end of his life, he had amassed an unprecedented fortune—and given away more than ninety percent of it for the good of mankind.

Here, for the first time in one volume, are two impressive works by Andrew Carnegie himself: his autobiography and “The Gospel of Wealth,” a groundbreaking manifesto on the duty of the wealthy to give back to society all of their fortunes. And he practiced what he preached, erecting sixteen hundred libraries across the country, founding Carnegie Mellon University, building Carnegie Hall, and performing countless other acts of philanthropy because, as Carnegie wrote, “The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.”

With an Introduction by Gordon Hutner

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101098370
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/07/2006
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
364,855
File size:
459 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author



Andrew Carnegie was born on November 25, 1835, in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, son of a hand loom weaver. In 1848, the family emigrated to the U.S. and settled in Pennsylvania. Carnegie found work in various industries such as telegraphy and the railroad industry, which later proved to be wise decisions. After Carnegie and partner John Pierpont Morgan invested in the steel mills in the 1880s, he became the second-richest person in the world, behind only John D. Rockefeller. Andrew Carnegie spent his last years as a philanthropist, providing the capital for purposes of public interest and social and educational advancement, establishing more than sixteen hundred libraries in the U.S. alone. Carnegie disseminated his riches to public foundations, hospitals, and schools throughout the world, and he even owned Carnegie Hall in New York City from its construction in 1890 until his widow sold it in 1924. In his lifetime, Carnegie gave away more than $350 million. After his death, his last $30 million was also given away to foundations, charities, and pensioners.

 

Gordon Hutner is a professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is founder and editor of the Oxford University Press journal American Literary History. Among his books are What America Read: Taste, Class, and the Novel, 1920–1960; American Literature, American Culture; The American Literary History Reader; and Selected Speeches and Writings of Theodore Roosevelt.




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The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Ty_Hampshiro More than 1 year ago
This is a great book. It tells about Andrew Carnegie's childhood in Scottland, his immigration to America, and his rise to industrial power. This probably one of the most amazing rags to riches story that I have ever read. Carnegie's story proves that anyone can reach the top if they put everything they have twords it.
alexphilAU More than 1 year ago
The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie is a beautiful book by itself. It is a clear timeline of his life and times. A boy who's father is a weaver coming from a poor Scottish family. This is a story of a boy who made it to the richness of his own labor. A boy who became an iron magnate in the United States and donated two thousand libraries or so I n his lifetime. Ndrew Carnegie is one of the very few men of his kind in this century who worked hard so that others or everybody might enjoy the fruits of his labor. I am recommending this book to all biography lovers!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In addition to the flowery writing of the day, Mr. Carnegie's overblown sense of self importance makes this virtually unreadable. While his ego no doubt served him well in his lifetime, a biography of Andrew Carnegie, written by an impartial author, is what I am now seeking.
Ken_Can_76 More than 1 year ago
I was actually pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed the book and learned from it. Andrew Carnegie was a very good writer and did an ok job with the book. There were some sections which had a bit too much self boasting about donating millions to one charity or another or having the ear of one politician or another and singlehandedly convincing them on a course of action which assuredly avoided a global catastrophe... just listing them down almost in an attempt to garner admiration from readers. But overall, it was informative and a pretty good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago