The Autobiography of Medgar Evers: A Hero's Life and Legacy Revealed Through His Writings, Letters, and Speeches

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Overview

The Autobiography of Medgar Evers is the first and only comprehensive collection of the words of slain civil rights hero Medgar Evers. Evers became a leader of the civil rights movement during the late 1950s and early 1960s. He established NAACP chapters throughout the Mississippi delta region, and eventually became the NAACP’s first field secretary in Mississippi. Myrlie Evers-Williams, Medgar’s widow, partnered with Manning Marable, one of the country’s leading black scholars, to develop this book based on the ...

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The Autobiography of Medgar Evers: A Hero's Life and Legacy Revealed Through His Writings, Letters, and Speeches

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Overview

The Autobiography of Medgar Evers is the first and only comprehensive collection of the words of slain civil rights hero Medgar Evers. Evers became a leader of the civil rights movement during the late 1950s and early 1960s. He established NAACP chapters throughout the Mississippi delta region, and eventually became the NAACP’s first field secretary in Mississippi. Myrlie Evers-Williams, Medgar’s widow, partnered with Manning Marable, one of the country’s leading black scholars, to develop this book based on the previously untouched cache of Medgar’s personal documents and writings. These writings range from Medgar’s monthly reports to the NAACP to his correspondence with luminaries of the time such as Robert Carter, General Counsel for the NAACP in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case. Still, most moving of all, is the preface written by Myrlie Evers.

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Editorial Reviews

KLIATT - KaaVonia Hinton
There is a major motion picture about him, a college named after him, and an institute dedicated to his legacy—but who was this man, Medgar Wiley Evers? What did he fight for? While his story still seems a bit incomplete, his transcribed conference calls, speeches, memos, and letters to and from some of the well-known figures of the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and 1960s contained in this valuable source do help to answer some basic questions about the field secretary of the Mississippi branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The footnotes offering short biographies of various people, such as James Meredith, Simeon Booker, Jackie Robinson, and Leontyne Price, mentioned in the over 85 documents in the book, coupled with bibliographical citations, are invaluable to researchers, teachers and students alike. Several b/w photos of Evers at work consoling a black girl badly beaten by police, escorting Lena Horne to a civil rights rally, and addressing a crowd at a desegregation rally, along with a photo of his blood-stained driver's license, indicate the magnitude of his commitment to the struggle for freedom and equality. Evers was brutally murdered in 1963, but his devotion to encouraging blacks to register to vote, protest, boycott, and resist oppression of all kinds helped propel citizens and lawmakers of Mississippi to demand a more equitable state and society.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780465021789
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 8/28/2006
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 947,607
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 5.70 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Meet the Author

Myrlie Evers-Williams is the widow of slain civil rights hero Medgar Evers and former chairwoman of the NAACP. She has continued the work of her late husband, and her tireless efforts to bring about social change have kept his memory alive. Myrlie Evers-Williams lives in Bend, Oregon. Manning Marable is Professor of History, Political Science, and Public Policy, at Columbia University. Marable lives in New York City.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2011

    Great story

    I enjoyed reading this book about Medgar Evers I didn't know that he was invovled with the civil rights movement. I learn alot of things about this book that made me a better person. What makes so bad is that he doesn't get the appreciation of the things that he has done for civil rights movement. I recommend this book for anyone who wants to learn about Medgar Evers and the things he accomplished in the civil rights movement. However, for black americans if you want to learn about our history it is up to us to teach ourselves.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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