Autobiography of Red

( 4 )

Overview

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR
National book Critics Circle Award Finalist  

"Anne Carson is, for me, the most exciting poet writing in English today."--Michael Ondaatje

"This book is amazing--I haven't discovered any writing in years so marvelously disturbing." --Alice Munro

            
The award-winning poet Anne Carson reinvents a genre in Autobiography of Red,...

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Autobiography of Red

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Overview

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR
National book Critics Circle Award Finalist  

"Anne Carson is, for me, the most exciting poet writing in English today."--Michael Ondaatje

"This book is amazing--I haven't discovered any writing in years so marvelously disturbing." --Alice Munro

            
The award-winning poet Anne Carson reinvents a genre in Autobiography of Red, a stunning work that is both a novel and a poem, both an unconventional re-creation of an ancient Greek myth and a wholly original coming-of-age story set in the present.

Geryon, a young boy who is also a winged red monster, reveals the volcanic terrain of his fragile, tormented soul in an autobiography he begins at the age of five. As he grows older, Geryon escapes his abusive brother and affectionate but ineffectual mother, finding solace behind the lens of his camera and in the arms of a young man named Herakles, a cavalier drifter who leaves him at the peak of infatuation. When Herakles reappears years later, Geryon confronts again the pain of his desire and embarks on a journey that will unleash his creative imagination to its fullest extent. By turns whimsical and haunting, erudite and accessible, richly layered and deceptively simple, Autobiography of Red is a profoundly moving portrait of an artist coming to terms with the fantastic accident of who he is.

"A profound love story . . . sensuous and funny, poignant, musical and tender."--The New York Times Book Review

"A deeply odd and immensely engaging book. . . . [Carson] exposes with passionate force the mythic underlying the explosive everyday."  --The Village Voice

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Editorial Reviews

Village Voice
A deeply odd and immensely engaging book. . . . [Carson] exposes with passionate force the mythic underlying the explosive everyday.
New York Times Book Review
A profound love story . . . sensuous and funny, poignant, musical and tender.
From the Publisher
"The most exciting poet writing in English today.... A rare    talent — brilliant and full of wit,passionate and also deeply moving."         - Michael Ondaatje

"A novel in the shape of a poem, a classical story made contemporary—wry, poignant, beautiful and occasionally erotic. Carson writes like an angel—Her passions recall that incandescent chronicler of love Elisabeth Smart [and] Malcolm Lowry—This romantic fable is—a rare (red) bird among Canadian novels—A wonderful book of dense, glittering prose poetry that is both timely and timeless."  - Katherine Govier, Time

"Amazing — I haven't discovered any writing in years so marvelously disturbing."  - Alice Munro

"Wildly imaginative and inventive—The first dozen pages will convince anyone—that Carson is an authentic and original talent."                   - Douglas Fetherling, The Ottawa Citizen

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375701290
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 7/28/1999
  • Series: Vintage Contemporaries Series
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 101,197
  • Product dimensions: 5.15 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.43 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne Carson lives in Canada.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Reading Group Guide

1. As an epigraph to the introduction, Carson quotes Gertrude Stein: "I like the feeling of words doing as they want to do and as they have to do" [p. 3], and goes on to say that she admires the way Stesichoros broke away from the conventional use of language: "Stesichoros released being" [p. 5]. Which passages of Carson's own writing in Autobiography of Red exemplify this ideal of unconventional language, unconventional perception, unconventional seeing?

2. Geryon, we are told, likes to plan his autobiography "in that blurred state between awake and asleep when too many intake valves are open in the soul" [p. 60]. As a child he has difficulty with the intensity and strangeness of his own perceptions. He suffers, but he also has powers that make him unique. Is there a connection between being a monster and being an artist? In what ways does Geryon's creativity manifest itself as his story proceeds?

3. How important to his story--he calls himself, at one point, "loveslave" [p. 55]-- is the relationship of Geryon's masculinity to his lovelorn state? How important is his homosexuality? What is the poem making clear about the relationship between desire and will? If you have read The Beauty of the Husband, how does Geryon's position compare to that of the wife?

4. Geryon's autobiography begins with "Total Facts Known About Geryon" [p. 37]. Carson takes these elements from Stesichoros, but she creates a different ending. Instead of being killed by Herakles, Geryon proves himself to be one of the Yazcamac, "People who saw the inside of the volcano. / And came back" [pp. 128-29]. Why does she alter the original story's plot?

5. How do the imagery and symbolism of the volcano work throughout the poem? How does the image of the volcano shed light on Geryon's problems with inside and outside, as well as his fear of entrapment or confinement? More specifically, how does the Emily Dickinson poem that appears on page 22 ("The reticent volcano keeps / His never slumbering plan") relate to chapter XLVI of Geryon's autobiography?

For discussion of the work of Anne Carson:

1. In "Essay on What I Think About Most" Carson writes that she admires Alkman's poem because of "the impression it gives / of blurting out the truth in spite of itself" [p. 34]. Does the plain declarative style of Carson's verse give the same impression? She further states that Alkman's simplicity "is a fake / Alkman is not simple at all, / he is a master contriver" [Men in the Off Hours, pp. 34-35]. Might the same be said of Carson herself? What is simple about her work? What aspects of her work are complex, difficult, even impossible to comprehend? Are her contrivances part of an effort to alienate, or rather to seduce, the reader?

2. How does the work of Anne Carson change a reader's expectations about poetry--about what poetry is, what poetry does, the emotional and intellectual effects of poetry upon a reader? Is she asking us--or forcing us--to reevaluate our aesthetic criteria?

3. In a strongly positive review, Calvin Bedient makes a comment on Carson's work that might be read as a qualification: "Her spare, short-sentence style is built for speed. Her generalizations flare, then go out. Nothing struggles up into a vision, a large hold on things. The poems are self-consuming."5 Poets working in more traditional forms, like the sonnet for instance, have tended to create poems that work through a process of thought and arrive at a new conclusion or perspective; they offer the reader what Robert Frost called "a momentary stay against confusion." How does Carson's work differ from more traditional forms of poetry? Is it troubling or is it liberating that she doesn't seem bound to conclusions, to consoling gestures toward the reader?

4. The biographical note for The Beauty of the Husband offers only the statement, "Anne Carson lives in Canada." While it is a general rule in poetry that the speaker of any given poem is not necessarily the author and is often an invented persona, does Carson's work lead you to certain assumptions about the facts of her life, her habits, her intellectual world, her losses, her griefs? Does her work have a deliberately confessional aspect--like that of Robert Lowell or Anne Sexton--or is it difficult to tell with Carson what has actually been experienced and what has been imagined? What issues, experiences, and concerns are repeated throughout her work?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2007

    Incredible!

    I read this book for the twelth time because it's such a unique book and it's powerful. Autobiography of Red will leave a deep impact on it's readers, the novel which is written in verse will take readers on for a thrill ride. While reading this book, I sometimes had trouble figuring which character was speaking since almost all dialogue was in italics. Nonetheless, this is an unforgettable book. You will love it! Autobiography of Red is a literary masterpiece!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 13, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful book.

    Wonderful book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2001

    Among the Newer Classics

    This is one of Carson's most marvellously disturbing pieces. Her red monster, Geryon is perfect. The book would not be complete without the philosophical introductory pieces on Steisichoros and Stein. Thought-provoking, inventive.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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