Automatic for the People

Automatic for the People

4.6 6
by R.E.M.
     
 

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OK, so they're not simply shiny, happy people, but then R.E.M. never really were. The quartet responded to the immense commercial success of 1991's OUT OF TIME (almost overnight by record industry standards) with this collection of poetically introspective songs. AUTOMATIC FOR THE PEOPLE followed its predecessor by a mere 18 months, but remarkably, the tone is vastly… See more details below

Overview

OK, so they're not simply shiny, happy people, but then R.E.M. never really were. The quartet responded to the immense commercial success of 1991's OUT OF TIME (almost overnight by record industry standards) with this collection of poetically introspective songs. AUTOMATIC FOR THE PEOPLE followed its predecessor by a mere 18 months, but remarkably, the tone is vastly different. Lush and serene where OUT OF TIME is lean and perky, AUTOMATIC FOR THE PEOPLE is in many ways a continuation of the "unplugged" tour that preceded its sessions. However, the arrangements are more precise and meticulous. "Drive" and "Man on the Moon" are major highlights, while "Everybody Hurts" quickly became a theme for headline variations everywhere. More than ever, this recording shows that R.E.M. could handle the pressures of superstardom with a minimum of obdurate insolence.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Turning away from the sweet pop of Out of Time, R.E.M. created a haunting, melancholy masterpiece with Automatic for the People. At its core, the album is a collection of folk songs about aging, death, and loss, but the music has a grand, epic sweep provided by layers of lush strings, interweaving acoustic instruments, and shimmering keyboards. Automatic for the People captures the group at a crossroads, as they moved from cult heroes to elder statesmen, and the album is a graceful transition into their new status. It is a reflective album, with frank discussions on mortality, but it is not a despairing record -- "Nightswimming," "Everybody Hurts," and "Sweetness Follows" have a comforting melancholy, while "Find the River" provides a positive sense of closure. R.E.M. have never been as emotionally direct as they are on Automatic for the People, nor have they ever created music quite as rich and timeless, and while the record is not an easy listen, it is the most rewarding record in their oeuvre.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/06/1992
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624505525
catalogNumber:
45055
Rank:
960

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

R.E.M.   Primary Artist
John Paul Jones   Performing Ensemble
Peter Buck   Guitar,Group Member
Knox Chandler   Cello
Patti Gouvas   Violin
George Hanson   Conductor
Reid Harris   Viola
Kathleen Kee   Cello
Daniel Lauter   Cello
Scott Litt   Harmonica,Contrabass Clarinet,Clavinet
Mike Mills   Bass
Elizabeth Murphy   Cello
Heidi Nitchie   Viola
Lonnie Ottzen   Violin
Sandy Salzinger   Violin
Michael Stipe   Vocals,Group Member
Sou-Chun Su   Violin
Judy Taylor   Violin
Deborah Workman   Oboe
Bill Berry   Drums
Denise Berginson-Smith   Violin
Lonnie Ditzen   Violin
Bertis Downs   Track Performer
Jefferson Holt   Track Performer
Jody Taylor   Violin
Paul Murphy   Leader,Viola
Daniel Laufer   Cello
Elizabeth Proctor Murphy   Cello

Technical Credits

Mark Howard   Engineer
Ed Brooks   Engineer
George Cowan   Engineer
John Keane   Engineer
Scott Litt   Producer
Stephen Marcussen   Mastering
Clif Norrell   Engineer
R.E.M.   Producer
Michael Stipe   Art Direction
Tom Recchion   Art Direction
Ted Malia   Engineer
Andrew Roshberg   Engineer

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