Avonmore

Avonmore

4.0 1
by Bryan Ferry
     
 
On the album art of Avonmore, the record he released when he was a year shy of 70, Bryan Ferry showcases himself as a dashing young man -- a portrait of an artist not as a glam trailblazer or distinguished elder statesman, but rather caught in an indeterminate time between the gorgeous heartbreak of Roxy Music's Avalon and the

Overview

On the album art of Avonmore, the record he released when he was a year shy of 70, Bryan Ferry showcases himself as a dashing young man -- a portrait of an artist not as a glam trailblazer or distinguished elder statesman, but rather caught in an indeterminate time between the gorgeous heartbreak of Roxy Music's Avalon and the meticulous solo work that came immediately in its wake. This is Ferry's prime, a moment when his legacy was intact but yet to be preserved in amber. Avonmore consciously evokes this distinct period, sometimes sighing into the exquisite ennui of Avalon but usually favoring the fine tailoring of Boys & Girls, a record where every sequenced rhythm, keyboard, and guitar line blended into an alluring urbane pulse. Ferry isn't so much racing to revive a younger edition of himself as much as laying claim to this particular strand of sophisticated pop, one that happens to feel a shade richer now when it's delivered by an artist whose world-weariness has settled into his marrow but is yet to sadden him. This much is apparent on Avonmore's closing covers, an oddly appropriate pairing of Stephen Sondheim's "Send in the Clowns" and Robert Palmer's "Johnny & Mary" that are both given gently meditative electronic makeovers, but much of the record explores the other end of the Ferry spectrum, where he's making music to dance away the heartache. He's no longer on the floor himself, preferring to watch with a bit of a bemusement, but this reserved romanticism suits him perfectly, particularly because Ferry and his co-producer Rhett Davies -- a steady collaborator since 1999's standards record As Time Goes By -- place an emphasis on mood but not at the expense of the songs. Naturally, what is first alluring about Avonmore is its feel -- it's meant to be seductive -- but the songs are what makes this record something more than a fling.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/17/2014
Label:
Bmg Rights Managemen
UPC:
0859381012153
catalogNumber:
81012153
Rank:
12561

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Bryan Ferry   Primary Artist,Piano,Keyboards
Steve Jones   Guitar
Chris Spedding   Guitar
Maceo Parker   Alto Saxophone
Nile Rodgers   Guitar
Ronnie Spector   Background Vocals
Flea   Bass
Neil Hubbard   Guitar
Neil Jason   Bass
Mark Knopfler   Guitar
Johnny Marr   Guitar
Marcus Miller   Bass
Andy Newmark   Drums
Guy Pratt   Bass
Frank Ricotti   Percussion
Jeff Thall   Guitar
Fonzi Thornton   Background Vocals
Enrico Tomasso   Trumpet
David Williams   Guitar
Colin Good   Piano
John Moody   Oboe
Iain Dixon   Saxophone
Robert Fowler   Saxophone
Hanne Hukkelberg   Background Vocals
Todd Terje   Synthesizer
Oliver Thompson   Guitar
Paul Turner   Bass
Laura Marin   Background Vocals
Paul Beard   Keyboards
Cherisse Osei   Percussion,Drums
Michelle John   Background Vocals
Hannah Khemoh   Background Vocals
Chris Lawrence   Double Bass
Jodie Scantlebury   Background Vocals
Bobbie Gordon   Background Vocals
Tara Ferry   Drums
Shar White   Background Vocals
Emily Panic   Background Vocals
Richard White   Saxophone,Alto Saxophone
Jacob Quistgaard   Guitar
Tom Wheatley   Double Bass
Sewuese Abwa   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Stephen Sondheim   Composer
Bryan Ferry   Composer,Producer,String Arrangements
Robert Palmer   Composer
Rhett Davies   Producer
Johnny Marr   Composer
Colin Good   String Arrangements
Johnson Somerset   Producer
Tim Roe   Engineer
Simon Willey   Engineer
Todd Terje   Programming,Producer
Oliver Thompson   Composer
Richard Williams   Liner Notes
Chris Mullings   Engineer
Isaac Ferry   Executive Producer
Johnny Dewe Mathews   Cover Photo
Jono Patrick   Digital Artwork
Tara Ferry   Executive Producer
Pete Wells   Engineer

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Avonmore 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Jay_Emme More than 1 year ago
Someone, several years back, described Bryan Ferry as "being as subtle as a punch in the nose". Lush musical landscapes that pretty much encouraged epic make-out sessions in front of old Kenwood hi-fi stacks. Avalon, Bette Noir, Boys and Girls, Mamouna, Taxi. Who can forget the sexhammer doubleshot we got from "Don't Stop the Dance" and "Slave to Love"? Good old Bryan Ferry. Then along came his “covertunes phase” where it was many unsuccessful rehashes of some very old standards (“Send in the Clowns” is an almost fatal mistake on this album). Not very pretty for a Bryan Ferry purist. Avonmore fixes that. Call it a return to the roots (the title itself may be a hint back to Avalon). You won't find Phil Manzanera on this album – but Mark Knopfler and a strong supporting studio cast gets it done. I don't think it's Ferry's best work yet, but it is a very satisfying recap of what attracted many people to his style. The dreamy landscapes are there with haunting guitars and ethereal backup vocals by unseen muses. Worth buying if you long for the old days! 1. Loop De Li – The hook. Gets you in the first 10 seconds. 2. Midnight Train – Trippy little ride on the metro. Solid uptempo beat. 3. Soldier of Fortune – A departure from the formula. Think “Ferry Unplugged”. 4. Driving Me Wild – Roxy Music. A poppy tune with some 70's organ piped into the background. 5. A Special Kind of Guy – Think “Boys and Girls B Side” that never made it. 6. Avonmore – Old school noir groove. Slam it into your usb port and take a night drive to this one. 7. Lost – Mamouna would have been a great place for this. Knopfler appears and does his thing. 8. One Night Stand – Break out the chapstick. Kiss and Tell updated. 9. Send in the Clowns – Why?!!! This track destroyed the flow. Playlist this one out. 10. Johnny and Mary – This one perplexed me. One Night Stand would have been a great finish. It had a strange Daft Punk meets an old Casio sound. Hopefully it's an intentional cliffhanger until his next album release. To recap – Very nice album. Definite buy if you've been looking for the late 70's, 80's Bryan Ferry.