The Awakening and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics)

The Awakening and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics)

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by Kate Chopin, Pamela Knights
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0192823000

ISBN-13: 9780192823007

Pub. Date: 05/28/2000

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Kate Chopin was one of the most individual and adventurous of nineteenth-century american writers, whose fiction explored new and often startling territory. When her most famous story, The Awakening, was first published in 1899, it stunned readers with its frank portrayal of the inner word of Edna Pontellier, and its daring criticisms of the limits of marriage and

Overview

Kate Chopin was one of the most individual and adventurous of nineteenth-century american writers, whose fiction explored new and often startling territory. When her most famous story, The Awakening, was first published in 1899, it stunned readers with its frank portrayal of the inner word of Edna Pontellier, and its daring criticisms of the limits of marriage and motherhood. The subtle beauty of her writing was contrasted with her unwomanly and sordid subject-matter: Edna's rejection of her domestic role, and her passionate quest for spiritual, sexual, and artistic freedom.
From her first stories, Chopin was interested in independent characters who challenged convention. This selection, freshly edited from the first printing of each text, enables readers to follow her unfolding career as she experimented with a broad range of writing, from tales for children to decadent fin-de siecle sketches. The Awakening is set alongside thirty-two short stories, illustrating the spectrum of the fiction from her first published stories to her 1898 secret masterpiece, "The Storm."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780192823007
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
05/28/2000
Series:
Oxford World's Classics Series
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 5.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
1030L (what's this?)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements vii
Introduction ix
Note on the Texts xliv
Select Bibliography xlix
A Chronology of Kate Chopin lvi
THE AWAKENING 3(345)
Wiser Than a God
129(10)
A Point at Issue!
139(12)
The Christ Light
151(5)
The Maid of Saint Phillippe
156(8)
Doctor Chevalier's Lie
164(2)
Beyond the Bayou
166(7)
Old Aunt Peggy
173(1)
Ripe Figs
174(1)
Miss McEnders
175(8)
At the 'Cadian Ball
183(10)
The Father of Desiree's Baby (Desiree's Baby)
193(6)
Caline
199(3)
A Matter of Prejudice
202(7)
Azelie
209(9)
A Lady of Bayou St. John
218(5)
La Belle Zoraide
223(6)
Tonie (At Cheniere Caminada)
229(11)
A Gentleman of Bayou Teche
240(6)
In Sabine
246(9)
A Respectable Woman
255(4)
The Dream of an Hour (The Story of an Hour)
259(3)
Lilacs
262(12)
Regret
274(4)
The Kiss
278(3)
Her Letters
281(8)
Athenaise
289(31)
The Unexpected
320(4)
Vagabonds
324(3)
A Pair of Silk Stockings
327(5)
An Egyptian Cigarette
332(4)
Elizabeth Stock's One Story
336(6)
The Storm: A Sequel to "The 'Cadian Ball"
342(6)
Appendix. Louisiana Observed: Regional Writing and Kate Chopin's People and Languages 348(12)
Explanatory Notes 360(48)
Glossary 408

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The Awakening and Other Stories 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kate Chopin is definitely best known for enveloping the concepts of women's desires, independence, and control of their lives in her writing. Her masterpiece, 'The Awakening', is one example of how she used these concepts. While this book was condemned during its time, it is a very intrigueing read. 'The Awakening' received condemnation in 1899 because of its sexual openness. It has since been rediscovered and taught in classrooms across America. Chopin's power to almost foresee the future reveals her insight. She knew women were eventually going to realize they deserved equal rights, and she was going to do something to help fight for it, even if it didn't result in immediate recognition or gratification. Chopin wanted women to be heard. Because of her perseverance and confidence, eventually her words were shared. The reader doesn't need to be a feminist to be able to enjoy 'The Awakening'. Indeed, it is centered on the process of a woman freeing herself from her responsibilities in order to focus on what she wants for herself; therefore, this theme can and should be compelling and motivational to both males and females. It is for these reasons 'The Awakening' should be celebrated and appreciated by people of any race, age, gender or background.