Awakening: And Selected Stories of Kate Chopin

Awakening: And Selected Stories of Kate Chopin

3.7 147
by Kate Chopin, Barbara H. Solomon
     
 

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ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED

BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:

• A concise introduction that gives readers important background information

• A chronology of the author's life and work

• A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical

Overview

ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED

BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:

• A concise introduction that gives readers important background information

• A chronology of the author's life and work

• A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context

• An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations

• Detailed explanatory notes

• Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work

• Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction

• A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.

SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON


Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Chopin's (1850-1904) The Awakening , whose heroine rejects her husband and children as she indulges in solitude and in an adulterous infatuation, was embraced by the women's movement 70 years after its publication. Although they pale in comparison to the novel, these stories, which comprise Chopin's third and last short-fiction collection, serve to flesh out the Chopin oeuvre and deserve a place on women's studies syllabi. As in The Awakening , the author's social critiques here demythologize women, marriage, religion and family. A women escapes ``the incessant chatter'' of other females at a party and retires to the male domain of the smoking room, where she puffs on hashish and dreams of a love affair torn asunder. The perverse Mrs. Mallard revels in her newfound freedom when informed that her husband is a casualty of a train accident and dies of a heart attack when he shows up alive. Her fiance is wasted by illness and reeks death, and a repulsed Dorothea bolts; elsewhere, a monk is lured by the voice of a woman, a former intimate. And in a twist on the plot of The Awakening , a husband, plagued by suspicions of his late wife's infidelity, casts himself in the river. Toth wrote the biography Kate Chopin. (Jan.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781417738953
Publisher:
San Val
Publication date:
04/28/1976

Read an Excerpt

The Awakening

And Selected Stories of Kate Chopin
By Kate Chopin

Signet Book

Copyright © 1976 Kate Chopin
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0451524489

Excerpt

Chapter 1

A green and yellow parrot, which hung in a cage outside the door, kept repeating over and over:

"Allez vous-en! Allez vous-en! Sapristi! That's all right!"

He could speak a little Spanish, and also a language which nobody understood, unless it was the mockingbird that hung on the other side of the door, whistling his fluty notes out upon the breeze with maddening persistence.

Mr. Pontellier, unable to read his newspaper with any degree of comfort, arose with an expression and an exclamation of disgust. He walked down the gallery and across the narrow "bridges" which connected the Lebrun cottages one with the other. He had been seated before the door of the main house. The parrot and the mockingbird were the property of Madame Lebrun, and they had the right to make all the noise they wished. Mr. Pontellier had the privilege of quitting their society when they ceased to be entertaining.

He stopped before the door of his own cottage, which was the fourth one from the main building and next to the last. Seating himself in a wicker rocker which was there, he once more applied himself to the task of reading the newspaper. The day was Sunday, the paper was a day old. The Sunday papers had not yet reached Grand Isle. He was already acquainted with the market reports, and he glanced restlessly over the editorials and bits of news which he had not had time to read before quitting New Orleans the day before.

Mr. Pontellier wore eye-glasses. He was a man of forty, of medium height and rather slender build; he stooped a little. His hair was brown and straight, parted on one side. His beard was neatly and closely trimmed.

Once in a while he withdrew his glance from the newspaper and looked about him. There was more noise than ever over at the house. The main building was called "the house," to distinguish it from the cottages. The chattering and whistling birds were still at it. Two young girls, the Farival twins, were playing a duet from "Zanipa" upon the piano. Madame Lebrun was bustling in and out, giving orders in a high key to a yard-boy whenever she got inside the house, and directions in an equally high voice to a dining-room servant whenever she got outside. She was a fresh, pretty woman, clad always in white with elbow sleeves. Her starched skirts crinkled as she came and went. Farther down, before one of the cottages, a lady in black was walking demurely up and down, telling her beads. A good many persons of the pension had gone over to the Chênière Caminada in Beaudelet's lugger to hear mass. Some young people were out under the water-oaks playing croquet. Mr. Pontellier's two children were there - sturdy little fellows of four and five. A quadroon nurse followed them about with a faraway, meditative air.

Mr. Pontellier finally fit a cigar and began to smoke, letting the paper drag idly from his hand. He fixed his gaze upon a white sunshade that was advancing at snail's pace from the beach. He could see it plainly between the gaunt trunks of the water-oaks and across the stretch of yellow camomile. The gulf looked far away, melting hazily into the blue of the horizon. The sunshade continued to approach slowly. Beneath its pink-lined shelter were his wife, Mrs. Pontellier, and young Robert Lebrun. When they reached the cottage, the two seated themselves with some appearance of fatigue upon the upper step of the porch, facing each other, each leaning against a supporting post.

"What folly! to bathe at such an hour in such heat!" exclaimed Mr. Pontellier. He himself had taken a plunge at daylight. That was why the morning seemed long to him.

"You are burnt beyond recognition," he added, looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage. She held up her hands, strong, shapely hands, and surveyed them critically, drawing up her lawn' sleeves above the wrists. Looking at them reminded her of her rings, which she had given to her husband before leaving for the beach. She silently reached out to him, and he, understanding, took the rings from his vest pocket and dropped them into her open palm. She slipped them upon her fingers; then clasping her knees, she looked across at Robert and began to laugh. The rings sparkled upon her fingers. He sent back an answering smile.

"What is it?" asked Pontellier, looking lazily and amused from one to the other. It was some utter nonsense; some adventure out there in the water, and they both tried to relate it at once. It did not seem half so amusing when told. They realized this, and so did Mr. Pontellier. He yawned and stretched himself. Then he got up, saying he had half a mind to go over to Klein's hotel and play a game of billiards.

"Come go along, Lebrun," he proposed to Robert. But Robert admitted quite frankly that he preferred to stay where he was and talk to Mrs. Pontellier.

"Well, send him about his business when he bores you, Edna," instructed her husband as he prepared to leave.

"Here, take the umbrella," she exclaimed, holding it out to him. He accepted the sunshade, and lifting it over his head descended the steps and walked away.

"Coming back to dinner?" his wife called after him. He halted a moment and shrugged his shoulders. He felt in his vest pocket; there was a ten-dollar bill there. He did not know; perhaps he would return for the early dinner and perhaps he would not. It all depended upon the company which he found over at Klein's and the size of "the game." He did not say this, but she understood it, and laughed, nodding good-by to him.

Both children wanted to follow their father when they saw him starting out. He kissed them and promised to bring them back bonbons and peanuts.

Copyright © 1998 by Simon & Schuster



Continues...


Excerpted from The Awakening by Kate Chopin Copyright © 1976 by Kate Chopin. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

One of the first books to truthfully write about women’s lives, Kate Chopin’s The Awakening is considered a quintessential work of Southern literature and a bold foray into early feminism. Aside from The Awakening, Chopin has written numerous short stories, many exploring Cajun, Creole, and Southern identities.

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The Awakening 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 147 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was difficult for me to like, sympathize or empathize with any of the main characters in this book. Nevertheless, this is an interesting character profile of a member of the "me generation" born 100 years too early, set deep within creole New Orleans society. An intellectually satisfying read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Boringggg !!!!
proofreadersp More than 1 year ago
A little too much description for every movement & thought. Very slow & boring!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Written with provocative undertone, chopin would have a grateful appause in the 21st century
auntie_mammy123 More than 1 year ago
I love this book! I have it in 3 different forms and this particular one has a few small glitches but nothing major! cant beat the price:0
HKIM05 More than 1 year ago
"I would give up the unessential; I would give up my money, I would give up my life for my children; but I wouldn't give myself." THE AWAKENING written by Kate Chopin portraits a world back in the late 1800s. A fascinating story of the life of a young woman, who is also a wife and a mother, shows challenges against the values of the world during that particular time period. Kate Chopin describes a world that she has been dreaming of, that she believes in women can say something rather than being controlled by men. The protagonist went against the important moral issue that was highly valued back in those days. The author applied adultery issues into the life of the main character to describe her journey towards freedom and independence. The story itself is a well-written piece, which made it easier for readers to take a quick glance into a world that has been nearly hundred years ago. Even though the novel is one of the most famous classic pieces, the clear usage of language and style of the author helped the readers in the process of understanding the conflicts. Kate Chopin, an explorer who challenged the idea of sexuality in American literature back in 1800s will guide readers to awaken their minds of ideas of individuality and liberty, which are concepts that we can observe in today's world thankful to the pioneer authors.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read Kate Chopin's The Awakening for a Lit course.I have read many books.Chopin's stories stay in my mind.I remember her characters as REAL people.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a book club selection at our office and it really caused a stir in the participants -- such a wide variety of thoughts about the book. I really enjoyed it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book was slow, i mean- really slow. It took longer to read those 100 or so pages than almost any book I've read but the climactic conclusion did improve my overall outlook on that wasted time spent dragging through this.
RI-Joe More than 1 year ago
Kate Chopin was featured in the St. Louis history museum in Forest Park (Free admission -- A wonderful city to visit!) so I decided to read one of her novels. A daring subject and approach for a female writer of her time. Typically existential for the period. A good book for understanding southern culture or women's issues in the 1800's. Suitable for reading for High School students.
Merciel More than 1 year ago
I liked this book. All the characters are flawed, but good and sympathetic nonetheless. Though Edna is definitely not one of the nobler protagonists, the reader does sympathize with her plight to find her own identity in a world where she has been defined by her relation to others (mother, daughter, etc.). Not much happens in the book, but I found each character interesting enough to care about them to the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is annoyingly boring and provided insight into the dull minds of 17th century women.
Richard Davis More than 1 year ago
To anyone hoping for any sort of entertainment from this story, you will be sorely disappointed. The characters are bland and flat, the plot holds no substance and the main conflict delivers neither a good payoff nor a satisfying resolution. The book's main character is meant to give off an air of independence and strength. She is meant to represent changing times and the will of women everywhere. Instead she comes off as a whiney brat with not a care for anyone but herself. Not only does she neglect her husband, but also the children that she brought into thos world. She moans and groans about the lack of attention given to her, all while completely staying in the background, running about with other men. No character in this novel is likable, and the ones who you manage not to hate all end up being boringand underused. Do not read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the google scanned books- the story is good but THE SCAN IS AWFUL -SPEND A BUCK & GET A GOOD COPY or your going to get alot of googly fonts & what looks almost like wingding font
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Woodsever More than 1 year ago
I tried very hard to read this book, but it was boring and I felt like maybe if I tried reading it another day I might have missed something.......not the case. It drones on and on with a plethora of characters who are also boring. I never read padt the fourth chapter because it was pointless drivel that went on and on about nothing and went nowhere. This author should have taken up another calling. Dont waste your time.
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