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Ayacucho, Goodbye and Moscow's Gold: Two Novellas on Peruvian Politics and Violence
     

Ayacucho, Goodbye and Moscow's Gold: Two Novellas on Peruvian Politics and Violence

by Julio Ortega, Edith Grossman (Translator), Alita Kelley (Translator)
 

In the first of two allegorical novellas, Peruvian peasant leader Alfonso Cánepa is murdered and mutilated by the police, but feeling unsatisfied with his death, the dead man sets out to recover his missing bones and seek Christian burial. During the pilgrimage from his mountain village to the capital he relates an epic satire of a Peru torn apart by a decade

Overview

In the first of two allegorical novellas, Peruvian peasant leader Alfonso Cánepa is murdered and mutilated by the police, but feeling unsatisfied with his death, the dead man sets out to recover his missing bones and seek Christian burial. During the pilgrimage from his mountain village to the capital he relates an epic satire of a Peru torn apart by a decade of terrorism and government repression. Stuck between life and death, the incomplete body of Cánepa finds humor, cynicism, and hope in a nation that has become "a graveyard with an airport." In Moscow's Gold, a Peruvian teenager's life is unexpectedly disrupted and complicated by the strains and repressions of the Cold War era. He realizes that sometimes a person must come to terms with the people that friends can become when put under pressure.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The first and more effective of these two aptly subtitled "novellas on Peruvian politics and violence" is told by a murdered peasant leader wandering the countryside looking for his missing bones to complete his burial, a sepulchral vision that provides an allegorical mouthpiece ("this national cemetery is a wake...a graveyard with an airport"). The premise of Moscow's Gold, which involves an adolescent's coming of age, is on the whole less convincing. Ortega (Latin American literature, Brown) has achieved fame both in fiction (The Land in the Day, LJ 1/15/79) and in criticism (Poetics of Change, LJ 7/84); Grossman is a successful translator of Garca Marquez. A startling and very clever attempt by exile Ortega to disguise Peruvian reality. Recommended for informed readers.-Lawrence Olszewski, OCLC, Dublin, Ohio

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780935480665
Publisher:
Latin American Literary Review Press
Publication date:
12/28/1994
Series:
Discoveries Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
104
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.30(d)

Meet the Author

Julio Ortega is the author of many books of fiction, poetry, and criticism, including Poetics of Change: The New Spanish-American Narrative and Gabriel García Márquez and the Powers of Fiction. He has received several honors as a writer and professor, including the Guggenheim Fellowship. He is a professor of Latin American Literature at Brown University. He lives in the area of Providence, Rhode Island. Edith Grossman is considered among the top Spanish-language literature translators in the United States and is known most notably for her translations of Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel García Márquez. She lives in New York City. Alita Kelley is a translator of The Identity of Hispanoamerica: An Interpretation of Colonial Literature. She is a emerita professor of modern languages at Penn State University. She lives in the Philadelphia area.

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