Baby Duck and the Bad Eyeglasses

Baby Duck and the Bad Eyeglasses

4.0 1
by Amy Hest, Jill Barton, Jill Barton
     
 

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Baby Duck has new glasses, and when she looks in the mirror, she doesn't look like Baby Duck anymore. No one can convince Baby Duck that she looks just fine with her new glasses on--until Grampa comes to play. As always, Grampa has a surprising way of cheering up Baby Duck. Amy Hest and Jill Barton, the creators of In the Rain with Baby Duck, tell another endearing…  See more details below

Overview

Baby Duck has new glasses, and when she looks in the mirror, she doesn't look like Baby Duck anymore. No one can convince Baby Duck that she looks just fine with her new glasses on--until Grampa comes to play. As always, Grampa has a surprising way of cheering up Baby Duck. Amy Hest and Jill Barton, the creators of In the Rain with Baby Duck, tell another endearing story about plucky Baby Duck and her kindly grandfather. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2Baby Duck returns with yet another challenge for her familycontriving her acceptance of a pair of unwanted eyeglasses. Mr. and Mrs. Duck try to flatter, encourage, and distract their child to no avail. Baby Duck won't hop or dance for fear of losing her spectacles (which do look rather precarious perched on her bill). But when Grandpa points out the similarity between his glasses and hers, Baby Duck resumes her splashing and twirling fun. Best of all, a brand new "Baby"-sized rowboat awaits and now she can read her name on it, too! This common childhood crisis is captured in the large and charming pencil-and-watercolor illustrations that fill every spread. The duck family is endearing and the soft colors of the background provide an effective contrast to the red-framed glasses. While the straightforward text is set in large type and simple enough for beginning readers to tackle on their own, the generous size of the book lends itself to group sharing as well. Fans of In the Rain with Baby Duck (Candlewick, 1995) will welcome her new trial and triumph and should be delighted to spot the boots and umbrella from her previous adventure.Carol Ann Wilson, Westfield Memorial Library, NJ
Ilene Cooper
Hest and Barton combine their considerable talents in a delightful story that shows the love between a grandfather and grandchild--and the virtues of looking on the bright side. Baby Duck is not pleased with her new red glasses. She doesn't want to jump or play because they might fall off, and, worse, she doesn't even think she looks like herself. Her parents insist that the glasses suit her just fine, but it's not until Grandpa comes along and holds a real dialogue with her about the glasses that she comes to appreciate them. Every page is rooted in truth, from the parents' wish for Baby to just get over it and like the glasses to the little duckling's feelings that glasses somehow make her different. It takes a perceptive grandfather, who reminds her that he, too, wears red glasses, to show that glasses change nothing except how much better you see. Both the format and the colored pencil-and-watercolor art are oversize, perfect for storytelling, even to large groups. But it's the ducks themselves that will win children's (and adults') hearts. Barton provides ducks so full of personality that you want to give them a hug--and so true to the human condition that children will recognize themselves.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780613228169
Publisher:
San Val, Incorporated
Publication date:
08/28/1999
Edition description:
Library Edition
Product dimensions:
8.64(w) x 10.36(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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Baby Duck and the Bad Eyeglasses 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Baby Duck is unhappy about the new glasses she has to wear because she thinks she can no longer hop, dance, or play or they will fall off. She also thinks she looks ugly in them. But, her bespeckled grandfather saves the day by reaassuring her about her glasses. He says they ¿are very fine . . .[b]ecause they are red like mine.¿ He convinces her that they won¿t fall off when she plays by having her splash in water and twirl around. Finally, he gives her a surprise ¿ a new little boat with her name on it ¿ which she can now read with her new glasses. Heartwarming, beautifully illustrations and large text make up for the somewhat skimpy story. Recommended for ages 2 to 8 and highly recommended for those with eyeglasses or young friends or family members who just got eyeglasses.