Baby Goose

Baby Goose

by Kate McMullan, Pascal Lemaitre
     
 

Hark, hark the dogs do bark, The babies are heading for home, Some with hats, and some with cats, And one with a brush and a comb. From beloved author Kate McMullan and illustrator Pascal Lematre comes the perfect collection of nursery rhymes for the bouncing baby in any family. Kate has selected rhymes with the most baby appeal, and then replaced the traditional

Overview

Hark, hark the dogs do bark, The babies are heading for home, Some with hats, and some with cats, And one with a brush and a comb. From beloved author Kate McMullan and illustrator Pascal Lematre comes the perfect collection of nursery rhymes for the bouncing baby in any family. Kate has selected rhymes with the most baby appeal, and then replaced the traditional hero or heroine with a baby. The result is utterly irresistible. Divided into sections and illustrated with Pascal's boisterous little ones, this makes a wonderful first introduction to Mother Goose and is a perfect gift for the mom-to-be, newborn, or young child.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
This Mother Goose collection answers the burning question: Just how cute would it be if 27 nursery rhymes became completely baby-centric? Loosely sorting the verse into four sections that correspond to the arc of a baby's day, McMullan (If I Were Your Bunny) takes certain liberties with the verse as she casts infants in the title roles. For "Oh, the Grand Old Duke of York," she installs "the Baby Duke of York" to command 10,000 men. The three men in a tub are similarly deposed, as "Baby Splasher, Baby Slosher/ Baby Soapy Face Washer" replace the butcher, baker and candlestick-maker. While there's no denying that the target audience is notorious for its egocentrism, the rhymes rarely gain anything in this translation: "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" is no more meaningful when the second line reads, "Babies wonder what you are." And often, something feels lost-those references to enchanted places, odd people and long ago times that give nursery rhymes their magic. But the results never turns twee, thanks to the irresistible, round-headed charms of Lemaetre's (who collaborated with McMullan for Supercat) diapered cast. Precociously dramatic, the babies scamper about the pages on chubby little legs, gleefully running with the hounds on "Hark, Hark, the Dogs Do Bark," and riding a cockhorse to Banbury Cross. Ages 6 mos.-3 yrs. (Oct.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
There can never be enough Mother Goose compendiums! In this collection, McMullan has taken Mother Goose rhymes and grouped them into four sections: "Good Morning, Baby Goose," "Out and About, Baby Goose," "Splish-Splash, Baby Goose," and "Good Night, Baby Goose." Some of the selected verses are well known while others are more unusual but all are delightfully filled with rhyme and rhythm. Not only are the verses well chosen, but the charmingly spare illustrations in a soft and vibrant palette makes this an appealing package. 2004, Hyperion, Ages 3 to 7.
—Joan Kindig, Ph.D.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-McMullan reworks 27 traditional rhymes to give babies center stage, beginning with Old Mother Goose on her gander with wee baby "geese" flying behind. Some babies like their Pease Porridge Hot and others their cake rolled and patted and marked with a B. Baby Griggs has seven wigs, the Baby Duke of York marches his men up the hill and down again, and a fine baby rides a white horse to Banbury Cross. The rhymes are collected thematically into four sections: morning, out and about, splish-splash, and bedtime. Whimsical, cartoon-style, pen-and-ink drawings are filled with babies, babies, babies, along with grown-ups, toys, barnyard animals, and an endearing group of animated sausages that show up when Baby goes a-walking and make their appearance again and again, finally flying obliviously off into the starlit night in the jaws of a friendly, if hungry, dog. An appealing front cover depicting a baby sleeping on a goose's back invites readers in, and pink and blue endpapers suggesting sunrise and sunset are particularly attractive. A charming addition to the Mother Goose canon.-Marie Orlando, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
McMullan brings babies to center stage in 27 thematically arranged, deftly altered Mother Goose rhymes-"Hark hark the dogs do bark / The babies are coming to town," "Oh, the Baby Duke of York / He had ten thousand men," "Baby Foster went to Gloucester," etc. Lema"tre illustrates each with a cartoon-style scene, featuring diaper-clad toddlers accompanied by a varied and recurring cast of farm animals, pets, bugs, bath toys, and dancing sausages. Unlike Rosemary Wells's Here Comes Mother Goose (1999) and similar collections, there's no breaking of crowns, falling of cradles, or other violence. Oversensitive parental readers may be pleased by that, and certainly by the tongue-in-cheek art; babies will, as ever, enjoy hearing the playful nonsense. (Nursery rhymes. 0-3)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786804306
Publisher:
Hyperion Books for Children
Publication date:
11/01/2004
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
1 - 4 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >