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Baby's Morningtime
     

Baby's Morningtime

by Judy Collins
 
This gorgeous album accompanies a tranquil, watercolor-animated video of the same name. It consists of folk thrush Judy Collins applying her famous silvery voice to musical versions of classic children's poems and nursery rhymes. As if that weren't reason enough to swoon, the orchestral arrangements are by renowned orchestrator Ernest

Overview

This gorgeous album accompanies a tranquil, watercolor-animated video of the same name. It consists of folk thrush Judy Collins applying her famous silvery voice to musical versions of classic children's poems and nursery rhymes. As if that weren't reason enough to swoon, the orchestral arrangements are by renowned orchestrator Ernest Troost. There's plenty of verses from children's bard Robert Louis Stevenson, of course, including a lyrical, waltz-time "Will There Really Be a Morning?" and "Happy Thought." Daybreak-themed cuts, such as "Dew Drop," "Ducks at Dawn, " "Getting Out of Bed," and "Morning Is a Little Lass," are sprinkled throughout. But even amid such a surfeit of loveliness, one cut manages to stand out: Gertrude Stein's "I Am Rose," so languid and rapturous you'll have to pinch yourself to make sure you're not dreaming.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
Like its simultaneously released companion album, Baby's Bedtime, Judy Collins' Baby's Morningtime is a children's recording, and it is another collection of music composed and arranged by Ernest Troost. But while the other disc has a specific function, providing lullabies to put children to bed, this one has a less specific purpose. "Contains 26 Morning Songs for Infants Through Age 5," reads a legend on the cover, but in practice the "morning songs" turn out to be poems by the likes of Emily Dickinson, William Wordsworth, Christina Rossetti, Gertrude Stein, and Robert Browning, among others, given musical settings by Troost that range from light classical through country-folk to soft rock. The disc certainly sets a gentle mood, especially because of Collins' typically clear and ethereal singing, but much of the time it seems less like an album aimed at children than an esoteric art project for the singer and composer. True, tracks like "The Pancake" and "The Worm" address children's topics, but much of the time the album consists of one musical vignette after another (26 tracks in about 37 minutes) to which small children couldn't really be expected to respond. As esoteric art projects go, however, it is quite engaging for those over the age of five.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/06/1995
Label:
Lightyear
UPC:
0085365411623
catalogNumber:
54116
Rank:
175441

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