Back Home Again

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Kerry Dexter
Rhonda Vincent, who's played and sung traditional bluegrass since she was a child, spent several years recording in mainstream country music and contributed harmony vocals to Dolly Parton's top-selling, return-to-the-roots album, THE GRASS IS BLUE. Weaving these musical threads together in a heartfelt tapestry of great singing and great songs, from the driving beat and Vincent's own rhythmic mandolin chops of "Passing of the Train" to the country-blues-tinged "Pretending I Don't Care," Vincent proves that these folk and country roots truly are her heritage. With spare instrumentation including Jerry Douglas's Dobro, Vincent and her brother Darrin offer the high lonesome...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Kerry Dexter
Rhonda Vincent, who's played and sung traditional bluegrass since she was a child, spent several years recording in mainstream country music and contributed harmony vocals to Dolly Parton's top-selling, return-to-the-roots album, THE GRASS IS BLUE. Weaving these musical threads together in a heartfelt tapestry of great singing and great songs, from the driving beat and Vincent's own rhythmic mandolin chops of "Passing of the Train" to the country-blues-tinged "Pretending I Don't Care," Vincent proves that these folk and country roots truly are her heritage. With spare instrumentation including Jerry Douglas's Dobro, Vincent and her brother Darrin offer the high lonesome sound on "You Don't Know How Lucky You Are," and Vincent gives the nod to her friend from Locust Ridge, Tennessee, with a stellar version of Dolly Parton's love triangle tale, "Jolene." Fans of Dolly and bluegrass chart-toppers Alison Krauss and Claire Lynch, take note.
All Music Guide - Stacia Proefrock
Rhonda Vincent's 17 albums have seen her journey from bluegrass to country and back to bluegrass again over the course of a career that began when she was just five. Back Home Again solidifies here position in the bluegrass community, which is where she truly belongs -- her voice and musical skill never really fit well into the world of commercial country music. Vincent's greatest talent is as a vocalist, and her twangy sound is right at home on this album. On Back Home Again, she also plays mandolin on most tracks. She chooses her songs well, coming up with a collection of faith-tinged tunes about love and struggle, but at times her rendition of them seems a little fast and frantic. Bluegrass has a history of lightning-fast solos and chaotic jumbles of strings, but there are places on this album where a little more clarity could be achieved by simplification or a slight slow-down. Still, though, there are many highlights on the album: the touching "Little Angels," a cover of the great Dolly Parton song "Jolene," and "Out of Hand," which is performed with her father, Johnny, and brother, Darrin, recreating the sound that they had when they performed together during Rhonda's childhood as the Sally Mountain Show.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/11/2000
  • Label: Rounder / Umgd
  • UPC: 011661046023
  • Catalog Number: 610460
  • Sales rank: 16,583

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Rhonda Vincent Primary Artist, Primary Artist, Guitar, Mandolin, Harmonium, Vocals, Vocal Harmony
Jerry Douglas Dobro
Glen Duncan Fiddle
Luke Bulla Fiddle
Marc Pruett Banjo
Johnny Vincent Vocals
Darrin Vincent Bass, Harmonium, Vocals, Harmony
Paul Brewster Harmonium, Harmony
Bryan Sutton Guitar, Mandolin
Ron Stewart Banjo, Fiddle
Randy Barnes Bass
Ron Spears Guitar
Technical Credits
Rhonda Vincent Producer, Liner Notes, Song Notes
George Jones Composer
Dolly Parton Liner Notes
Ronnie Light Producer, Engineer
Toby Mountain Mastering
D'Jango Inspiration
Jon Weisberger Liner Notes
Lynne Cook Photo Assistance
Don Winters Composer
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Classical Bluegrass

    This woman is one of the greatest performers in Bluegrass today. I don't know why PBS hasn't done an "American Experience" episode about her or why she isn't playing and lecturing on Ivy League campuses with courses in American Culture."Back Home Again" is a ten year old recording that shows the continuing promise of an artist whose vocal instrument only gets better and more powerful with each passing year. She will throw in a little folk and country on her later records. What you get here is a pure Appalachian soprano with an infallible ear for the sweet spot of Bluegrass harmonies. She's faithful to the conventions of the genre: lost loves, train songs, earthly angels, and it all sounds new: "Lonesome Wind Blues", "Passing of the Train", and a version of "You're in My Heart" where the pure elegance of her singing is underlined by the elegant fiddle playing of Ron Stewart. It will stay and play in your heart. There is a song about child molestation, "Little Angels", that I found jarring and out of genre and rightly so. So was Billie Holliday's "Strange Fruit". As good as Rhonda Vincent is here...and that means very good...it's interesting to play this recording and compare it with the work she's doing now. To paraphrase Carl Sandberg's comment about The Weavers, when I hear Rhonda Vincent I hear America singing.

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