Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn't Know You Could Eat

Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn't Know You Could Eat

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by Ellen Zachos
     
 

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There’s food growing everywhere! You’ll be amazed by how many of the plants you see each day are actually nutritious edibles. Ideal for first-time foragers, this book features 70 edible weeds, flowers, mushrooms, and ornamental plants typically found in urban and suburban neighborhoods. Full-color photographs make identification easy, while tips on

Overview

There’s food growing everywhere! You’ll be amazed by how many of the plants you see each day are actually nutritious edibles. Ideal for first-time foragers, this book features 70 edible weeds, flowers, mushrooms, and ornamental plants typically found in urban and suburban neighborhoods. Full-color photographs make identification easy, while tips on common plant locations, pesticides, pollution, and dangerous flora make foraging as safe and simple as stepping into your own backyard.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Dominique Browning
…extremely appealing…Forget farm to table. Here's weed to bowl.
Publishers Weekly
Foraging is all the culinary rage these days, but the idea of harvesting backyard ‘shrooms for use in store-bought pasta and salads may be off putting to those scared of severe hallucinations. But Zachos, who leads foraging walks and teaches at the New York Botanical Garden, ushers the reader safely through the foliage where ants and beetles roam and into the enlightened land, where sheep sorrel, chickweed, dandelion, sumac, and prickly pear become edible parts on the most discerning palate. Unfamiliar edibles are described at length, with instructions for their harvest and preparation time when cooking. With such wholesome food comes also vindication: our parents really were wrong when they said we couldn’t eat acorns. (Mar.)
Booklist
“[An] impressively comprehensive guide by horticulturist Zachos, who stresses the “ease and elegance” of foraging familiar plants—greens, fruits, nuts, seeds, tubers, and fungi—in yards and nearby environs. … Eye-catching sidebars on legality, quick plant identification, food-preparation tips, and more accompany the main text, which is abundantly illustrated with full-color photos throughout.”

director of Wild Food Adventures John Kallas

“[An] impressively comprehensive guide by horticulturist Zachos, who stresses the “ease and elegance” of foraging familiar plants—greens, fruits, nuts, seeds, tubers, and fungi—in yards and nearby environs. … Eye-catching sidebars on legality, quick plant identification, food-preparation tips, and more accompany the main text, which is abundantly illustrated with full-color photos throughout.”

From the Publisher

“Forget farm to table. Here’s weed to bowl. ... Extremely appealing.”

The New York Times
“Forget farm to table. Here’s weed to bowl. ... Extremely appealing.”

Library Journal
Hungry for a healthy snack? While Musselman, et al., cover wild plants, certified horticulturist Zachos suggests you simply visit your yard, where you can nibble on cultivated landscape plants such as hosta or munch on some mulberries. With Zachos as your knowledgeable and witty guide, you will soon see common landscape plants and garden weeds, etc., as a smorgasbord of edible fruits, vegetables, flowers, roots, nuts, and fungi. Chapters cover general information about foraging plus profiles of edible plants arranged by plant part (greens, fruits, nuts and seeds, etc.), and offer some basic recipes and information on preserving your foraged fare. Each profile includes a short description of the plant, where to find it, and how to harvest and eat it, along with lovely color photos. Unfortunately, the profiles do not include USDA hardiness zones or regions in which the plants are commonly found. The book includes very brief, general content on cultivation, but since the plants are quite common, that data can be easily found elsewhere. There is also a short but excellent annotated list of additional sources of information. VERDICT Readers interested in local food and new tastes will enjoy this clear, well-illustrated guide to the culinary delights lurking nearby.—Janet Crum, City of Hope Lib., Duarte, CA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612120096
Publisher:
Storey Books
Publication date:
03/12/2013
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
225,472
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 6.90(h) x 0.40(d)

What People are saying about this

director of Wild Food Adventures John Kallas
"A worthy and eye-opening addition to anyone's personal wild food library."

Author of Nature's Garden and The Forager's Harv Samuel Thayer
"There is a food frontier nine steps from your backdoor, and Ellen Zachos is giving a tour. In this beautiful and accessible guidebook, she introduces us to the culinary use of a wealth of free, exotic, and gourmet produce that almost nobody knew existed."

author of Kiss My Aster Amanda Thomsen
"I think of myself as a backyard know-it-all, but this book schooled me! I found myself exclaiming "no way!"at page after page."

Daniel Klein
"Suddenly, a walk through the garden becomes a treasure hunt."

Gary Lincoff
"This is the book I had when I first got interested in eating 'wild'."

Meet the Author

Ellen Zachos is the foraging expert at About.com where she shares seasonal recipes and tips on foraging. She travels across the country in partnership with RemyUSA, teaching foraged mixology workshops to bartenders. Zachos is a regular contributor to several of the Edible magazines and is a Senior Regional Advisor at Garden Compass, a plant identification app. She is a Harvard graduate and the author of six books including Backyard Foraging. A long-time instructor at the New York Botanic Garden, Ellen has recently moved to Santa Fe, NM.


 

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Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn't Know You Could Eat 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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