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Bad Boy, Good Boy
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Bad Boy, Good Boy

5.0 1
by Kay Chorao
 

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Sam is a good boy, but he always seems to be getting into trouble! His grandma thinks he is being careless, running through her garden, but he is just saving his best friend’s hat from the wind. He helps his grandpa make honey toast, but then takes the rap when his mother arrives to survey the mess. His parents think Sam has disobeyed them by going out into

Overview


Sam is a good boy, but he always seems to be getting into trouble! His grandma thinks he is being careless, running through her garden, but he is just saving his best friend’s hat from the wind. He helps his grandpa make honey toast, but then takes the rap when his mother arrives to survey the mess. His parents think Sam has disobeyed them by going out into a storm, when in fact he is saving a little hatchling that had fallen from its nest.
Part picture book and part graphic panels, older children will love this fun story and will identify with misunderstood Sam as he struggles between what is right and wrong, what is good and bad.

Praise for Bad Boy, Good Boy
"In four brief chapters, young readers meet Sam, an exuberant, somewhat impulsive pup whose heart is in the right place."
Kirkus Reviews

"Chorao’s visual storytelling is strong—her watercolor, gouache, and black pen panel illustrations are suggestive of a graphic novel for youngest readers."
Publishers Weekly

"The animal characters have comical expressions and a great sense of movement. Chorao makes some enjoyably interesting choices in breaking up pages into comic-book panels, adding to the overall visual appeal. Kids will certainly relate to Sam, whose intentions are always good even if he sometimes causes a commotion."
School Library Journal

"Chorao’s signature watercolor, gouache, and ink illustrations depict all the characters as dogs with human attributes and emotions."
Booklist
 

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Chorao (All the Seasons of the Year) introduces an anthropomorphic puppy with a big heart and a nose for trouble in this uneven collection of four tales. Even when Sam is being “bad,” his intentions are anything but. He disrupts his grandparents’ and parents’ activities—apologizing each time—as he barrels through the yard to retrieve his friend Olive’s lost hat. In other stories, Sam agrees to help his discombobulated Grandpa put together a midnight snack, makes a mess with paints in the classroom, and sneaks outdoors to rescue a bird that has fallen from its nest. Chorao sometimes keeps readers in the dark about Sam’s motivations, later revealing the “good” behind his “bad” actions. Children aren’t likely to mind that, but they may be troubled by how often Sam’s family and friends angrily call him a “bad boy”—Sam may be slovenly, careless, and unpredictable, but the adults in his life frequently come across as callous or even verbally abusive. Chorao’s visual storytelling is strong—her watercolor, gouache, and black pen panel illustrations are suggestive of a graphic novel for youngest readers—but the underlying story disappoints. Ages 5–8. (May)
Children's Literature - Jean Boreen
Four short stories tell of everyday events in the life of Sam, a mischievous little puppy who just cannot seem to do things the way his parents or grandparents would like him to—until he manages to do something amidst the mischief that actually helps someone out. For example, in the second story, "Snack," Sam finds his grandfather downstairs in the middle of the night attempting to make scrambled eggs and toast. Without his glasses, Sam's grandfather is melting cheese instead of butter; when Grandpa asks Sam to help, Sam does, although he remembers that he has been told by his mother not to make messes in the kitchen. Sam and Grandpa eventually get their eggs made—with chocolate sprinkles instead of pepper—but when Mama finds them in the middle of her messy kitchen, she is not happy. Then Sam explains how he helped Grandfather, and he is redeemed from "bad" to "good" boy. The illustrations for this text add a great deal in providing the personalities of all of the characters. This is a fun text that will appeal to many young children. Reviewer: Jean Boreen, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Poor Sam always seems to be in trouble due to an excess of joie de vivre. He disturbs his family while pretending to be the wind but finds his best friend's hat. He disappears in the middle of a stormy day only to be found sitting in a big nest he built to protect a baby bird who had fallen from a tree. Chorao shows that youngsters can have two sides to their personalities through her colorful, amusing pictures. When he is awakened by a nighttime noise, Sam sneaks downstairs to find Grandpa making a mess in the kitchen. Hindered by his lack of glasses, Grandpa needs help making chocolate eggs and toast along with a huge mess, ultimately getting Sam into trouble. Sam explains all to Mom and Grandpa thanks him for helping. The animal characters have comical expressions and a great sense of movement. Chorao makes some enjoyably interesting choices in breaking up pages into comic-book panels, adding to the overall visual appeal. Kids will certainly relate to Sam, whose intentions are always good even if he sometimes causes a commotion.—B. Allison Gray, Goleta Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
The tale of a young pup whose good deeds only appear naughty falls flat due to the repeated use of judgmental phrases in speech bubbles. In four brief chapters, young readers meet Sam, an exuberant, somewhat impulsive pup whose heart is in the right place. While he does run amok through the grown-ups' activities ("Bad boy!") on the way to finding a friend's lost hat ("Good boy!"), he is very careful not to make the same mistakes upon his return, though the adults don't notice. When banned-from-cooking Sam helps blind-without-his-glasses Grandpa with his midnight snack, the large cartoon panels show Mama's progression from anger to understanding. Some quite accidental mishaps at school provoke his teacher to call him a "Bad boy!" and send him to the corner, where he purposefully starts trouble and, confusingly, is dubbed a creative "Good boy!" In the final chapter, Sam slips out unseen during a storm; his frantic relatives find him sheltering a fallen baby bird. Watercolor, gouache and pen illustrations show anthropomorphized dogs whose expressions speak volumes, especially the angry and fearful ones. Unlike Chorao's Kate (Up and Down with Kate, 2001), Sam doesn't face everyday situations, so readers may find it difficult to relate…unless they often hear the titular phrases. What is most worrisome is that even when the grown-ups seem to recognize that Sam is trying his best to do the right thing, they don't see that he learns from his mistakes and is a good boy indeed. Readers will be left saying, "Poor Sam," after this one. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781419705205
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
05/07/2013
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
12.00(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD160L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Kay Chorao has written and illustrated a number of books, including Abrams’ D Is for Drums and Through All the Seasons. She lives in New York City and Jamesport, Long Island.

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Bad Boy, Good Boy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hello